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Thread: Want a bird hunting partner

  1. #1
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    Default Want a bird hunting partner

    I work at a nonprofit in Anchorage and all my coworkers are women, none of them hunters. I've lived in Alaska since 1994 and my wife and I have been avid fishing bums. Unfortunately my wife has no desire hunt so I have not gone in this great state. Last year, I decided I really want to pick up bird hunting again, I used to hunt grouse and pheasant in Washington. I bought a cheap shotgun and took off into the woods with little success but some good time. This year, I'd like get to know some fellow birders and possibly do some trips together. I'm a middle-age guy in good shape and still able to pull my own weight. Please drop me a line if interested.

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    Mr. Lambert,

    Sorry no one has responded to your friendly request. I'm a long way from Anchorage. I live in Alaska (Fairbanks)and can't help you. I'm sure someone will come along and help you out, but if they don't just get out into the woods with gun in hand and let the prey teach you their lessons. You should also do your homework in terms of reading. You might check out the ADF&G wildlife notebook series?

    Best of luck on your adventure!

    jim

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    Thank you Jim,

    I figured it was a long shot but that's okay. I did purchase and read your book and have read most of the ADF&G material but nothing beats being out in the woods trying to put that newfound knowledge to work. I will be joining Grouse Ridge in Palmer and hopefully meet some like-minded folks.

    Thanks again,

    Len

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    Len,

    You're going to have a great adventure! Enjoy every bit of it. Become, and remain the student and you'll enjoy the finest upland hunting in the country. Warning: Upland hunting is addictive and may cause you to dream of autumn days afield with a great gun in hand at the strangest of times...like sitting at a traffic light during rush hour and after the light has turned green. And then there are the bird dogs, the most wonderful creatures and the best hunting pal you'll ever have.

    Jim

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    Hi Len,, The best hunting buddy you can find is a good bird dog, and if you let em they will teach you more about bird hunting than you can learn anywhere else(although Jim comes in a close second
    I been hunting upland game for going on 40 years now, hunted with lots of different folks but the best days i ever spent afield was just me and my ol hound's,, gotta admit my dogs have taught me plenty about myself and just life in general also as well as most everything i have learned about upland hunting.
    I suggest you read through a bunch of Jim's old posts and several other folks on here, get yourself a fine hunting dog and you will be good to go,, Good luck to ya..

    On a side note,, well, Jim finally made a comment that is just plain wrong,, heck anybody that knows anything bout bird huntin' knows Idaho has the best bird huntin' in the country, we just need some of them ptarmigan to make it that much better.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by LenLambert View Post
    I work at a nonprofit in Anchorage and all my coworkers are women, none of them hunters. I've lived in Alaska since 1994 and my wife and I have been avid fishing bums. Unfortunately my wife has no desire hunt so I have not gone in this great state. Last year, I decided I really want to pick up bird hunting again, I used to hunt grouse and pheasant in Washington. I bought a cheap shotgun and took off into the woods with little success but some good time. This year, I'd like get to know some fellow birders and possibly do some trips together. I'm a middle-age guy in good shape and still able to pull my own weight. Please drop me a line if interested.
    Len I do a lot of Ptarmigan hunting in winter, if you want maybe we can get together for a hunt. Just let me know if you are intrested. I'm young and in shape and like to hike a bunch.

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    Slimm,

    You may be right about Idaho. I guess I'll have to slip on down there and see for myself!

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    Jim, it would be an honor to burn some boot leather and powder with you.
    From all the signs I'm seeing this year is shaping up to be nothing short of spectacular.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slimm View Post
    I been hunting upland game for going on 40 years now, hunted with lots of different folks but the best days i ever spent afield was just me and my ol hound's
    Well said slimm!

    This got me thinking...it seems to me that the more serious you take your upland hunting, the more likely you are to do it alone or just with your dog. The only exception to this, I guess, are the pheasant hunting hordes.

    I don't mind taking someone from time to time, but my preference is for solitude. I guess that way, I can selfishly approach a covert in a direction, speed or particular location that works for me rather than worrying about what my partner plans to do. I never have to make excuses for my dog (when my training fails him). And, I don't have to make excuses for how out of shape I am, or worry about my partner's physical ability either.

    Having made myself out to be a selfish introvert, I have to say I will (like every year) introduce new people to my sport of choice. I revel in seeing the addiction take hold. The beauty of it is that the addiction will usually take hold without so much as ruffling a feather of our prey. It typically takes nothing more than a close flush from King Ruffie, who will quickly defy any and all attempts of the neophyte to bring him to hand. The flush and (more often than not) wild shots will leave the newly possessed hunter with pulses pounding and near hyperventilation...yep, he's hooked.


    Tyler

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    Hello Russ,

    Thank you for your offer and I look forward to pursuing ptarmigan. I'm not sure I've even seen ptarmigan so it'd be a priviledge just to be in their locale. How about if we meet up for beverage and talk it over. You can e-mail me at cptnwightwen@yahoo.com. Thanks again for your offer and your willingness to show an old newby your ropes.

    Len

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    I appreciate all the input this thread is getting. It exhibits the personal character that is present in many of the students of bird hunting I've known and hope to get to know in the future. Thank you very much.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LenLambert View Post
    I appreciate all the input this thread is getting. It exhibits the personal character that is present in many of the students of bird hunting I've known and hope to get to know in the future. Thank you very much.
    I will be ptarmigan/caribou disposed from soon till the 3rd of September. After that we could do some hunting of a spot or two I know and some I'd like to, during the week or the weekend. Let me know. My dog won't be going. She is too little and we are working on basics... PM me after September.

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    LenLambert - Congratulations on pursuing bird hunting in AK. I have not yet bird hunted here but I am getting into busting some clay pigeons at Rabbit Creek to dust the cobwebs off (the last pheasant fell about 20 yrs ago!) if you're interested in meeting out there. My son is my motivation to finally get out and get reacquainted with hunting after a long hiatus. He and I will be going on our first father/son bird hunt after our MT trip.

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    Woodsman, sounds like a winner, I'll PM after you get back. Thanks for the offer.

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    377PFA, I definitely know where you're coming from. My last bird was probably 25 years ago. I went to Rabbit Creek last year and quickly realized that I am darn poor at sporting clays. Probably darn poor at shooting guns at any moving target which means I need the practice. I'd love to meet with you and see if I can run through a few boxes. I will be taking a couple lessons out at Grouse Ridge if you're interested.

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    LenLambert - Sounds good. Just send me a PM when you get a chance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TMCKEE View Post
    Well said slimm!

    This got me thinking...it seems to me that the more serious you take your upland hunting, the more likely you are to do it alone or just with your dog. The only exception to this, I guess, are the pheasant hunting hordes.

    I don't mind taking someone from time to time, but my preference is for solitude. I guess that way, I can selfishly approach a covert in a direction, speed or particular location that works for me rather than worrying about what my partner plans to do. I never have to make excuses for my dog (when my training fails him). And, I don't have to make excuses for how out of shape I am, or worry about my partner's physical ability either.

    Having made myself out to be a selfish introvert, I have to say I will (like every year) introduce new people to my sport of choice. I revel in seeing the addiction take hold. The beauty of it is that the addiction will usually take hold without so much as ruffling a feather of our prey. It typically takes nothing more than a close flush from King Ruffie, who will quickly defy any and all attempts of the neophyte to bring him to hand. The flush and (more often than not) wild shots will leave the newly possessed hunter with pulses pounding and near hyperventilation...yep, he's hooked.


    Tyler
    Right back at ya TMCKEE,, every single word you wrote hits home,, Have a great season, from one Tyler to another..
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