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Thread: Not a New story...

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    Default Not a New story...

    Hello all, I am a medically retired Iraq war vet from the lower 48 and have decided to make my childhood dreams come true(living in AK)....also I want to be a pilot... Now since the Army has/will been nice enough to pay my way through the UAA Aviation tech program Prof Pilot program I will look to make a living by flying, I don't need or expect the money right out the gate(wife would be primary bread winner for awhile) nor do I have illusions of being rich, and I have no interest in working for the majors. I have 0 Zero hrs behind the stick and will start flying in Anchorage. I am not afraid of hard work and would rather embrace it. My query would be how easy or hard would be to get hours after school is done do people hire college pilots fresh out the gate or would I have to join the Elendorf (spelling) Areo club and pay my way? Also as time goes by I look forward to buying some of you guys a beer and plundering all your useful information on flying and life in general.

    Thanks to all that reply and Fly/Ride safe.

    Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by AimSmallMissSmall View Post
    Hello all, I am a medically retired Iraq war vet from the lower 48 and have decided to make my childhood dreams come true(living in AK)....also I want to be a pilot... Now since the Army has/will been nice enough to pay my way through the UAA Aviation tech program Prof Pilot program I will look to make a living by flying, I don't need or expect the money right out the gate(wife would be primary bread winner for awhile) nor do I have illusions of being rich, and I have no interest in working for the majors. I have 0 Zero hrs behind the stick and will start flying in Anchorage. I am not afraid of hard work and would rather embrace it. My query would be how easy or hard would be to get hours after school is done do people hire college pilots fresh out the gate or would I have to join the Elendorf (spelling) Areo club and pay my way? Also as time goes by I look forward to buying some of you guys a beer and plundering all your useful information on flying and life in general.

    Thanks to all that reply and Fly/Ride safe.

    Paul
    Talk to the Civil Air Patrol (Arcturus Squadron) based at Elmendorf. Good bunch of guys and I'm sure they'd get you going in the 172, even if only as an observer at first.

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    Hey Paul,

    The FAA minimum pilot experience requirements to fly as PIC (pilot-in-command) under FARs Part135 is 500 hours. 100 hours of that has to be cross country time, and of that 100 hours, 25 hours has to be night cross country. Cross country flight includes a point of landing that is at least a straight-line distance of more than 50 nautical miles from the original point of departure; and that involves the use of dead reckoning, pilotage, electronic navigation aids, radio aids, or other navigation systems to navigate to the landing point.

    Most Alaska operators require a minimum of 1000 hours or more. There are a few who will hire at less than that, but none for PIC positions without at least the legal minimum of 500 hours. Most operators also like to see some Alaska time or equivalent and some time in type. This is probably an insurance requirement.There are no operators that I know of who can legally accept a low-time volunteer pilot wanting to build hours nor are there any who have no-cost intern programs.


    The absolute best way to build time is by getting your CFI-I and giving flight instruction to build time. By acquiring all your certifications, (private, commercial, instrument, and instrument flight instructor) in Alaska, you would log a bunch of Alaska time and also get to know people in the aviation community who might be able to steer you toward your goal. This is especially true of Anchorage which has the biggest aviation community in the state.

    Elmendorf flying club would probably be the least expensive for your initial training, but you might want to get a float rating at some point also. The following FAA manual might have some useful information for you: http://www.faa.gov/library/manuals/a...h-8083-27a.pdf
    Last edited by Monguse; 08-08-2011 at 11:58. Reason: Re-wording

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    Thanks for the Info, If I completed the whole UAA process I would come out of it with a CFI-I and an elected "other" rating i.e. multi engine or float I was just trying to see If there was a process of working your hours up. I didnt think of the CAP I will look into that and find what exactly that is for sure. I am prepared to be an instructor to get my hours up and this seems like one of the safer ways than just jumping in a plane and spotting for fish with no xp. As soon as I get up there I will start networking and as I have read hanging out at the airport and talking is free. . Again thanks for the info.

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    Paul, one quick reality check. With your medical retirement, make sure before you spend any money on career aspirations in aviation that none of the factors that required your early departure from active duty will disqualify you from getting a Class II medical. . . . the FAA is not very flexible on anything dealing with medicals . . .

