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Thread: Round Nose Bullets

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Default Round Nose Bullets

    Just curious if there are still some fans/users of round nose bullets? Was on the Hornady site and looking to see what they have in .284 and .308 - yes there are still some...
    Any hunters out there using RN ?

    I think one of my 280's with a 175gn RN would be pretty potent on deer and hogs and???
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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    I still use them occasionally (416 RM, 358 Win, 6.5x55, etc.). If I'm confident the range is going to be under 200 yards, I actually prefer them. IME they are more consistent terminal performers than their spitzer counterparts and give up so little in external ballistics as to be unnoticeable at modest ranges. Long live the RN!
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    I really like the 160 gr RN in 6.5x55.

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    I'm with 1Cor15:19 in really liking them, but I use them in lots of calibers. Certainly not for long range shooting, but at modest velocities inside 200 they're dandies. But dont' tell anyone! The current craze in monolithic spitzers has made them a dog on the market, and it's easy to find really good deals! My most used are in 25, 7mm, 30, 35 and 375 calibers. BTW- That Hornady 175 RN (as well as their 154) is a real snot swatter on deer, black bear and such at 7x57 velocities, whether modern or low pressure versions. Call it 2300-2700fps and you're in the park.

    Here's more insights- When it comes to solids, RN or FN are vastly preferred because spitzers tend to wander all over inside an animal rather than boring in a straight line.

  5. #5

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    I use RN's in my 35rem, the 200gr CLRN. Have used the .277/150 CLRN and loved it. And just ordered 100 ct Hawk .358", 225gr Round Tips in .030" jackets for my 358win. I think these should work fine in my 358win for deer and black bear. I like the exrta fast expantion of the RN/RT bullets and their strong mid/lower jackets for bullet integraty.

    The accubond was for a sleck profile but frankly I could use a accubond in RN for the 358win/225gr, 270win/150gr for most of my hunting with 250 yards no problem. I bet the long bullet users in 7mm, 6.5mm would love them too.

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    I alway thought the 154gr RN would the ticket for black bear in a 7mm08.

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I'm with 1Cor15:19 in really liking them, but I use them in lots of calibers. Certainly not for long range shooting, but at modest velocities inside 200 they're dandies. But dont' tell anyone! The current craze in monolithic spitzers has made them a dog on the market, and it's easy to find really good deals! My most used are in 25, 7mm, 30, 35 and 375 calibers. BTW- That Hornady 175 RN (as well as their 154) is a real snot swatter on deer, black bear and such at 7x57 velocities, whether modern or low pressure versions. Call it 2300-2700fps and you're in the park.

    Here's more insights- When it comes to solids, RN or FN are vastly preferred because spitzers tend to wander all over inside an animal rather than boring in a straight line.
    I would think they would be good for shoulder shots on moosies also - chugging right thru....
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Art Alphin has a very good write up on his A-Square site and he prefers them for shots on game out to surprising distance. I've used them in the past without any quarrels and I had one rifle that was just scary accurate with them.

    I do think many of us are unknowingly loading spendy long range projectiles without any real need to shoot long range. What's a couple inches difference in elevation at 300yds? Most of us just aren't that accurate in the field and don't really need to be. I think BrownBear's comments are spot on- spitzers tend to veer off course in critters and RN ammo just punches through- that's likely the secret behind the 220gr RN 30-06's spectactcular record. Deep and reliable penetration at modest velocity.

