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Thread: .270 v .308 for youth

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default .270 v .308 for youth

    I have been letting my 10 yo shoot my .223 this summer to get used to a bolt action for caribou hunting this fall. Lately I have had him shooting my .270 Win, but the LOP is awkward for him. I have been looking at youth models at SW and found a youth Weatherby Vanguard in both .308 and .270 for a reasonable price. They also have a youth Remington 7mm.08 which seemed dandy to me... until I looked at the price of the ammo! I'm leaning toward the .308 right now because the ammo is so reasonable and common, but love the .270 Win for its ballistics. Don't want to start a pissing contest, but I could use a LITTLE input on your experiences with kids shooting these calibers.

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    My niece and daughter use my .243. I was real worried how my daughter would handle it because she is real skinny, and flinches at things every once in a while, but she has been doing great with it. My niece shot a moose with it last year, and I have shot several caribou with it over the years. Great all around gun.

    I have no experience with the .270 or 308, but thought I would throw a shout out to the .243.

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    Well just for ease of ammo i would go with the 270. You already own one and then there is also no way you can mix up the rounds. Me and my father both shot 270's until i moved out and i decided that my wife shoots my 270 better then i do. So i went out and got a 300 WM TC encore pro hunter. That will give me the ability to have diffrent guns for diffrent uses. I know that my 270 has killed everything in north america except a griz and a desert big horn.

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    In similar weight rifles recoil is same/same. On game performance is going to be as close as the proverbial "two peas in a pod." For my part, if I were limited to factory ammo I'd be a dedicated .308 Winchester man. Ask the kid which he'd rather have; perhaps one sounds "cooler" than the other and that'd be as good of a reason as any to select one over the other...
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    I agree with 1Cor15:19 as far as factory ammo options. I just bought my daughter a 7mm08, I reload so the ammo cost isn't that bad. The reason I chose that over the .308 is the reduced recoil, obviously your son can probably handle the extra recoil a bit better so I wouldn't worry about it. The .308 has been around a long time and has probably taken all the game that you would go after. The ammo options are plenty and you can pretty much find them anywhere. The ballistics is not something I would worry about unless you are getting out beyond 3-400 yards for your shots. Inside 300 the difference isn't going to be noticiable on any animal you are going to hunt.

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    I have shot both and they both have a noticable kick. That's fine for shooting at a critter. Not so fine at the range.
    Forum member, BRNBR just posted a couple days ago of his kids success with the 223 on bou. Let your boy use that.
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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    I saw that. I know that guys do it all over Alaska, but IMO too iffy. I once saw a bull caribou on the lower Nushagak refuse to die after being shot with a bullet each from a .30.30, .30.06 and some other round... can't remember what. All neck and head shots at less than 100 yds. It had a will to live. A .243 is the smallest I would feel comfortable with him shooting, but to each his own.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    I saw that. I know that guys do it all over Alaska, but IMO too iffy. I once saw a bull caribou on the lower Nushagak refuse to die after being shot with a bullet each from a .30.30, .30.06 and some other round... can't remember what. All neck and head shots at less than 100 yds. It had a will to live. A .243 is the smallest I would feel comfortable with him shooting, but to each his own.
    IMO the neck and head shots are the problem there, not the bullet. Lung a bou with a .223 and it's all over but the hard work. If you're concerned about it, just shoot a smaller bou, but even a big one has thin ribs and skin and a partition or TSX will likely go in and out. I would venture a guess that the .223 has killed more caribou in this state than any other single round in the last 30 years.

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    I would say let him pick. 270 and 308 ammo is easy to come by. If you think you'll be taking longer shots I'd go with the 308 for more downrange energy but either would do fine. It doesn't matter what caliber you go with. I've seen a lot of animals react differently with diffrent bullets so to say that a 308 will kill a sheep, caribou or whatever any easier than a 270 just isn't true. 308 can be accurate to 600yds and beyond so to get a 270 because some may say it shoots flatter and has better long range accuracy is no reason to go with 270. If he shoots a 308 better than a 270 then he will be more accurate with that. Get what fits him and what he likes.
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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tyrex13 View Post
    IMO the neck and head shots are the problem there, not the bullet. Lung a bou with a .223 and it's all over but the hard work. If you're concerned about it, just shoot a smaller bou, but even a big one has thin ribs and skin and a partition or TSX will likely go in and out. I would venture a guess that the .223 has killed more caribou in this state than any other single round in the last 30 years.
    I would venture that you are correct; but I'd also submit that that bullet has contributed to wanton waste more than any other round as well.

    Thanks all, for the input gentlemen. I will probably let him choose based on what he hefts best. He hasn't yet shot a .308, and I don't have one for him to try, so it will probably be a feel and aesthetics decision.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    What type of ammo did you see that led you to the conclusion that 7mm-08 is so expensive? My wife primarily shoots 140 grain Core-Lokt bullets, and they're not any more expensive than my 30-06 Core-Lokts. We did pick up a box of Federal ammo loaded with some Barnes bullets that were considerably more expensive, but the green and yellow boxes don't seem too bad to me.

