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Thread: 180gr North Fork SS - 300Win Mag - 3193fps - Bullet Test

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    Default 180gr North Fork SS - 300Win Mag - 3193fps - Bullet Test

    I did a bullet test using hard water jugs not milk jugs filled with water. First jug was a 3 gallon water dispensing container followed by gallon hard plastic jug bottles. The 180gr SS North Fork moving out of my 300Win Mag at 3193fps, just ten yards from the jugs, traveled 3 feet 10 inches through the media. Bullet weighed 151.8grs and had expanded too .658” in diameter. Needless to say not only was it impressive but I was literally soaked by a rain shower. I purposely got this close to see it the bullet would hold up close at these velocities. After this test I would not hesitate to choose this bullet traveling at the above velocities if I were hunting large or dangerous game.









    I have never been as impressed with the impact of any bullet hitting water jugs as with this 180gr NF out of my 300Win Mag Hard to describe, sure wish I had a video of the event, I mean it was a shear explosion. This is one serious load, I would not be afraid to face a brown bear a close range with this bullet or an African lion. Still can't get over this morning and the impact results.
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    Thats all F&D but when was the last time you shot something worthy of that round at 10 yds? Not giving you crap (maybe a little) but it's not a very good evaluation of performance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PRDATR View Post
    Thats all F&D but when was the last time you shot something worthy of that round at 10 yds? Not giving you crap (maybe a little) but it's not a very good evaluation of performance.
    You got a better one, if so do it, and we will all benefit from it. Don't just tell us it is not a good measure, show us a good one. That bullet hit that media with 4,014 ft pounds of energy and held together, that is significant. Here is how it did in a media test that a friend of mine just finished with this same bullet out of a 30-06 and his following comments after testing.

    Caliber Tested: .30-06 Springfield
    Bullet(s): North Fork Bullets - 30-cal North Fork 180gr. SS
    Rifle: Winchester Model 70, 22" Barrel
    Chronograph: ProChrono Digital, ~10 yds. from muzzle
    Media: Soaked stacked newspaper, 12 yds. from muzzle





    Leave it to say that it's the most impressive bullet terminally-for-velocity that I've tested. Seen similar cavities a number of times, but it's notable that they were with bullets at higher velocity. Impressed.
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    300 win mag has turned out to F&D for me, the last moosed i took was ranged by a buddy who was 287 yrds from the bull and we estimated i made the shot from 330yrds. i put 4 rounds into the bull, but that is just a habit- if he is still standing. from that 1st shot that bull was dead on its feet. i had aimed at nearly the tip top of the shoulder. the bullet sighted in at 200 yrds is 2" high and i estimate that next 100 yards cover with that shot, the bullet dropped maybe 6 " at the most.

    after pulling the trigger on that bull, and the other animals my 300 has taken, i wouldn't trade it for a 30-06 or a 338. i have hunted with partners with both of those calibers, and 30-06 is my choice between the two because if you can't hit the target what good is the weapon. some say a weapon is only as good as the scope, i partially agree with that. usually when out for deer i will use a 160 to 180 grain, and higher up for bigger game.

    your post suprises me because it is a 180 grain getting 3 ' of penitraition. i don't know everything there is to know ballistic wise, but too me that is impressive but it's just water juggs? i wonder are you aware how thick a grizzly is headlong??
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    Quote Originally Posted by hooternanny View Post
    300 win mag has turned out to F&D for me, the last moosed i took was ranged by a buddy who was 287 yrds from the bull and we estimated i made the shot from 330yrds. i put 4 rounds into the bull, but that is just a habit- if he is still standing. from that 1st shot that bull was dead on its feet. i had aimed at nearly the tip top of the shoulder. the bullet sighted in at 200 yrds is 2" high and i estimate that next 100 yards cover with that shot, the bullet dropped maybe 6 " at the most.

    after pulling the trigger on that bull, and the other animals my 300 has taken, i wouldn't trade it for a 30-06 or a 338. i have hunted with partners with both of those calibers, and 30-06 is my choice between the two because if you can't hit the target what good is the weapon. some say a weapon is only as good as the scope, i partially agree with that. usually when out for deer i will use a 160 to 180 grain, and higher up for bigger game.

