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Thread: Is your dog protective?

  1. #1
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Default Is your dog protective?

    My wife is dogsitting for friend of ours. Their dog is a lightly built 3 or 4 yr old male husky mix. He's a good dog but a little skittish--he was an abused rescue. My 10 month old Chessie pup Terra and he were introduced months ago and get along fine. They run and play-chase each other but whenever there's a doggie social faux pas she yields.

    At home she does bark at the door, but not that spastic rat-dog bark. She has a clear, measured warning bark. I don't discourage this. In fact she gets a "good girl" when when I come "to assume command". I post her at the top of the stairs and then answer the door. The guard instinct is one of the traits I like about this breed.

    She's pretty well socialized and not at all dominant with other dogs. Or so we thought.

    Terra will not let our friends' dog into our bedroom. She doesn't growl or snap, she just blocks the doorway like a hockey goalie. She also throws a shoulder, pushes him into the wall and down the hall then posts back at the threshold.

    So far I don't see a problem with this but I could be creating a monster. Do any of your dogs do anything similar

    (and here's a recent pic of my baby)

    Eklutna sedge.jpg
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  2. #2

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    Your doing the right thing by saying 'good girl' when she barks. So many dogs get scolded for barking when they are just trying to help!
    My boxer is a trained guard dog and she will bark, but I never let it get excessive. Boxers are not big barkers in the first place, generally speaking, their presence is usually intimidating enough. If the barking drives you nuts PM me and I can tell you some ways to deal with that.
    The bedroom is a different story. It's not her room and if you start giving her the idea that she is boss you will have trouble down the line with dominance. You do not see aggression in puppies, it first shows up as dominance, then becomes aggresion over time. Really let her know that you are in control and everything is just fine. Correct her if she tries to block your door, or anything in your house for that matter.

    I love hearing about your dog Erik, you have some lucky girls!

  3. #3
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    We've had to go through a few hoops to manage our 4 dogs. As far as protective of our home, Daisy, a Great Dane/Greyhound is protective. I think if someone burst in the front door she'd be in front of me. I hope. Lucy the Lab and Morgan the Saluki Sled dog stay in the background. I don't really know about the doodle yet. He gets in so much trouble all the time he checks in with me before he does something bad. He will back Daisy up if she barks. As far as protective of their space, toys, food, and humans the Saluki is the most annoying. He'll slap the other dogs if he wants their spot, or do a little slight of hand, like bark at the door, the other dog gets up, Morgan takes his place.
    I monitor feeding time because Daisy has attacked over her food being simply being coveted. I'm Queen "B" in the middle of the feeding and I expect a problem if I walk away. So I wait until they are done and remove the bowls. When each new dog was added to the family all the toys were picked up and I had to enforce a no petting rule for a few days. Erik I think your dog is protecting her space. When Daisy does stuff like that I make her step aside. I'm the boss, not her, and make her go lay down. Then she pouts. You might have to watch that it doesn't escalate, sometimes we have a short argument. Just like people I think a couple of our dogs build up resentment and there will be a short bark, growl, nip. I make sure they know that's not acceptable. Sometimes a time out in the crate helps.

  4. #4
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Thanks for the feedback!

    I haven't witnesed it myself. This was relayed to me from my wife and we're done dog sitting. She wasn't aggressive with the other dog--they played and napped together and the other dog was free to go anywhere else in the house but for whatever reason she would not let him in our bedroom. Again, not aggressive just insistent. It didn't take too much of this blocking for the other dog to back off, and there was no growling. She's never tried anything like that with either my wife or I and I've never seen or heard of another dog doing that so I was curious.

    I think that as long as this doesn't escalate I'll let it be.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  5. #5
    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    You asked if our k9's are protective, judge for yourself
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
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