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Thread: New Record Coho

  1. #1
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Default New Record Coho

    Another Icy Straits fish. Buddy at work told me of a guy who landed a 28-pounder a few weeks before the Derby. They weighed it, then gutted it and put it in the box. They had no clue was the record was until he told them.

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    Record Coho caught by California man at White Stone Harbor

    There's a new record Coho catch for the State of Alaska.

    The monster Coho was caught at White Stone Harbor in Southeast Alaska.

    We spoke with Bob Piorkowski who is the Fish Resource Permit and Trophy Fish Programs Coordinator in the Department of Fish and Game.

    He says he received a call Tuesday that a large coho had been caught in Icy Strait.

    The official weight ended up being 26 pounds and 11 ounces.

    Piorkowski says that surpasses the previous record of 26 pounds that was caught in the same area in 1976.

    The lucky angler is Steve Atkinson of Huntington Beach, California.

    They had two hand scales at White Stone Harbor that had the fish weight at 27 pounds. They knew the state record was 26 pounds so they chartered an aircraft in order to get it on the official scale at Jerry's Meats in Juneau as soon as possible.

    Piorkowski says he'll be issuing Atkinson a trophy fish certificate.

    The coho would have won last weekend's derby. The winner is a 24.8 pound King.

    But, of course, it was caught two days after the derby and White Stone Harbor is outside of the derby boundaries.

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    I tell anyone who will listen, Cross Sound and Icy Straits are the most under-rated bodies of water in the state. Kings along homeshore, Lings out in Cross Sound, Halibut around pleasant Island. Silvers just about everywhere. Heck, kings in front of the hoonah dock for that matter. I luv me sum Icy Strait fishing.
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    Charterboat Operator kodiakcombo's Avatar
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    wow! back in 1992 I was on charter with a couple who landed a silver that sat in the tote all day and then when we unloaded the tote I said Wow that is a huge silver! I had them take it to Kodiak and weigh it at city market, it was 23.6 pounds.
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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I wonder how old those big silvers are...
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    Odds are it was a 18-month fish (salt). Their life history has been well documented, and 30-month fish are very, very few and far between. As for rearing years, the origin of the fish would be the greatest determining factor - most places have age 2 and 3 fish going to sea for the bulk of the run, while some places have age 4 to 6 fish as the representatives.

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    Member hooternanny's Avatar
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    it sure is nice to see that, a new record and to happen in the modern day, in our time, it proves that the best days have not gone by. i am suprised more haven't commented on that big fat silver.

    we have so much to be greatful for in our time, that this record lunkers was out there. and the likelyhood that it could happen to any of us at any time
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  7. #7
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G_Smolt View Post
    Odds are it was a 18-month fish (salt). Their life history has been well documented, and 30-month fish are very, very few and far between. As for rearing years, the origin of the fish would be the greatest determining factor - most places have age 2 and 3 fish going to sea for the bulk of the run, while some places have age 4 to 6 fish as the representatives.
    Wouldn't a record fish probably be a 30 month fish? Hope someone took a scale, I for one would like to know.

    Coho are very interesting, they (USFW I think) once found like an 8 year old fish hanging out in a pond in the upper moose river drainage, just stuck there, never moved, I think it was like 12 inches. We caught several in the smolt trap at litnik that were 14 inch smolt.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  8. #8

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    Monkey how can they tell how old a fish is?


    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    Wouldn't a record fish probably be a 30 month fish? Hope someone took a scale, I for one would like to know.

    Coho are very interesting, they (USFW I think) once found like an 8 year old fish hanging out in a pond in the upper moose river drainage, just stuck there, never moved, I think it was like 12 inches. We caught several in the smolt trap at litnik that were 14 inch smolt.
    Random guy in Fly shop: "Where did this happen???? In real life or in Alaska?"

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    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    I want to see this fish....

    2242132459_cfde3e7a6c_o.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by sodabiscuit12345 View Post
    Monkey how can they tell how old a fish is?
    Pretty sure you can determine a fish's age by examining the otoliths (ear bones). For lots of fish they develop "rings" like trees do.

  11. #11

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    wow, that's a big coho..

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    Member hooternanny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coho slayer View Post
    I want to see this fish....

    2242132459_cfde3e7a6c_o.jpg
    too funny! the dude from Momento. busted me up brother. that was a great movie
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    You can look at the otolith, or you can look at a scale from a certain area called the key scale area. You can count the growth between seasons. The first few are neat to look at, after that...ugh!!

  14. #14

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    Any one know where about that fish was heading? Are those big silvers down there Alaska fish or perhaps BC or northwest somewhere?

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    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    I asked myself the same question when I made my initial post.

    Talked to a few gillnetting buddies of mine about this. Taku River has some big silvers, but not real big kings. Whiting River has some big ones too. Not sure about the Berners, Katzeheen or Chilkat system fish. I do believe they are N'ern S.E. fish destined for a mainland-origin river system.

    Looked thru the local Derby results for the past 10 years. 21.9 silver in 2009 and a 22.2 pounder in 2004. Nothing over 22.2 in the past 15 years tho.

  16. #16
    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    The DNA analysis showed Ship Creek as the origin.
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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    aging salmon is really easy you can use scales or odiliths here are some king scales
    Attachment 52060
    you read em like tree rings the small ring on the inside is a winter in freshwater, the big rings are saltwater winters
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishGod View Post
    The DNA analysis showed Ship Creek as the origin.
    WOW. You dont see big silvers caught there very often. I think the biggest Ive seen there was like 14lbs. Unless youre joking of course it would be amazing to see a fish that size in there thats not a king.
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    Member hooternanny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c6 batmobile View Post
    WOW. You dont see big silvers caught there very often. I think the biggest Ive seen there was like 14lbs. Unless youre joking of course it would be amazing to see a fish that size in there thats not a king.
    not caught in ship creek, from the hatchery
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  20. #20
    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hooternanny View Post
    not caught in ship creek, from the hatchery
    Yeah I understand that. But it was headed that way. That means there are likely others that get pretty big that head in and out of there just gotta find em.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

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