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Thread: Stump removal

  1. #1
    Member Grayling Slayer's Avatar
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    Default Stump removal

    Any good ideas on clearing out stumps at a remote property?
    "I'd rather be fishing!"

  2. #2
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    The funnest way is to blast 'em...

    http://www.alaskapacificpowder.com/

    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Member Ak Bird Brain's Avatar
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    Dump honey on it and let the bears do all the work. If your not into baiting bears near your cabin get a pig. A fenced in pig will root a stump up in just a matter of days if you put its food around the base. Other than that its shovel, ax and a come along.
    Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day,
    Teach a man to fish and he'll also learn to drink, lie, and avoid the honey do list.

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Pour on the diesel, light a match, and get out the marshmallows....
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  5. #5
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    If they are shallow rooted spruce, a fourwheeler and a choker chain works well if you cut the tree off about 5' high and attach the choker up high, get a run and keep gunnin' it. If deeper rooted trees, a chainsaw, ax, and a hi lift jack with afformentioned ATV work about the best, unless you can get a hoe to the site

  6. #6
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I have been trying to find a way to get my stump grinder to my cabin and back without paying a barge fee...... it isn't working.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

  7. #7
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Sounds like you need a bigger boat
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  8. #8
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Or a hungry pet beaver...


    The fire idea sounds intriguing, but where I live you will start a real fire by doing that. Once you get the root system burning in a black spruce forest, you have started a problem you will not know how to fix or if you have fixed it...

  9. #9
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Sounds like you need a bigger boat
    Or a less remote cabin. It only weights 2000#. Vermeer SC352. 6 wheel drive with lockers. I could grind a path to the cabin I guess!
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtofak View Post
    Or a less remote cabin. It only weights 2000#. Vermeer SC352. 6 wheel drive with lockers. I could grind a path to the cabin I guess!
    Hmmm, I need to double check but I didn't see that on the DNR "generally allowed uses" pamphlet!

    My vote is to cut the trees, chop them up and surround the stump with the cut pieces. Then tarp the pile good and wait for a good week of solid rain to soak everything else in the area before burning them out one or two at a time.

  11. #11
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    If you are on the road system PLEASE don't try to burn a stump especially a huge cottonwood one. The last one that I ground out was a nasty nightmare that the guy tried to burn for 3 winters. It isn't that expensive to have one ground out, it is over quickly and you can move on to the next priority in life like hunting and fishing.

    If you are on the tundra. Remember that if you start a fire and it smolders over to your neighbors place and burns it down, you are responsible.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

  12. #12
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    A good come-along, a logging chain, and a Handyman jack. An old bar and chain on the saw to cut muddy roots is important as well. My wife cleared our cabin lot that way. Come-along to apply side pressure, lift with the handyman, a few more stroke on the come-along..... it works well. Two come-alongs so you can maintain pressure while you re-rig one or the other is really helpful. Sometimes the extra pulling power is a blessing, too.

  13. #13
    Member akriverunner's Avatar
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    Dirto where is your cabin?

  14. #14
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    Skip the chainsaw, corded or cordless sawzall with a demo blade! Just push it right down into the dirt.

  15. #15
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Or a less remote cabin. It only weights 2000#. Vermeer SC352. 6 wheel drive with lockers. I could grind a path to the cabin I guess!
    Bigger snowmachine I send out 2000# loads behind Skidoo Skandic WT's and Bearcats all the time

    In reality, Mr Pid's wife removes them the same way I used to.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  16. #16
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I ran into a guy ther other day that tried to use a chainsaw. He had a brand new Husky with a worn out chain and a stuck piston that looked 20 years old. He thought he would save money by doing it himself. When I told him that I could do the job for 1/4 the cost of the saw and be done in a couple hours, he said he had 2 weekends in it already. He was committed to doing the job himself to "Save Money". You should have seen his face when I asked him what he was going to do with the stump after it was out. He was going to pay someone to haul it off.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

  17. #17
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    Oops. I had meant to write "my wife and I". Something was lost in editing.

    Pulling stumps is rewarding work. These days I have power equipment to do the heavy chores and sometimes I think the old armstrong method was less work and more effective. Stumps give way slowly. The come-along and handyman suit their time schedule. You'll certainly do less damage to nearby healthy trees you want to keep if you pull stumps manually. Power winches and excavators take everything in their way.

    If you're cutting a tree and expect to pull the stump soon try to leave 4' or so above ground to give you leverage with the come-along. It helps!

  18. #18
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Oops. I had meant to write "my wife and I". Something was lost in editing.

    Pulling stumps is rewarding work. These days I have power equipment to do the heavy chores and sometimes I think the old armstrong method was less work and more effective. Stumps give way slowly. The come-along and handyman suit their time schedule. You'll certainly do less damage to nearby healthy trees you want to keep if you pull stumps manually. Power winches and excavators take everything in their way.
    You can surgically remove them with a grinder. It doesn't ruin the lawn and if you pay attention, you can avoid the roots of nearby trees. I have taken them out right next to concrete. Excavators and other heavy equipment is for before the structures are up and the area is landscaped or grassed.

    A 16" stump cut 4" high takes about 5 minutes of grinding.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

  19. #19
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    Can you fit that grinder into a Cub? I'm familiar with grinders but most of us don't drive to our cabins.

    People got along pretty well before they had gadgets like stump grinders. That's half the fun of having a cabin, to figure out how to get by with less.

  20. #20

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    The best method to use really depends on why you want the stumps pulled and on the area where you're pulling. So the first step is to ask yourself if each stump actually needs to be cleared out. Sometimes not pulling the stump results in less erosion, less disruption to other plants, less mud, etc. Instead of pulling most stumps I prefer to cut them close, then chop the heck out of the remainder (with the tool of your choice) until it's all splintered up, then cover it with several inches of hot compost and a thick layer of wet duff. Much less work and the stub of a stump slowly rots out all by itself while you do other things!

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