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    I think BrownBear's comments are spot on- spitzers tend to veer off course in critters and RN ammo just punches through- that's likely the secret behind the 220gr RN 30-06's spectactcular record. Deep and reliable penetration at modest velocity.
    FWIW, BrownBear's comments were in regard to solids not expanding bullets.
    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Here's more insights- When it comes to solids, RN or FN are vastly preferred because spitzers tend to wander all over inside an animal rather than boring in a straight line.
    Once expansion begins spitzers are no longer spitzers and will look more similar to an expanded RN. IME there is more consistent terminal results with expanding RN projectiles than similarly constructed expanding spitzers.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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    Never underestimate the RN bullets. They were used by all militaries until the mid 20's and there were lots of graves filled by RN projectiles. The 30-30 and many other lever actions have taken nearly every animal on earth with RN projectiles, heck even cast lead bullets fall into this catagory. On animals RN bullets don't give up anything inside 250 yds.Impacting velocities may be slightly reduced, but animals don't seem to notice any difference.
    As mentioned earlier the more modern space-age bullets have caused the RN cup & core style bullets to be bargains in the market place.
    I currently have many calibers loaded with RN projectiles basically for close-up shooting (under 200 yds); 416 Taylor, 338 WM, 45-90 , 30-06, 6.5x55, 7x57. AND no failures yet.
    The newer space-age bullets do however tend to work better and more reliably with the new higher velocity calibers. unless velocities are reduced to control expansion of RN bullets.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    FWIW, BrownBear's comments were in regard to solids not expanding bullets. Once expansion begins spitzers are no longer spitzers and will look more similar to an expanded RN. IME there is more consistent terminal results with expanding RN projectiles than similarly constructed expanding spitzers.
    Yeah, I was referring to RN solids and straight penetration. I have limited experience with Spitzer "solids" other than a few experiments in my youth with 06 ball ammo and deer. Egad....

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    I like using RN probjectiles. In fact I use them almost exclusively for my hunting loads in my 35 Whelen. I was having trouble getting the accuracy I was after when using bullets if Spitzer profile in the 250gr weight due to the slow twist coupled with my short barrel length. I switched to 250 RN bullets, which are shorter for their weight, and my groups tightened considerably. Since making that switch I have found that some of my other rifles shoot slightly better when using RN bullets at the same speed as their Spitzer counterparts.

    I have only taken game with RNs in the 35 Rem and Whelen, the 45/70, and the 458 Win. But the results have been the same in each case, lightning like kills. This is not to say that RNs kill better, as I've taken alot of game with pointy bullets that dropped hard as well but so far I'm 100% with round noses as far as one shot drops go. I don't let the trajectory issues bother me any at all, I've only taken 3 or 4 game animals past 300yds. Only one of them was much past that and one of the others was taken using a RN. Long live blunt bullets.

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    Round nose bullets have proven to be very effective if kept within there velocity range. Many rounds have gained their excellent reputations using RNs. The 35Rem,30/30,7x57,6.5x55 and others all kill very well using RN bullets. I'm thinking the 400gr Hornady RN from my 416Rem will probably take out any critter on the planet within 200 yds. Might want to switch to solids for rhino and such but the RN part should work just fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    ...within 200 yds.
    That's a pretty common theme here, isn't it? Guys get all spun up loading for real long shooting, but how many shots are actually past 200? I certainly went through a phase of long shooting and took more than a few animals to 400 and beyond. But I've moved past that and am a whole lot more interested in stalking closer. Heck, the last half dozen animals I've taken were shot inside 50 yards using round balls from traditional muzzleloaders.

    No big sweat either way. Guys should use what will do the job for them in their chosen way of hunting. But for anyone who's not long-shooting, RN's are fruitful ground to explore.

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    I dusted off my old bow last year and went up the haul road with some friends. Got two Bou. One long shot, 46yds, and one Hail Mary shot at 58yds. Getting that close to the animals I want to take is to me what hunting is. Shooting something at 500+ yds is good shooting but it isn't hunting to me. I can't remember shooting any animal with a pointy bullet that wouldn't have been just as dead using a RN. Although I don't normally hunt with RNs I frequently hunt with flat nose cast which kill very well within range limits. I'm not against modern technology (laser range finders are neat) but some of the new stuff costs more than it's worth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    That's a pretty common theme here, isn't it? Guys get all spun up loading for real long shooting, but how many shots are actually past 200? I certainly went through a phase of long shooting and took more than a few animals to 400 and beyond. But I've moved past that and am a whole lot more interested in stalking closer. Heck, the last half dozen animals I've taken were shot inside 50 yards using round balls from traditional muzzleloaders.

    No big sweat either way. Guys should use what will do the job for them in their chosen way of hunting. But for anyone who's not long-shooting, RN's are fruitful ground to explore.
    You are very correct BB, and its not just bullets - look at all the new calibers, adding AI's to std calibers for that xtra 100 fps. Ya grab a reloading manual and still 2500 - 2900 fps still covers tha majority of loads in any caliber. I think we "think" too much often!
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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