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Thread: backpack for bou

  1. #1

    Default backpack for bou

    Going Caribou hunting in two weeks.This will be my first Alaska hunt. I brought my Eberlestock J107 with me when I moved up, would this pack be good for bou? Would I be better off getting an frame pack to haul meat and gear? The J107 is great for deer, and elk quarters, but a caribou seems to be a little in between. What do you all use?

  2. #2
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    I am not sure what the J107 is so I won't comment on that, however I use a Barney Alaska Hunter pack and frame and it is the best pack I have ever owned.

  3. #3
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    I have never got to use the J107 for packing out a caribou, but I have packed and elk with it. The frame pack would allow you to haul more weight than the J107 but for the ankle breaking terrain that you will be crossing with the caribou (assuming you are on the tundra) the J107 will allow you to haul as much as you will want to carry at 1 time. The only problem that I found with the pack that i had was that the weight moved out behind you instead of up. This can be a crappy situation if you are coming downhill on slick terrain as the pack trys to pull you down backwards. When I was hauling out the elk there was snow on the mountain and I spent a lot of time on my but because I hit a slippery part and with the spike camp duffle zipped to the back and that much weight I couldn't keep my footing. Other than that, they are great packs and it shouldn't be a problem hauling it out. Not sure you could do it in one trip, but I personally wouldn't want to anyway.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by outrider View Post
    Going Caribou hunting in two weeks.This will be my first Alaska hunt. I brought my Eberlestock J107 with me when I moved up, would this pack be good for bou? Would I be better off getting an frame pack to haul meat and gear? The J107 is great for deer, and elk quarters, but a caribou seems to be a little in between. What do you all use?
    I hauled four caribou quarters in my J107 last year. That load was too much weight for the pack, even with the cinch straps the load swayed too much while walking across the tussocks which tended to throw me off balance on the uneven ground. Next caribou I hauled just two quarters back to camp, retrieved my frame pack and returned for the rest of the meat. Big difference. I like the J107 for a day pack while hunting. I handles one or two quarters fine, just realize it's not made for the big heavy loads. It'll work just fine if you're willing to make multiple pack trips from kill site to camp. Good luck!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by shearej View Post
    I hauled four caribou quarters in my J107 last year. That load was too much weight for the pack, even with the cinch straps the load swayed too much while walking across the tussocks which tended to throw me off balance on the uneven ground. Next caribou I hauled just two quarters back to camp, retrieved my frame pack and returned for the rest of the meat. Big difference. I like the J107 for a day pack while hunting. I handles one or two quarters fine, just realize it's not made for the big heavy loads. It'll work just fine if you're willing to make multiple pack trips from kill site to camp. Good luck!
    I think that's a good assesment concerning weight and terrain. The Eberlestock dragonfly has been a versatile pack for me, but there are limitations. It has handled whole deer, a boned out mountain goat, caribou quarters (two at a time preferred . . . . although there are probably some He-Man types who could do more with it), and a brown bear hide with skull just fine. I prefer not to use it with moose quarters, and would opt for a Barney's if I was living out of it for a week or more sheep hunting etc. I think it is popular in the lower 48 because you are rarely more than a day or two from a road or transportation. . . . and you are rarely hauling moose with it In that capacity and in similar circumstances in Alaska it should work just fine. Probably not a first choice though when it IS camp on your back. Since you already own one I suggest you give it a try this hunt and see how it works for you. It may be all YOU need. If you find that you want something with a bigger load capacity or something to sheep/goat hunt with then check out the Barney's. Good luck on your first Alaskan hunt!

  6. #6
    Member Mountain Man Jack's Avatar
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    The J107 is a great idea, but when any kind of substantial weight is loaded in it, with the zip on duffel the load becomes ridiculously unstable. I packed out a goat with it and fell several times due to the pack swinging around. I got rid of it as soon as I got home and picked up a barney's frame. I throw a dry bag on the frame for hiking in and use a small backpack strapped to it for day hunting. Haven't looked back since. The pads on the barney's frame are extremely nice when packing out a critter.

  7. #7
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    I've a Barney's frame pack and an older Just One by Eberlestock (J104). They are both fine packs for their intended purposes and I use them both, though not interchangeably. The Eberlestock will work just fine for 'bou, but be mindful of the way you strap the weight onto/into the pack. For a dedicated meat hauling pack I'll take the external frame pack every time, but as a back pack/day pack/meat hauler the "Just One" accomplishes each task admirably.
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