    If you ever make it up this way with your boy, you're more than welcome to borrow one of our youth-sized 7mm-08 rifles. I'd be happy to bring one down there for him to shoot as well, though I don't know if I'll be making it down to the Peninsula again this fall.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    What type of ammo did you see that led you to the conclusion that 7mm-08 is so expensive? My wife primarily shoots 140 grain Core-Lokt bullets, and they're not any more expensive than my 30-06 Core-Lokts. We did pick up a box of Federal ammo loaded with some Barnes bullets that were considerably more expensive, but the green and yellow boxes don't seem too bad to me.

    If you ever make it up this way with your boy, you're more than welcome to borrow one of our youth-sized 7mm-08 rifles. I'd be happy to bring one down there for him to shoot as well, though I don't know if I'll be making it down to the Peninsula again this fall.
    I asked the clerk at SW to show me what he had, and compared to .308, it was pricey. Tell me about your choice of the 7mm-08 Brian.

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    Member Ak Bird Brain's Avatar
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    I may be biased here, I received my first .308 from my father after my first successful caribou hunt 25 years ago. Never owned or shot a .270. There isn't anything in Alaska that I would hesitate to go after with my .308. If he's a bit gun shy on the recoil you could consider a 7.62x39. Its gotten to be a popular enough round thanks to the surplus of SKS's. Both my boys hunt spring bears with me, one carries a mini 30, the other my old .308.
    If you'd like to get together sometime I'll bring them out so he can give them both a try.
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    I asked the clerk at SW to show me what he had, and compared to .308, it was pricey. Tell me about your choice of the 7mm-08 Brian.
    We went with the 7mm-08 on the advice of a clerk at Boondock Sporting Goods here in Eagle River, and while I honestly don't have a ton of experience with the .308 (my first two animals were taken with it when I was 11 and 13, but nothing since), I have been tickled with our two rifles in that caliber. We bought one Remington Model 7 Youth for my wife, and after falling in love with it, we ended up buying a Model 700 Youth for my nephews, niece, and eventually for my sons once the cousins outgrow it. It's a very accurate little gun, and better yet, it feels only slightly more rough than shooting a .22lr. With the recoil pad that came installed on both rifles, they really are very, very tame and a great rifle for stepping newer shooters up to a big game caliber. For all I know, the very same might be true of the .270 and .308 - all I can speak to is what I know, and I've been very impressed with the 7mm-08 thus far.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Hmmm. wheels are turning. To add to the mix, my middle son has offered back to me (was once mine and then his older brother's) a sporterized Swedish Mauser in 6.5x5 with 80 rounds of ammo. I used it for caribou when I lived out in Dillingham many years ago, and even took off the head of a ptarmigan with it once at 100 yds. But the 7mm-08 is sounding gooder and gooder.

    Russian... hadn't even considered that. This is getting harder!

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    sayak,
    You couldn't go wrong with any of the 3 calibers mentioned. I suspect the clerk showed you a box of premium 7-08 which would be higher priced. But so would the 308 and 270's. What is most important is to have a rifle that fits your sons physique. Anything with a too long or short "lop" is going to be difficult to handle.
    The sporterized 6.5x55 sounds great! It has family history and if it fits him........

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    I will add this. The Remington 700 SPS Youth 7-08 I bought for my daughter at Sportsmans for $425 is the most accurate out of the box rifle we have purchased in years. It has been amazing. We also handload, but I have bought 7-08 in 140gr Coreloks in the $22 a box price range lately. My daughter handloads her own with 120gr Noslers over 39.5 grns of IMR4064 for a very like recoiling super accurate load.
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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    I will add this. The Remington 700 SPS Youth 7-08 I bought for my daughter at Sportsmans for $425 is the most accurate out of the box rifle we have purchased in years. It has been amazing. We also handload, but I have bought 7-08 in 140gr Coreloks in the $22 a box price range lately. My daughter handloads her own with 120gr Noslers over 39.5 grns of IMR4064 for a very like recoiling super accurate load.
    Doug, were you able to discern the make of the scope on the Remmy package? The young clerk insisted it was Remington also, because it had the logo on the adjuster covers! I suspect Bushnell.

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    ; but I'd also submit that that bullet has contributed to wanton waste more than any other round as well.
    You are blaming an inanimate object, a particular cartridge, for the outcome of human actions. Kind of like gun control advocates blame guns for crime. Truth is, most any caliber can be used improperly. There are plenty of instances of the 223 being used properly and successfully to take down big game.

    Aside from that....................I certainly would agree with a choice of 7mm-08 for a youngster.

    One more suggestion tho. Instead of investing in a firearm for a few hundred..............invest in reloading equipment. You and your son can load your 223, 270, and 6.5 for what you want them to do.
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    .270's can be hand leaded down to a very manageble recoil for anyone to shoot and still have plenty of performance. I have a shot them a lot over the years and have had my 11 year old shoo them as well and he doesn't seem to mind the recoil. If you are interested I have a .270 in a savage that has only been shoot to sight it in. I would make you a good deal since it is for a kid. Plus you can buy ammo off the shelf from 110 grain to 150 with 130 having good performance and lower recoil.

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