Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Win M-70 - Freefloat the barrel?

  1. #1
    Member Mort's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Niceville, FL
    Posts
    459

    Question Win M-70 - Freefloat the barrel?

    Didn't know if I should post this in "Gunsmithing."

    I have a Win M-70 in 300 Wby. When I bought it, it had the synthetic stock. I replaced it with a laminate wood stock, and this stock has a pressure point up near the front sling swivel, about 1" long. It doesn't seem to be as accurate as it was with the syn stock, which I subsequently sold. I don't know if the barrel was free-floating in the syn stock.

    In general, do these rifles do better with a pressure point up front, or totally free-floated? Or, is it really just specific to each individual rifle?

    Chris

  2. #2
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,022

    Default

    Each rifle is different, the barrel contour is a major consideration as well. Personaly I would remove the material up front and relieve that pressure point, especialy if you think the prior stock did have that.

    Incidently, all of my rifles are fully free-floated and glass bedded and shoot sub-moa, I have never had a rifle that shot well with forend pressure, however, I do know a few people who own rifles which shoot best with forend pressure.

  3. #3
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,482

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mort View Post
    In general, do these rifles do better with a pressure point up front, or totally free-floated? Or, is it really just specific to each individual rifle?

    Chris
    Certainly each rifle can be individualistic, but I bed the action and free float the barrel as a first step on every bolt action rifle own. If it does not perform sufficiently free floated then I consider placing some forend pressure on the barrel, but most likely will rebarrel or sell that rifle. Many years ago I read an article by Gale McMillan (founder of McMillan rifle stocks) where he expects upward of 90% of rifles to shoot best free floated and he has built and bedded more than his share of rifles. Taking his advice, free floating is the best for my purposes and for high quality barrels it seems the best method of bedding period. However, factory barrels are often of mediocre quality and pressure bedding can sometimes help them. If your rifle were mine I'd bed the action and free float the barrel. That way you'd be starting with a known quantity and you'll be able to tune your rifle until you get satisfactory results.

    I'll add that if you free float the stock, do not be bashful with removing material. Some like to float them with .008-.010 clearance (a folded dollar bill), but I'll double that (a folded index card), oftentimes more, for my rifles. That way there is no possibility that the stock can contact the barrel with a tight sling or otherwise putting the forearm in a bind. YMMV.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  4. #4
    Member Mort's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Niceville, FL
    Posts
    459

    Default

    Thanks for the inputs, and I welcome more. That said, I just got back from the range, after ginning up a new load and tightening all screws. Got 5 shots in well under an inch, so I'll run with that to see if I can repeat. However, I will definitely be floating a couple other barrels that are proving a bit more problematic.

    Chris

  5. #5
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    I'll add that if you free float the stock, do not be bashful with removing material. Some like to float them with .008-.010 clearance (a folded dollar bill), but I'll double that (a folded index card), oftentimes more, for my rifles. That way there is no possibility that the stock can contact the barrel with a tight sling or otherwise putting the forearm in a bind. YMMV.
    A third vote for free float and I agree with the above also. I like to use a nice heavy business card for about .025-.028Ē myself because I wrap so tight in the sling that Iím just resting my trigger hand on the stock . . . my fore hand alone is holding the gun. I have also gone too far and got trash in there out in the field so keep that in mind.

    Once itís free if it doesnít shoot you can play with pressure points using paper shims to see if it wants pressure, how much, and where.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  6. #6
    Member The Kid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    1,089

    Default

    I like to full length bed a problem barrel first and then go shoot it. If it doesn't get better or gets worse then it's time to free float. You can do it either way but I find it easier to make a professional looking job of it if I scrape the bbl Chanel out rather than trying to patch in glass in the bbl chanel without getting overruns. In my experience most factory lightweight barrels like Rem TIs and Win FWs shoot very well with the entire Chanel supported.

  7. #7

    Default

    Like others have said, every barrel is different. It does seem as though the rifles I have had with thin light weight barrels usually did better with a full bedded channel or pressure up by the fore end tip. The problem is a thin barrel in a wooden stock can be effected if the stock moves and puts pressure on the barrel. On the Mod. 70 "Classic Stainless" Featherweight 30-06 I gave my daughter I free floated the barrel due to the thin fore end on the good looking wooden stock. The barrel channel and recoil lug and rear tang area were all done at once. I put a couple of layers of heavy tape on the barrel and it is now free floated about an inch forward of where the barrel screws into the action. It will shoot 3 shot groups into a little over an inch with 180 grain Barnes X bullets. Years ago I lucked out and got a very good shooting barrel on a Mod. 70 "Classic Stainless" .338 Win. Mag. I sent it to Bansner's Rifles and they put the synthetic stock on it. The barrel is free floated for the first 2 inches and the rifle will shoot 5 shot groups into an inch with the original 250 grain Barnes X bullets. I have a Pre-64 Mod. 70 .375 H&H with a cut down factory 21" barrel on a McMillan stock. The barrel channel is fully bedded and the rifle also shoots very well. I think the main thing on a big game rifle is to set your rifle up so that it is consistent and don't worry about whether it shoots 1" or 1.25" 3 shot groups from the bench at a 100 yards.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •