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Thread: Packing Moose

  1. #1
    Member bigswede358's Avatar
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    Default Packing Moose

    I have never killed a moose before, especially a big Alaskan specimen. I've heard they dwarf the shiras we have hear in Idaho. How many trips of packing meat on your back does it usually take to get one of these critters out of the woods

  2. #2
    Mark
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    Eight trips for me, includingone for head/antlers.

  3. #3
    Member bigswede358's Avatar
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    Default UHH my back

    I should start doing some back exercises! How big of loads were on your pack for the eight trips?

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    Default Another tact

    If you've got flatish ground you can use a kiddie sled shined up with pledge....I packed mine last year using one and never had to put a single quarter on my frame....definitely easier on you at the end of the day.

    They pack flat in a boat and even come in camo

    I'm not a big guy, so anything I can do to save energy, I'm for it. Even if it means sledding just half or most of the drag.

  5. #5
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Ditto

    Eight for me as well. Eight big oh my god I'm never going to do this again loads.
    Is it hunting season yet. 7 bags O meat plus the head. Nine if I would have caped it. Just think of it as a horse with Antlers. The quaters are the easy part, it's the 100 lb bags of Jello AKA Trimmings that really suck. They try to fall out every step.

    Steve


  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigswede358 View Post
    ....How big of loads were on your pack for the eight trips?
    The heaviest loads are the rear hams. I'd say they weigh up to 150 lbs each, with the bone in it.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Weights

    On Mine the rear qtrs were 125 lbs, front 95 lbs, 2 bags of trimmings about a 100 each. the head and antlers came in around 80 or so. You must cut off all edible meat. I mean it must look like a vulture has been on it. Plus take pictures of the carcase. Just in case a brown shirt ask.


    Steve

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    About the same # of trip for us also. Four (4) for each quarter, one (1) for both racks of ribs/briskett & tenderlions, one (1) for neck & misc loose trimmings, another (1) for the cape and finally (1) the antlers, 8 backpack loads generally.
    I have seen it done in 5 trips, other times I have seen it take 9-10 trips...a lot depends on location, size, distance, strenght & determination of the folks carrying the backs.

    Over the years I have always found it interesting that your choice of hunting buddies really comes into play once a Moose has been harvested. In other words, its common for somone to shows signs of some ailment; hurt ankle, bad back, twisted knee, tired, or whatever. Its nice to have a partner you can really count on when they're work to be done.
    Sometimes there is nearby timber to the kill-site. We carry tarps, quality game bags, and everything else we need for butchering when were hunting. As soon as the Moose is harvested we totally butcher it, and then hang the game bags in a nearby tree, covered with a tarp. Once the meat is properly cared for, hanging, and staying cool & dry, its not a lot different than hanging on your meat pole back ay camp. This takes some presure off, knowing that if it takes you two-three days for all of the packing the meat will be properly cared for. Of course there is always a chance of some critter getting into it, before leaving the kill-site everyone should act like a Wolverine and relieve themselves before departing.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default One other point.

    Forgot to mention the 3 to 4 hours bent over butchering it up. Bad enough, now add knee deep freezing water, or mud. My buddy asked, ( What do we do if I kill one 2 miles from the river?) I said (easy I don't go looking for one 2 miles from the river, problem solved!) The work starts when you pull the trigger, and depending on the type hunt, can continue for days. After 8 days, I almost wish I had never saw that moose. On a float hunt you have to handle the meat quite a bit. Loading and unloading, hauling it up and down steep river banks. I think you get the picture. Byrons right about knowing who you friends are when it comes to this type of work. Back breaking, now I know why rich guys hire Sherpas. Now of course I would do it all over again. LOL
    Steve

  10. #10
    New member fishingis4play's Avatar
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    Wink Shoot a smaller Moose

    Shoot a spike or a fork and you can pack it out in 4 trips (1 rear quater a trip= 2, both front quaters=3 and trimmings, ribs, head=4) and they melt in your mouth Haven't had the pleasure of a 60 incher myself but have packed plenty of moose for friends. We use the pack frame (1 quarter) and sled method (another quarter and trimmings) if there is a big moose down and can cut the trips down if were limited on time. Just a lot harder that way but it can be done. We are all big 6'2" 245lbs so were all kinda like pack horses Good Luck

  11. #11
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Default

    Ussually takes me 8-10 but I pack lighter than most folk because of my back whenever possible I'll use a wheeled drag skid and before my St Barnard's hips went out she did most of the packin' 200lbs. at a time. Maybe it's time to think about a new pup?