    Good luck with your transition . . .

    John

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    There is a flight surgeon on FT Polk I have been talking to and cross my fingers he says nothing should present a problem. Thank you for the thought. So far thing Im not looking forward to is that it will take 4 years for me to get my ratings if Uncle Sam is paying. So all said and done I will be in Anchorage for the fall semester in 2012. Outta the Army and still gotta play the hurry up and wait game... I am so ready to be done with HOT weather god willing no more deserts or Louisiana swamps for this guy! Thanks again

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    Paul,
    Regarding the medical I would get a first class just to make sure you can. Some operators want PIC's and SIC's to have First Class medical because then they can tell whom ever they work for "all" their pilots have a First class medical'.

    Also if you want to build time then BUY a small plane and fly it every chance you get. A Cessna 150, Pacer, Champ, Chief, J3, J5 etc ... any of these aircraft would inexpensive to buy (20K or so) and to operate allowing you to build time on your schedule. If you get a friend to fly with you, then you can split the gas (5-8 GPH/2) making it even more economical. You will also see lots of Alaska, build AK time which most operators want. Make sure you get skis because it opens up a lot of back country for half of the year.

    Just my nickel,
    Drew
    Normal people believe that if something ain't broke, don't fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet.

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    The following is a quote from another forum:

    "I caution those who routinely apply for a second or even first class medical certificate when they don't require it. A friend of mine would always apply for a first class medical certificate although he only required a third class. He was a Rambo type who prided himself on his physical conditioning and relished a tofu and fruit diet. Once we went to the aviation medical examiner together for our physicals. He went for his traditional first class, and I opted for my normal third class, feeling lucky to get it. The AME discovered that my friend had a minor eye problem, and he was disqualified for a first class medical certificate. When you have a disqualifying condition, you are not just bumped down to the next lower class; you walk out of the doctor's office with no medical certificate at all. That day I got my third class, but my friend had no medical at all and had to reapply. The lesson learned here is not to apply for a class of certificate higher than you need."

    http://www.aopa.org/asf/publications...m?article=4674

    I have seen other on-line writings that caution pilots not to apply for a higher level of medical certificate than they are required to have.

    As for buying and flying your own airplane to build time, your GI bill isn't going to cover that expense. In my humble opinion, you're going to learn a whole lot more and get a broader range of experience by flying a variety of different aircraft over the time span of your training through CFI-I than you would by by building most of your time in in just one. Also building time by giving flight instruction is a great way to learn a whole bunch more. After the completion of your GI bill training would (again in my opinion) be the better time to acquire your own plane.

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    You guys have been nothing but helpful, and I greatly appreciate it. I do worry about the medical thing if I get rejected for a 1st class in Louisiana can i just wait till I get to AK and try for a 2nd class or am I out of the game for good? I will use the GI Bill to its fullest and as I was unaware that an air frame could be attained at such low cost I will talk to the other half and friend of mine in the same boat with the GI Bill about that. Quick question would I have to get a SKI rating? or is it the same sequence? Im sure I dont have to tell you guys about the flying bug but I got it bad right now and next year cant come fast enough for me!

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    Quote Originally Posted by AimSmallMissSmall View Post
    You guys have been nothing but helpful, and I greatly appreciate it. I do worry about the medical thing if I get rejected for a 1st class in Louisiana can i just wait till I get to AK and try for a 2nd class or am I out of the game for good? I will use the GI Bill to its fullest and as I was unaware that an air frame could be attained at such low cost I will talk to the other half and friend of mine in the same boat with the GI Bill about that. Quick question would I have to get a SKI rating? or is it the same sequence? Im sure I dont have to tell you guys about the flying bug but I got it bad right now and next year cant come fast enough for me!
    Paul, once you get rejected for a Class 1 Medical, you're disqualified for all (meaning you have to reapply and hope to find a medical examiner who'll pass you with the lower Class physical), which makes it wise to seek the class you need.

    There is no ski rating/endorsement per se, but training is offered in state and i wouldn't try to fly a plane on skis without seeking training from any number of qualified sources here in state.

    Don't be afraid to start flying, just keep on doing what you're already doing - seek knowledge from those who've already made most of the mistakes. . . .

