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Thread: Are Tracks a good idea?

  1. #1
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Default Are Tracks a good idea?

    Im seriously thinking about plunking down the 6 grand for the track kit for my sportsman 6x6. Im already thinking about another winter of fidling around trying to get my snowmachine to work. Or I could just bypass that whole operation and use my 6 wheeler. A new snowmachine is 10 grand these days so the tracks are cheaper in that respect.

    I dont need to go fast. Just need to go everywhere I want. One thing I like about a wheeler on tracks is they seem like they would really be able to go through the alders good. Dont need to worry about a stick getting caught on the ski and stopping you.

    Also, tracks would be cool in the bogs during hunting season.

    Am I going to be dissapointed in the tracks? Do they really do that good in deep snow? What about climbing hills in the snow. I see some people complain about the polaris track kits and maybe the quality isnt good.

  2. #2
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    I'd love to hear what others have to say. I assume you're talking about the badass triangle-shaped tracks all around, or are you talking about triangles in the front and polaris tracks around the 4x4s? What year is your 6x6?

    Tim

  3. #3
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Im talking about the ones polaris makes for my 2010 bigboss. They have the triangles up front and the back axles are incorperated into one track. Polaris advertises 80% top speed retained. Hopefully that also translates to only a 20% decrease in the mileage from a tank of gas. Right now i only get 10mpg on optimal conditions. I dont think I would go for tracks if they brought the mileage down to 4-5.

  4. #4
    Member jkb's Avatar
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    For 6 grand a handy guy like yourself could build or buy a nice little track rig.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

  5. #5
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    I've got a set on a 4wheeler. Tatous 4s. I like'em but i'd bet alot of people wouldn't. Top speed 39 on hard pack, but figure 15-20 mph for cruising around.
    I get 20 mpg or so on wheels, and 5-8 on tracks. They get around better than I thought in the snow.
    Completely different than a snowmachine.
    Check out some places it'll go.
    http://www.trackshare.com/forum/showthread.php?t=44744
    I use the same user name, go thru a couple of pages and you can see some of the pictures I posted.
    "The older I get, the better I was."

  6. #6
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    All depends what you want to go through. I guarantee a $6000 used sled will go through more than a tracked 6x6 would ever dream of doing...and do it faster and warmer to boot.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  7. #7
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    I used to have tracks for my before I got my sled. An ATV with tracks and a sled are entirely different machines.

    Sled:
    High horsepower
    High speed
    Much lighter
    Able to sidehill
    Much less storage/hauling capacity than an ATV.

    Tracked ATV
    - Torque but no horsepower. Compare the horsepower of a typical ATV (30-40 HP), versus a sled (around 100 HP). To climb a steep hill with a sled, you hit the gas and blast your way up, using momentum to carry you through the loose stuff. On a tracked ATV, you usually first have to gear down to "low", and then claw your way up at low speed. If you loose traction, you will likely get stuck.
    - VERY heavy (like twice the weight of a sled). This can be a real problem in crusty or powder snow, as you will punch through where sleds have managed to skim across.
    - Wider than a sled, meaning that you may not fit on some snowmachine trails.
    - Will probably have a winch, which is handy in getting yourself out of simple messes.
    - You have no idea what stuck is until you get a tracked ATV stuck someplace, particularly someplace without a handy tree to connect your winch to!
    - The low pressure tires are an integral part of your ATV's suspension. Replace them with tracks, and your ride becomes much rougher.
    - One place tracks do shine over a sled, however, is areas with marginal snow and climbing over obstacles (such as downed trees or exposed boulders). For rolling tracks, there isn't much different between snow, mud, or gravel (for short distances).
    - As others have said, despite the marketing BS from the track manufacturers, figure that your speed and fuel mileage will be half what you get with tires. Therefore, your fuel range is also halved. Be very skeptical of that 80 percent of top speed claim--if nothing else, remember the horsepower issue.

    Understand that there are all-season tracks, and snow-only tracks. Kind of like the difference between all-season tires and snow tires. All season tracks have much less lug height than snow tracks, and thus are more likely to get stuck in the snow.

    So, for just cruising around, sleds are a much better choice. However, if you are using your 6*6 as a workhorse for hauling loads on hard packed snow in an area with wide trails, and you either ride alone or with snowmachiners who ride very slowly, tracks might be worth considering.

  8. #8
    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    if you want a tracked rig, BUY A TRACKED RIG! period. you could build one also. that would be a good option also. but to buy add on tracks for your polaris is just a expensive disappointment. use your money wisely. you can resell a used track rig, but reselling some cheap add on tracks for your polaris has little value. and its not a track rig to begin with.
    Semper Fi!

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