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Thread: Blanching and freezing veggies

  1. #1
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Default Blanching and freezing veggies

    I don't know if this post fits under the gardening forum or not, but here goes. I grew way too much broch and cauli this year, so decided to just blanch (par boil) it, then freezing it. I went ahead last week and picked it all, boiled it for about 2 minutes, let it dry a little (patted it with towel and air dried for a few minutes), then put it in ziplocks, sucked as much air out as possible and put it in the freezer. I haven't tried it yet as I've been gone this last week, and was just wondering if I did it right. Has anyone done this with there veggies, and did I do it right, or did I just ruin a bunch of good broch/cauli?

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    probably not ruined, but it might be pretty soft when you thaw it. the essential step you missed in the blanching process is plunging the food into ice water after the dip in the boiling water. this stops the cooking process and makes the veggies stay 'fresher', i.e. crisper and greener. your food will be fine.

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    I do like d-steev says. My old Ball blue book says for brocc, 3 minutes in boiling water. then 3 min in ice water.
    Bring a big pot of water to boiling, put the brocc in for 3 min (the water may not be boiling after you add the brocc, but you blanched it in 3 minutes) then quickly into ice cold water.
    Done it that way for many years, works great. Like you, I dry it off a bit, bag it & suck the air out of the bags best I can.
    Brocc, cauliflower, carrots, beets, beens etc. from the garden.

    Take it out when needed & steam it, great eats,
    add to stew, pot roasts, etc. Health food & $$ in the freezer.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Here's a question... the veggies you get at the grocery store freezer section are just loosely sealed in a bag (e.g. peas, corn, etc). Does anyone try vacuum packing their veggies prior to freezing and does it make any difference?
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Vacuum crushes the food. Unless you can blast freeze first and package second. But if you can blast freeze the vacuum really isn't very important.

    I blanch for one minute, ice bath, freezer Ziplock, and suck the air out gently. Did broccoli and lots of greens last night.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    My wife's "Better Homes & Gardens" cookbook (1989) says to Blache (Broccoli) in boiling water for 3 minutes, or Steam for 5 mins Cool Quickly, Package, leaving no (little) head space... Says about the same thing for Cauliflower... and Turnips...
    (I enjoy turnips chunks in my Moose Stew)

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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Thanks guy's. It looks like I missed the ice water bath part, oh well, I'll get it right next year. I guess they'll be a bit more mushy than we like, but we're going to eat them anyway.

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    Member akiceman25's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Here's a question... the veggies you get at the grocery store freezer section are just loosely sealed in a bag (e.g. peas, corn, etc).
    To achieve this after blanching you can place the individual veggies pieces, flowerets on broccilli or cauliflower, seperated on a cookie sheet and freeze. Then loosely pack in ziplocs after frozen. Much easier to grab only what is needed when its time to consume.

    -akiceman25

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    After 'blanching' we always vaccuum seal our veggies. We have been it that way for years and works good. Our veggies last for a year or better put up this way.

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    I blanched 2 minutes, ice bath, ate the broc at thanksgiving and tasted about the exact same as fresh picked/steamed. This year i was worried about the cauliflower making a curd, but its going ganbusters now, and i'll be putting up some for the winter.

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