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Thread: Do Electric Bear Fences really work?

  1. #1

    Default Do Electric Bear Fences really work?

    I am planning on using electric fences to protect my game during my hunt due to the fact where i am going there are no trees. Do these fences really work?

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    I will be using one for the first time, we set it up in the yard the other day and i needed to touch it to see how strong it was .....and yes it shocked pretty good. A bear moves about with its nose, and when a bear puts its nose on it it, it will get a pretty good jolt, those two D batteries can really send it.

  3. #3

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    Several stories in the archives of guys saying the bear fence worked for them on Kodiak or on the Pen...

  4. #4

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    Yes they do work. I have been on three fly-out hunts where electric fences were used. There were LOTS of bears around and our meat/camp inside the fence was never bothered.

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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Pretty good discussion about electric fences here:

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ost-or-all-bs.
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    If your setting one up, make sure you have a good ground, thats why its worth testing by touching it. .........serious thought though, careful not to urinate on it in the middle of the night when you get out of the tent.....not sure what it would feel like.

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    Last year we camped on a sand bar and set up a bear fence around the meat. Got up one morning to find a set of bear tracks where a bear had walked up to the fench and turned around and ran away.

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    Member H20Dogg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kahahawai View Post
    If your setting one up, make sure you have a good ground, thats why its worth testing by touching it. .........serious thought though, careful not to urinate on it in the middle of the night when you get out of the tent.....not sure what it would feel like.
    Ditto, no pee. ouch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kahahawai View Post
    If your setting one up, make sure you have a good ground, thats why its worth testing by touching it. .........serious thought though, careful not to urinate on it in the middle of the night when you get out of the tent.....not sure what it would feel like.
    When I was younger than 10 yo my best buddy did this. I can still hear his yell'n. Ouch!

  10. #10

    Default They Work GREAT!

    I have 2 friends with planes and we have been using electric fences to protect planes and our camps for well over 10 years, probably like 15 years, while hunting Units 15, 7, 9, and 16 with fish and bear thick; result, zero problems. Last spring was proof positive at their black bear bait station. When brownies took over the bait station we decided to give the fence a real test. We reset the original station and then setup another station 20 yards away and put the fence up around the second set. Results? Original set was torn apart / destroyed 3 days in a row, the electric fenced station was never touched!!!! IMO electric fences are worth their weight in gold! Really helps me sleep soundly in bear country!

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    ya they sure knock the snot outa me everytime I touch it on low for my horses and dogs, turned up on high well lets just say come on over and you check out it's kick, Im scared of it
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    i work in the field every summer, and we use bear fences to protect our camps, "almost" every time a bear had touched the fence with either his paw or nose it was run away time. i say almost because if a bear steps through the fence without touching bare skin to the fence the hair will not conduct the current through to the bear. we have had 3 or 4 bears get through our fences this way. that is 3 or 4 out of 50+ though. i would give the bear fences a strong recomendation

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    What about gravel bars?
    I talked with someone at UDAP. He said that it was very likely that the fence will not work on gravel bars or sand. He suggested their mesh "food fence" setup. But that setup is very expensive...

    The folks at Eagle Enterprises in Anchorage say the same thing...
    http://www.electrobearguard.com/Product.html



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    Member Jeff U's Avatar
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    Based on my Bear hunt last May, they are not 100%.
    A bear stepped on one of our bear fence poles, snapped it at the based, laid the line flat to the ground and came in.
    Destroyed the tent and went thru the coolers.

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    When using an electric fence on a gravel bar run the lower wire as a ground. The UDAP instructions include this. A metal stake is inserted the best you can into the gravel bar and connected through another wire to the lower fence wire and to the ground wire of the charger. In the event the bear is not making a good ground contact through his pads and the rocks, hopefully touching a hot upper wire and grounded lower wire will provide a shock. I use a cheap electric fence tester from Lowe's to ensure my fence is working. I don't like getting shocked myself. My kids dare each other to touch it. They've learned the difference in grounding properties of wet boots, dry boots, and no boots. lol

    I have yet to see evidence of a bear touching my fence. I'd prefer this to actually seeing it in action for real. I sleep better knowing I have one more layer of protection.

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    Default Need a fence tester too

    Quote Originally Posted by Birdstrike View Post
    I use a cheap electric fence tester from Lowe's to ensure my fence is working.
    Me too, except I bought mine online. I chose the digital output model instead of the dumb light (is, or isn't charged is the only indicator) because now I can come back to camp and still see 5K volts and know that no discharges have been made from my measly little two D cell batteries. Discharges can happen from either a jolt to an animal, or from vegetation hitting your hot wires, so its important to know if the batteries still have full juice. Plus, the tester adds mere ounces to your load. First time I hooked my fence up it was wrong and was NOT charged; I wouldn't have known this without a tester.

    I also run the bottom of three wires as ground, for the same reason. Smart.

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    Me too, except I bought mine online. I chose the digital output model instead of the dumb light (is, or isn't charged is the only indicator) because now I can come back to camp and still see 5K volts and know that no discharges have been made from my measly little two D cell batteries. Discharges can happen from either a jolt to an animal, or from vegetation hitting your hot wires, so its important to know if the batteries still have full juice. Plus, the tester adds mere ounces to your load. First time I hooked my fence up it was wrong and was NOT charged; I wouldn't have known this without a tester.

    I also run the bottom of three wires as ground, for the same reason. Smart.
    I figured you'd save the money and just relieve yourself on it for a test.

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    Default "experienced"

    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    I figured you'd save the money and just relieve yourself on it for a test.
    As a man of great "experience" like I, I'm sure you'll appreciate that about 40 years ago I saw my best friend do exactly that. I still hear the screams today.......

    Me, I'd rather pay 15 bucks online, instead of that "thrill" ......... ok, I'm boring......

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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    Me too, except I bought mine online. I chose the digital output model instead of the dumb light (is, or isn't charged is the only indicator) because now I can come back to camp and still see 5K volts and know that no discharges have been made from my measly little two D cell batteries. Discharges can happen from either a jolt to an animal, or from vegetation hitting your hot wires, so its important to know if the batteries still have full juice. Plus, the tester adds mere ounces to your load. First time I hooked my fence up it was wrong and was NOT charged; I wouldn't have known this without a tester.

    I also run the bottom of three wires as ground, for the same reason. Smart.
    The voltage (5-6k) supply to the fence is a hi-voltage pulse, (refreshed every ˝ second or so) an animal or vegetation would need to hold on for a very long time to discharge the battery. If you were worried about battery life I would measure the battery voltage not the fence.

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    I'm going to third the recommendation to get a tester! I have temporary and fixed shock fence all around my house/pastures and it hurts, especially when the ground's wet. When the soil gets really dry the shock definitely goes down.

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