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Thread: Caribou meat

  1. #1
    Member jcorwin4278's Avatar
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    Default Caribou meat

    So no one in my family like caribou. My brother-in-law shot one a couple of years ago and it was "gamey". I have never had a problem eating caribou meat and the meat they had tasted fine to me. What can I do to make it better for my family to eat. The only steaks Im gonna do are the tenderloins and backstraps for me for hunting. Rest will be burger and snack stix. Anything someone can tell me would help. Thanks
    Hunt until you don't like it any more

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Encourage your family to try it for 2nd time. Maybe the caribou you had prior was not cared for properly, prepped properly, etc....
    If you took care of your end of business and the butcher did his job, you should have some fine meat.
    Or, cover it up with Jalapeno dogs, bkfst sausage, hot stix, caribou bacon, corned brisket caribou, and so on.
    BK

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    This last year I finally had caribou that tasted "gamey" and I think because it didn't drop where it was shot and we had to follow it up. Put it in with something, we have a receipe that has golden mushroom soup and a couple other things in it that really is good. People don't realize its caribou. Barring that, do what bk said. Caribou meat is pretty good in mho.

  4. #4

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    Doing your own butchering is the only way to know what is going on with your meat. My experiences are with white-tailed deer only. All meat is boned and I never cut through bone as the marrow and bone dust can taint the meat. I used to mix pork or beef fat in the ground but haven't for the past 15 years. Just brown the meat in some olive oil. Now I leave all "steak" sections as whole roasts. I dry rub the outside (black pepper, garlic and onion powder and other spices, little or no salt) and slow roast at about 300 degrees til med rare-to-medium. Remove from heat and let roast "rest" for 10 minutes, all the juices on the outer surface will be re-absorbed to the center (equilibrium). Then slice it to desired thickness, I like it 1/4" and pour any drippings over the sliced meat. The wife prepare a nice French Dip with other roast sections...4-6 hours in a crock pot with an onion soup type broth, the fork/tease the meat apart (slicing it makes it feel chewy) put on french bread and dip away.

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    Member roughneck6883's Avatar
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    Default rutting bou

    I shot a rutting bou and couldnt eat it not even in spaggeti,tacos, not anything but it was early oct and I was warned and brushed it off. never again will I hunt rutting bou. but it was edible as sausage and jerky thtas all I got
    "Horns make pi$* poor soup"

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    We're new at this but found two standout ideas for our caribou. My wife cooked a roast in the crock pot, with potatoes, onion beef broth and onion soup mix, which turned out great.

    The second thing: was caribou stick. We had quite a bit of the meat processed (Mike's Meats, Eagle River) like pepperoni stick - with added fat, 15% I think. Everyone in my family has liked it. Very tasty - snacking good.

    Good luck.

  7. #7
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    I've shot several bou and done all of my butchering myself. I dont cut the bones apart either, I dont add any fat to it. I leave large the pieces I can to make roasts and steaks and then I cut some of it up into like 1/2" cubes for stirfry and tacos, then I grind whatever cant be made into roasts steaks or chunks. The roasts we just put in a crock pot and let them slow cook for several hours till you can pull them apart with a fork. I think there is some liquid smoke that goes into the pot with some water and other seasonings to tantalize you the whole time it cooks. I take the steak size pieces of meat and leave them whole to freeze, when Im ready for some steak I partially thaw them out and cut them thick- about 1/2" to 3/4" thick and put on some salt and pepper and Luhr Jensen (very hard to find in these parts) steak seasoning. Then grill them till they are about medium. Dont overdo it as they get super tough and very chewy if you overdo it. This seems to work well for us- havent noticed a difference in animals if they fall where shot or if there was a less than desireable shot made. Seems that the winter ones taste best. November and January ones. Never, never, never, did i mention never shoot a big bull in October, I made that mistake once. I think a friend still has some in a freezer from that trip 5 years ago. Its not edible. Good luck, I perfer bou over moose.

  8. #8
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Time of year is huge. When did you shoot your caribou? From opening day until mid September, caribou is among the finest-eating meats out there, bar none. From mid September through early November, though, I would only consider shooting a cow if table quality if your priority. Shoot an early August caribou and put it before your family again - I'd bet they will love it.

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    Couldn't agree more- time of year, plus field care. When we first moved up here, had several people tell me that "Caribou meat's only good for making sausage." I had a hard time wondering why that was, especially after shooting several animals and really enjoying the steaks, roasts, etc. Then a number of years ago we were driving the Denali Highway during one of the "subsistence" hunts and came across a couple of guys sitting under the awning next to their camper, and a nice bull laid out on a 4-wheeler trailer in the sunshine. Stopped to talk to them for a bit- they'd taken the animal that morning, gutted it and hauled it out, and there it sat, hide on, baking in the sun. I'll bet those steaks tasted a bit gamey, too!

  10. #10
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    I've never had a gamey caribou (and I've killed my share), but I did get some gamey venison off a Wyoming mule deer a while back. It was a very mature buck smack in the middle of the rut (huge neck). The deer was shot late in the evening, gutted it and propped open for the night and butchered the next morning. It didn't get very cold that night, maybe into the 40's. We butchered it the next morning, put it on ice for the 30 hour drive back home. All the other deer we shot on that trip were great, but this one was inedible. It had an extremely strong gamey taste. It must have been the fact that the deer was in the rut, although, I've shot other deer in the rut that weren't bad at all.

  11. #11
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    As others have said- time of year is huge when it comes to bulls. A nice young August bull is fine eating and cows are good anytime. A late Sept. bull can be nearly inedible.

    For roasts or steaks cooking in the crockpot is the only way to fly- low and slow.
    Bou makes excellent sausages and pepperoni as well.

  12. #12
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    Grilled caribou steaks....wrapped in bacon....cooked to medium rare (and served HOT)...I served this to many a greenie in Seattle when I was down there for school, they thought it was A O K.

    The medium rare part is key for any venision IMHO. I personally prefer moose over caribou but it eats just fine... a little "livery" if I was to attempt to describe it's flavor. And mine was a nice velvety young bull in early Sept. but I'd take many other animals again before worrying about caribou if given the choice.

    Also, don't forget summer sausage....really easy to make and not as much fuss as links, just grind,....mix....stuff....smoke...and eat.

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    I ate some caribou burger a few years ago that I really did not care that much for- gamey and tough to chew (even ground!). This year I was able to get a pound of moose burger from a fellow AOF member that was GREAT. Wife want to know where I could go to get a moose for the freezer. Unfortunately it would be over 1000 miles away plus tags are VERY hard (and EXPENSIVE) to get.

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