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    A.S.M.S.... email me @ kmox2002@yahoo.com please I have a contact for you..

    If you cant stand behind the troops in Iraq.. Feel free to stand in front of them.

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    Paul, once you get rejected for a Class 1 Medical, you're disqualified for all (meaning you have to reapply and hope to find a medical examiner who'll pass you with the lower Class physical), which makes it wise to seek the class you need.
    There is no ski rating/endorsement per se, but training is offered in state and i wouldn't try to fly a plane on skis without seeking training from any number of qualified sources here in state.

    Thats Kind of scary about the med thing god forbid you have a bad BP day or something. Im sure as I go along I will make some friends that can point me in the right direction as far as skis and floats. My friend just got to anchorage yesterday and said it was more scenic than Afghanistan (the view is under rated) and no one was trying kill him so theirs that in the pros box. On a side note my other half(the bread winner) Is an elementary school teacher and will be looking for work if anyone knows any one with a contact or info on the schools that would be a tremendous help. Im sure shes using her resources im just trying to push her over the fence on moving.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AimSmallMissSmall View Post
    My friend just got to anchorage yesterday and said it was more scenic than Afghanistan (the view is under rated) and no one was trying kill him so theirs that in the pros box.
    He hasn't driven the New Seward Highway on a Friday afternoon yet!!
    Normal people believe that if something ain't broke, don't fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Toddler View Post
    He hasn't driven the New Seward Highway on a Friday afternoon yet!!
    Haha it cant be that bad right? I grew up in St Louis so Im pretty used to idiots on the freeway lol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AimSmallMissSmall View Post
    Haha it cant be that bad right? I grew up in St Louis so Im pretty used to idiots on the freeway lol.
    Down there the idiots don't cross into your lane head on while pulling a boat/rv...

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    Paul

    There's some confusion on the medical. Most of the time if your rejected for a specific medical condition the Flight Surgeon will recommend remediation. The doctor will usually set you up for treatment and re-examine you when he thinks your ready. Unless you have an unusual or terminal condition most medical rejections can be corrected through treatment.

    Forty 0ne years ago I was rejected for high blood pressure(white coat syndrom). The doctor had me come back and see his nurse about 5 times over two weeks. As soon as I hit within the peramiters I was passed and on my way.

    Good luck. You've chosen a passion that will never let you down for adventure, stories and the chance to meet some really great people from all over the world. I did 30 years all over Alaska. I don't regret one single hour of flying.

    Thom

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    Do not get a Class I medical, Second Class is enough a this point. Out side of being a little tighter on Eye Sight and have to take and EKG, the rest of the physical pretty much the same. As for the rest of it, its going to take you a bit of time and a lot of effort. I would suggest going the flight instructor route, because it will do a couple of things for you, you will really learn how to fly by teaching people to fly. And you will build up flight time fairly quickly. At this time there is a lack of jobs due to the poor economy. This will not last forever. And the Job situation will be better by the time you have 1500 to 2000 hour in the logbook. Expect the first two or three jobs to pay rather poorly. I just applied for a job flying a Beech 99 and starting pay is 33K a year, I only been flying for almost 38 years now. But that how it goes, the economy is not good and there are lots of pilots on the streets Good luck to you. Its a long hard road you are about to take, and for the most part thankless yet you get to live were you want and in Alaska, its worth the effort.

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    thom2249, Thank you for clearing that up sir.

    BH206L3 "I would suggest going the flight instructor route, because it will do a couple of things for you, you will really learn how to fly by teaching people to fly. And you will build up flight time fairly quickly. At this time there is a lack of jobs due to the poor economy. This will not last forever."

    I had hoped that once I got my CFI the school (UAA) would hire me to teach the under classmen and as that will be about 3 years from now I also hope that the economy will be on its way back up and I can further accel my career. I am prepared/preparing to be broke for along while but with my ol' lady's income and my retirement we should be able to feed ourselves and or four legged children. As for the long hard and thankless road I and most other vets have been walking/running on it for along time. Altho I will say that this generation has been far more suportive of thier vets and Im thankful of the hard road paved by my fellow brothers in arms. Feel free to post any and all advice as I love to read and learn from those who have been there and done that.

    Thanks agian all.

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