    Stid a knowing nodd and LOL

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    Member KRS's Avatar
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    We were fortunate to be able to wrangle the pickup to where dad downed his. Used a com-a-long and wrenched it up there.... with the tailgate down.

    Got home and pulled the moose out onto the skinning block and tackle... and that sucker bent the tailgate into an easy "U" shape.... it seemed like a good idea at the time!

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    New member mtcop71's Avatar
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    Default

    6 trips, for me, each 1/4, trimming's and finally the antlers.. the butchering takes a while, make sure you have a god saw for the skull cap!

  14. #14

    Default How many Trips?

    Quote Originally Posted by bigswede358 View Post
    I have never killed a moose before, especially a big Alaskan specimen. I've heard they dwarf the shiras we have hear in Idaho. How many trips of packing meat on your back does it usually take to get one of these critters out of the woods


    1 trip is all it takes. The Honda Foreman can carry way more weight than I can, stabilizes the weight well, holds up great throughtout the entire pack out, doesn't need rests or water breaks, and has never fallen apart. Oh , the chainsaw and meat trailer help out a little too. Seriously I have never packed a moose out and never plan on it either. Have passed up my share that I couldn't get a wheeler near and will do so again. Just aint no fun in packin moose, simply put.

  15. #15
    Member Alasken's Avatar
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    stid2677, seeing that you cut the meat off the rib bones makes me cringe. Not saying anything wrong with how you do it, but I love ribs in camp over a fire all day, almost as good as the tenderloins.
    mtcop71, six trips? You da man!
    I've never packed a moose more than 3/4 mile. The best one I had was when my wife shot a fork horn bull that ended up in the water. She had to hold the boat still while I threw the meat into it. No packing. Gotta love that. And it was the first day of the hunt, we were back at camp eating moose meat at 10:00 am. Sweet!
    Art is making something out of nothing and selling it.
    - Frank Zappa

  16. #16
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Ribs

    Will have to try that next time. This was my first and it was a float hunt with a fly out. Heck, I had to take the lint out of my pockets so we could take off. LOL I love BBQ ribs, what do you use to cut the rib bones?

    Steve

  17. #17
    Member Alasken's Avatar
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    10-4 on the fly out and the weight. I've used a hand saw, but my favorite tool to cut the ribs is a 18 volt dewalt sawzall. I have some pics somewhere of ribs roasting over an open fire. I'll find 'em and post 'em.
    Art is making something out of nothing and selling it.
    - Frank Zappa

  18. #18

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    A well sharpened Gerber plastic handle hatchet does wonders on prepping the ribs for the campfire too. Whole rack comes off easy.

  19. #19

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    I've packed out 6 moose and I've averaged 7-8 trips. The heaviest pack was 160 pounds. Any who, it's a lot of work.

  20. #20

    Default just my thoughts

    When I worked for George palmer---Alaska trophy hunts--the guide never once looked at me and asked if it was to far to pack--they just shot and I was the mule--I had one pack that was close to camp, about 3/4 of a mile and it was all uphill--luckily I had a great trail--guide said that he had never seen anyone not take a break with all that meat on their back--I told him that was due to the fact that if I stopped I probably wouldn't want to get back up We had 2 hunters come in camp, swear up and down that they are going to help pack their bulls, they both shoot bulls a day apart and a couple miles from camp--they helped pack--part of a load and not even the whole way back to camp. So 2 years ago when I shot my bull 1.5 miles from camp I thought--no big deal--I tried moving him in 7 trips--now I am 40--and my body let me know it--it took 4 days, 10 hours a day, I took plenty of breaks--this pack was much tougher than when I worked for george--no trails, tundra/bogs and hills, but in the end it was worth it, trophy of a lifetime and I did it by myself,

    The biggest advice I would give is get a good pack--don't go cheap, I used a military pack for the whole moose--with 2 bungy chords for the quarters--I don't recommend this pack, but it was what I could afford. If you have time and you aren't worried about critters getting your meat, then why kill yourself?? you don't have a choice with the quarteres, not to mention 150lbs on your back and you turn your ankle, I hunted/worked by myself, there was a family camping in the same area as me, but I knew everystep had to be thought out.

    Dream big

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