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Thread: Stoopid Ruger

  1. #1
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    Default Stoopid Ruger

    This gun is a Ruger 77, the older version with the Tang Safety. This gun belongs to my Trusty Wife, and itís a 7x57, but that doesnít matter. The stock has been shortened for her, and redone/slimmed down.. It looks like a Custom Rifle/Stock.

    Iím getting it ready for hunting season, and working the Bolt, when I noticed that although it cocks on opening, it UNCOCKS when I close the bolt.

    I hadda few anxious moments, but I finally took it apart, and found a problem with the TRIGGER. Nope, it wasnít adjustment. There is a PIN that the Trigger hinges on, and that PIN was out part way to one side. It didnít come out because it was stopped by the stock, or if you will, the ďtrigger slotĒ in the stock.

    Nonetheless, it appears the trigger was binding, and not released enough for to hold the firing pin in the bolt back when I closed the bolt. (It was like if I pulled the trigger when I closed the bolt, which UNcocks it.)

    I pushed the pin back in line and gun worked fine, UNTIL it came out AGAIN. What to do? I dunno, but I put Blue Lock-Tight on both ends of that PIN. I pushed it out part way and put it on the pin where it stuck out on one side, and in the hole on the other side where the Pin was pushed in slightly. Then I pushed it back in line, and let it dry.

    So far, this seems to have solved the problem, but Iím wondering what is SPOSE to hold that Pin in there. (Is it Friction? A Press Fit?.)

    And WHY, that purported Genius Bill Ruger, would Design, Manufacture, and SELL what at this point, seems to me, to be, a PP, Mickey Mouse, Prone to trouble,,, way to make a trigger.

    Beyond that, I theenk I might need a better FIX. Anybody know about this? Have any INFO, or suggestions? To share???

    Thanks if you do.

    Smitty of the North
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  2. #2
    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Dunno. Replaced the stock trigger with a Timney years ago on my tang safety M77. Haven't looked at my gun, but if it is like Mauser triggers, they have that same pin. You might try peening both ends (riveting is another word for it) of the pin to keep it in place.

  3. #3
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
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    Normally that pin is staked in place. You might take a fine point punch and restake it on both sides to make sure she stays put.

    Chris

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    Quote Originally Posted by akgun&ammo View Post
    Normally that pin is staked in place. You might take a fine point punch and restake it on both sides to make sure she stays put.

    Chris
    OK, Thanks.

    I reckon, that's what I needed to know.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  5. #5

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    You could replace the pin with a split rolled pin which has a tension built in and would hold itself until drifted out of it's desired location with a punch.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

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  6. #6

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    Send it back to Ruger. They will fix/replace part(s) for you and it probably won't cost you a nickel other than to get the rifle to them.

  7. #7
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brav01 View Post
    You could replace the pin with a split rolled pin which has a tension built in and would hold itself until drifted out of it's desired location with a punch.
    Yup, or knurl one end of your pin with a file. Put pin on solid steel (like an anvil face) take edge of file to end of pin, apply pressure and roll pin with file . . . this indents the file teeth into the pin knurling it.
    Andy
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  8. #8
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    The course of action you take depends on what needs to be fixed. If the trigger pull was OK up to this point and the only problem is the cocking/un-cocking development that would be a different fix than problems with trigger pull developed into a another problem. I would remove the trigger pin with a punch or other object (nail ect.) that just fit the hole. Then I would look at the removed pin to make sure it is still round, not worn especially on one side of the pin due to the pin not being in its correct location, or egg shaped which could cause a difference in the way the trigger feels when pulled, or sloppy, if the pin can rotate. Round is a relative thing where a few thousands of an inch could be the difference between a tight crisp pull, an OK pull, or sloppy pull. Measure the center of the pin and the outside of the pin to see if there is a difference that is important. Also measure the center of the pin 2-3 times in different places to check for egg shape. If the pin is OK & the pull was OK replace the pin and use a fine center punch to stake the pin in place. Use the center punch to stake the pin housing into the pin with good support of the housing, not the pin into the housing. I would do 2 stakes on one side and 1 stake on the other side in case you need to remove the pin again in the future. Don't get carried away with the staking. Just enough to hold the pin in place. Knurling the end of the pin if not done correctly can cause raised edges that could change the pull or at the extreme end could raise a burr to the point that a pull of the trigger might cause the trigger not to return or only return part way.The pin is a plain bearing & needs to be treated as such. You may need a new pin in the long run. Returning the rifle to Ruger might get you a new pin if it was undersized to begin with. If it was a press fit in the housing with the clearance in the trigger hole that would be a reason why it can back out now. Depends on when you need the rifle & how much you want to go through to return it. Also the liability remains with the manufacturer and doesn't transfer to you if that is important. Replacing the pin with a split pin could also cause pull problems if the OD of the new pin is different or expands slightly more than the solid pin. The split part needs to be placed so it doesn't act like a slightly flat bearing surface. A roll pin would be better in that application still being prepared for the same problems. Good luck, carysguns

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