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Thread: Any special tools or tricks when caping a sheep...

  1. #1
    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
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    Default Any special tools or tricks when caping a sheep...

    I've watch some videos on caping, fleshing, and turning eyes, lips, and ears. I've caped deer before but never took the hide off of the skull. Never done a sheep before either.Just wondering if any of you have any special tools or tricks when working the hide off around the horn bases.

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    Member HuntNBgame's Avatar
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    I watched my guide he used a small pearing knife (the cheap ones with about a 2in blade, plastic handle) ,heavey enough blade to get tight to the skull and still bend.

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    Sponsor Hoytguy's Avatar
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    On a sheep hunt where weight will be an issue, get a scalpel handle and a half dozen blades, Not the exacto type, I would suggest #21 or #22 blades. Another great tool is a small flat tip screw driver, both are compact and light.. screwdriver works good to pry the skin up off the skull from in between the horns after the Y has been cut... once you work your way around the sides and get the ear canals cut at the skull (leaving plenty of the ear base, etc..), you can work the hide around the base.. then focusing on the eyes next.. Lots of tight spots, Ears, eyes and the Y flap all are pretty close and easy to mess up.

    I've loaned out scalpel blades and a handle and gave quick skinning classes, do's and dont's to a couple guys heading to kodiak for brown bears last fall and this past spring.

    Blood is another issue with sheep.. also shot placement on the animal and its location.. A sheep that falls and rolls 2K feet down the mountain will not look as nice as one with minimal damage.

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    The tear ducts are a tricky part, really scrape the bone.

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    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
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    Thanks...I have a havalon with both the rounded and scalpel blades, should do the trick. I've never turned ears before so that will be tricky.

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    Sponsor Hoytguy's Avatar
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    If you need help or any pointers shoot me a PM, I can give you directions, stop by and Ill school you up on it.. the nose needs to be split and the nostrils turned, lips and eyes split also.. 5lbs of salt will suffice for a sheep cape, if you plan of lifesize then you will need more salt. All things to consider before going to the field, Im sure you thought of all this.. some dont, they shoot a animal and are like. *** do I do now.. Sheep capes arent cheap to replace..

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    My taxidermist carrys a box knife with a few extra blades. It's light and cheap he makes pretty quick work skinning the head and turning everything never grabs another knife.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

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    Member Lone Wolf1's Avatar
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    Talk to/visit your taxidermist BEFORE you go. For many, a sheep is a once-in-a-lifetime trophy that needs special care in the field. Good luck, and have a safe hunt!

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