    your post suprises me because it is a 180 grain getting 3 ' of penitraition. i don't know everything there is to know ballistic wise, but too me that is impressive but it's just water juggs? i wonder are you aware how thick a grizzly is headlong??
    Do you know how hard water is, most don't, water does not compress. I wonder if you are aware or how thick a cape buffalo is, I have hit and taken a cape baffalo with a 300 mag and there is not a bear alive that has as thick a skin, muscle or bone structure as a buff. The second test done by my friend is even more impressive. Go line up a bunch of one gallon water jugs and shoot your favorite bullet and see just how surprised you are that so few jugs of water can stop your bullet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    Do you know how hard water is, most don't, water does not compress. I wonder if you are aware or how thick a cape buffalo is, I have hit and taken a cape baffalo with a 300 mag and there is not a bear alive that has as thick a skin, muscle or bone structure as a buff. The second test done by my friend is even more impressive. Go line up a bunch of one gallon water jugs and shoot your favorite bullet and see just how surprised you are that so few jugs of water can stop your bullet.
    no i don't have a clue of how to do a ballisitics test. i do think most prefer something as big if not bigger than a 300 or 30-06. but as shot placement goes, so is the key. you are the first person i have ever heard say a 300 win mag in african species. i sure love my 300 at one time i thought it could take down anything, untill others convinced me there was no way it would stop some big game, such as some you have mentioned. now you tell me you have done it. thats so cool. i am going to try and send a video
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    Quote Originally Posted by hooternanny View Post
    your post suprises me because it is a 180 grain getting 3 ' of penitraition. i don't know everything there is to know ballistic wise, but too me that is impressive but it's just water juggs? i wonder are you aware how thick a grizzly is headlong??
    I used a 180gr bullet from a 300 to get a complete pass through length-wise on a brown bear before.

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    can't upload the video, it is an african lion hunt where the lion charges. perhaps you've seen it.

    the bullet you show looks somewhat like what i use typically. i think "nosler partition". are you familiar with those and are they structured similarly. AND, do you have a therory as to why the NF round did so well in your test
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    from the link below, it must be this you are refer to, the bullet you tested-

    from the link" Recently, a cup point solid was added to offer an “expanding solid” to be used on the toughest of game as an alternative to the soft point." & that is why it stayed together?

    http://www.northforkbullets.com/magento/
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    Quote Originally Posted by hooternanny View Post
    can't upload the video, it is an african lion hunt where the lion charges. perhaps you've seen it.

    the bullet you show looks somewhat like what i use typically. i think "nosler partition". are you familiar with those and are they structured similarly. AND, do you have a therory as to why the NF round did so well in your test
    The Nosler Partition is not a bonded bullet. The front part of the bullet is standard cup core design and what makes it a killer is that if it does shed the front part of the bullet due to violent impact on bone or muscle the back have still remains intact due to the partition. The NF is a much better design bonded concept of the TBBC. The Grooves make the difference and the manufacturing process assures good accuracy. The the front part is taped out and filled with lead that is bonded to the rest of the copper bullet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRDATR View Post
    Thats all F&D but when was the last time you shot something worthy of that round at 10 yds? Not giving you crap (maybe a little) but it's not a very good evaluation of performance.
    I think the valid point of the test is, as Beartooth said, he "purposely got this close to see it the bullet would hold up close at these velocities." And I find the results useful. When hunting anything big, many think you need a partitioned or mono-metal bullet, but BT's test suggests that the NF will hold up well even at pretty high velocities. The point is, if the NF bullet holds up at a 3,200 fps impact, it should hold together at any slower impact. If you tested it out to longer range at a 500-fps slower velocity, whatever the results, it wouldn't tell you much about whether the bullet would hold together at the highest velocity it might produce on a nearby animal.

    Bearthooth, is it hard getting those velocities out of your 300 WM? You're almost getting 300 Wby factory velocities.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarineHawk View Post
    I think the valid point of the test is, as Beartooth said, he "purposely got this close to see it the bullet would hold up close at these velocities." And I find the results useful. When hunting anything big, many think you need a partitioned or mono-metal bullet, but BT's test suggests that the NF will hold up well even at pretty high velocities. The point is, if the NF bullet holds up at a 3,200 fps impact, it should hold together at any slower impact. If you tested it out to longer range at a 500-fps slower velocity, whatever the results, it wouldn't tell you much about whether the bullet would hold together at the highest velocity it might produce on a nearby animal.

    Bearthooth, is it hard getting those velocities out of your 300 WM? You're almost getting 300 Wby factory velocities.
    Not with the NF because the grooves do as advertised, they reduce pressure. I used my same MRP load for the NF 180gr SS as I did for my Barnes TTSX and had no more expansion on the base than the TTSX and the primer showed even less pressure signs. My load for the TTSX is 1% below book max. On top of getting better velocities the NF was 6.789" in accuracy.
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    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    Not with the NF because the grooves do as advertised, they reduce pressure. I used my same MRP load for the NF 180gr SS as I did for my Barnes TTSX and had no more expansion on the base than the TTSX and the primer showed even less pressure signs. My load for the TTSX is 1% below book max. On top of getting better velocities the NF was 6.789" in accuracy.
    ok, i understand the grooves, less resistance on the riffling and higher velocities. i have never owned, but maybe someday, a weatherby as another poster mentioned. but the idea, as seen in the op, that the bullet rolls back upon itself and stays together at these high velocities, i get it. about this subject there is little i know, but you got me intrigued. and as it stands, i think i am going to have to try some north fork rounds. as word of mouth goes, most i have been involved with use what i use or have upgraded to it from what they had. after searching i see many others believe in these north fork rounds. and when hunting, if i have to DLP a grizz, having nf would make me feel so much better. what a intresting post for me, particularly since i know so little about the subject.


    if you don't mind my asking, what does the accuracy 6.789" mean. where does that number come from?
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    Quote Originally Posted by hooternanny View Post
    ok, i understand the grooves, less resistance on the riffling and higher velocities. i have never owned, but maybe someday, a weatherby as another poster mentioned. but the idea, as seen in the op, that the bullet rolls back upon itself and stays together at these high velocities, i get it. about this subject there is little i know, but you got me intrigued. and as it stands, i think i am going to have to try some north fork rounds. as word of mouth goes, most i have been involved with use what i use or have upgraded to it from what they had. after searching i see many others believe in these north fork rounds. and when hunting, if i have to DLP a grizz, having nf would make me feel so much better. what a intresting post for me, particularly since i know so little about the subject.


    if you don't mind my asking, what does the accuracy 6.789" mean. where does that number come from?
    It means that my group size is barely over half and inch in size, basically a half inch group at 100 yds. Anything under 1 1/4" is a decent hunting load accuracy but I like my hunting loads to be under and inch, but that is just me.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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    so, that is the standard for measuring the grouping. nice group for sure
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    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    It means that my group size is barely over half and inch in size, basically a half inch group at 100 yds. Anything under 1 1/4" is a decent hunting load accuracy but I like my hunting loads to be under and inch, but that is just me.
    You mean 0.6789"?

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    yeah, thats probably what he means.

    300 wby i have heard is a finer weapon than my old trusty 300 wm savage. i don't know cause i have never owned one, but a partner of mine did 15+ yrs ago. i guess that wby gets higher velocity? is that correct?

    the grouping on my savage has been very interesting. from the factory, out of the box, it was on paper all the way out to 100 yards. however, it seems the 4th round strays high and left about 2''. i know it's not likely the weapon, more so it is probably me. not sure what i am doing. but the grouping, before my shoulder gets mad, is very tight. when at the range in the beginning some rounds were robinhooding (a bow hunting term i know), so i had to look close to make sure. the group spreads out to within max 3" at 200yrds even with the stray 4th round.


    straight out of the box it has been very accurate, and it has only been adjusted once in 10 years. i have a 3X9 leuopold and i can tell you it sure changed me from my lever action 30-30 brush gun days. i never though i would be confident enough to take a 300yrd shot, but i did and it was dead on. i think perhaps because somewhere i had looked at a ballistics chart and had an idea how much it would drop.


    i used to go to the range often, about once a week was perfect. gave my shoulder time to heal. i would put about 30 rounds out and thats it. practice shooting quick shots with my rifle, and just down right got proficent.


    however, even though it is still my old trusty, trust it like no other, i think i need a new 300 or 308, just because i need a new gun. ok, not need but want. sorry if it feels like thread jacking. i get excited, and the north fork rounds well, this is the first i have heard of them. 300wby has been on my mind.
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  18. #18

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    Very impressive Mike. Thanks for the testing and the visuals.

    In your friend's tests, did he really load that 180gr NF to 1900fps MV or was that captured further downrange?

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by ANGCorsair View Post
    Very impressive Mike. Thanks for the testing and the visuals.

    In your friend's tests, did he really load that 180gr NF to 1900fps MV or was that captured further downrange?
    He load it all distances from media were 12 yds
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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    Quote Originally Posted by hooternanny View Post
    yeah, thats probably what he means.

    300 wby i have heard is a finer weapon than my old trusty 300 wm savage. i don't know cause i have never owned one, but a partner of mine did 15+ yrs ago. i guess that wby gets higher velocity? is that correct?
    The 300Wby can drive a bullet faster but I would not say it is a finer cartridge, just a faster one.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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