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Thread: Post favorite Bread Starter for my Mrs. :)

  1. #1
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    Question Post favorite Bread Starter for my Mrs. :)

    My wife wants to get into bread making and needs favorite recipes. Please share and post helpful hints too. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Member junkak's Avatar
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    -Using actual bread flour is a good start.

    -Fresh yeast is good.

    -You can make your own sourdough starter. Gotta luv Google™.

    -Once you get a few loaves under your belt (so to speak) the cracked grains from your local beer brewing store will rock your world.. Even a simple wheat sunflower seed loaf is good.

    -Yeast ,water and flour are the key ingredients and are individual in tastes.

    **** termination dust and your post are giving me the itch to make some cinnamon rolls!

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    I got a magazine from Barnes and Noble called "Homemade Bread". It is a great magazine chocked full of great recipes of a variety of breads, rolls, international breads, sourdough starter, etc. It also is a good resource for the bread maker on such things as flour selection, storage, yeasts, etc. Like Junkak said, once you get a few loaves under your belt, it'll be fun to venture out and try some different types of bread. I found too, that store bread just doesn't taste right after eating stuff made at home. PM me if you have any questions - I'd be glad to help. Chris

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    Member Jackson's Dad's Avatar
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    This is my favorite bread recipe:

    Alaska Backpack Mountain Bread
    - From Alaska Roadhouse Recipes

    4 cups whole wheat flour
    1 cup water
    3/4 cup brown sugar
    1/2 cup honey
    1/3 cup wheat germ
    1/3 cup vegetable oil
    1/4 cup sesame seeds
    1/4 cup molasses
    3 Tb. dry milk powder
    1-1/2 tsp. salt
    1-1/2 tsp. baking soda

    Mix all ingredients until smooth. Pour into greased 8" x 8" x 2" pan. Bake at 300 deg F for one hour, or until bread pulls away from pan. Cool and cut into 16 squares.

    I have had to vary the temps and cooking times depending on different ovens and elevations, and am cooking it at 305 degrees for 65 minutes in Fairbanks.

    This bread is really heavy and can be considered a meal. It will keep for two to three weeks in a Ziploc bag. Most of the ingredients can be found in the bulk bins at Freds. Hope you give it a try, I am hooked on it.

    Cheers,
    Jay
    “The mountains are calling and I must go.” - John Muir

    "Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

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    Great info! Thanks!

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    IMHO, the three best bread books for learning are:
    The Tassajara Bread Book, by Edward Espe Brown
    The Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book, by Laurel Robertson
    Bread Alone, by Daniel Leader and Judith Blahnik

    Adding to junkak's list, a few more pointers:
    -Temperature is the key ingredient in sourdough recipes! If your recipe isn't working, stick a thermometer in your ingredients, something is too hot or too cold.
    -Good bread only needs four ingredients: flour, water, starter (or yeast), plus salt. Don't overdo the salt but don't leave it out. (Never put salt in the starter though, always replenish your starter before adding salt.)
    -Fresh ingredients are better! White flour need not be fresh, and whole uncracked grains or seeds need not be fresh, but once cracked or ground, whole grains and flours need to be used fairly quickly before the oils go rancid.
    -Fermenting the dough by letting it rise overnight adds depth to the flavor. Put the dough in a cool place, punch it down by stirring with a wooden spoon every time you feed the wood stove. Use an extra large bowl since it might rise much higher than normal as it ferments.
    -Finally, I swear I'm not making this up, your bread really will rise higher if you play music!

  7. #7

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    I started a sourdough pot using a recipe out of the "Alaska Sourdough" book by Ruth Allman (bought it off Amazon). I've been making sourdough bread once or twice a week with it and pancakes/waffles every other week or so.

    The sourdough starter recipe is:

    Dump into the sourdough pot--
    2 cups thick potato water
    2 tbsp. sugar
    2 cups flour (more or less----I used regular white flour)

    Boil potatoes with jackets on until they fall to pieces. Lift skins out; mash potatoes making a puree. Cool. Add more water to make sufficient liquid, if necessary. Richer the potato water, richer the starter. Put all ingredients into pot. Beat until smooth, creamy batter. Cover. Set aside in warm place to start fermentation.

    Books says to use non-metal container for the pot and use wooden spoon (never metal) for stirring the sourdough. After three days, you should start seeing bubbles. I started using my starter after two weeks.

    Sourdough Bread
    1 cup sourdough
    1 pkg. yeast
    1 1/2 c. warm water
    6 cups flour (I use regular white flour)
    2 tbsp. sugar
    1/2 tsp. soda
    1/2 tsp salt

    Add yeast to warm water. Mix in sourdough, 4 cups of the flour, sugar, and salt. Beat well. Put in greased bowl and let rise until double. Mix soda in 1 cup flour. Add to original dough. Use remaining flour and knead until satiny and springy to the touch. Cut dough in half and make two loaves. Bake in 400 degree oven for 45 minutes.

    I cheat and use my bread machine to make the sourdough bread. I cut the above recipe in half, put everything in the bread machine pan, and program for 1 1/2 pound loaf. This makes the best bread!

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    If you're going to use whole wheat flour, add some lemon juice to your recipe (in place of a bit of the water). The acid will actually make a softer bread. Make sure when you're done kneading that you can window pane. This means that you hold the dough up and stretch it out. It should get semi-transparent before it breaks. Like a window pane. That's how you know it'll be good bread.

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    Default adding lemon juice

    Quote Originally Posted by Past Primitive View Post
    If you're going to use whole wheat flour, add some lemon juice to your recipe (in place of a bit of the water). The acid will actually make a softer bread. Make sure when you're done kneading that you can window pane. This means that you hold the dough up and stretch it out. It should get semi-transparent before it breaks. Like a window pane. That's how you know it'll be good bread.
    How much, approximately? I usually make a 2 pound loaf.

    Thanks for the tip; after I hear about how much, I'll try it!

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    Thumbs up Simple, basic French bread . .

    Turn your oven on at 350 for one minute, turn off

    3 1/2 cups unbleached bread flour
    1/4 tsp sugar
    2 1/4 tsp salt
    scant Tbs yeast
    1 1/3+ Cup very warm water
    *********************

    Mix, knead well, cover and let rise in warm oven until doubled; knock down, form loaf, slash top, let rise again, and bake for 20 minutes or so at 450 (I set a timer and rotate the loaf 180-degrees half-way through baking. Loaf is done when nicely browned or when an instant-read thermometer reads about 195 degrees)
    ********************************

    That's Julia Child's basic bread recipe. I use a Bosch machine* for kneading the bread. Usually substitute some whole wheat flour and/or rye flour for some of the unbleached, grinding** it fresh, and sometimes add a little olive oil, minced herbs, sunflower seeds, etc.

    *
    http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/Bosch_Universal_Plus_Mixer_MUM6N10UC.aspx
    ** http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/index.aspx#Nutrimill

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