View Poll Results: How do you camp cook your Fresh Catch?

Voters
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  • Grill over wood.

    17 28.33%
  • Grill over charcoals.

    10 16.67%
  • Grill over wood in aluminum

    14 23.33%
  • Gill over charcoals in aluminum

    6 10.00%
  • Gas stove

    1 1.67%
  • In my Camper in a frying pan

    0 0%
  • Grill over wood in frying pan

    4 6.67%
  • Grill over coals in frying pan

    2 3.33%
  • Grill over gas stove in frying pan

    4 6.67%
  • I don't, I eat it RAW!!! SLRRRRPPP WASABI!!!!

    2 3.33%
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Thread: Camp cooking

  1. #1
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    Default Camp cooking

    How do you camp cook your catch?

    Me I like to grill it over either wood or coals, in particular if it's a fresh caught king salmon, I like to fillet it & even eat the fattest part of the fish which is the narrow upper strip right behind the head when filleted...MMMMMMM that is better than Prime Rib Fat!!! SLRRRRPPP!!!!

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    gogoalie - You didn't put under the fire/coals in aluminum as an option. I bury the fish under the burning embers of the fire, wrapped in aluminum with onions, butter, spices, etc. Also bury a few onions and potatoes while I'm at it. Getting a little hungry...

    -Brian

  3. #3
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    Thumbs up

    Fresh bellies—king or sockeye—over charcoal on the Weber. . .

  4. #4
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    Talking Bellies!!

    now youre talking Marcus! gotta love those fatty,tasty king bellies!! Even better when they're pickled.

    Kills me that so many people throw away the best part of the fish!

  5. #5

    Thumbs up Fresh kings

    The best salmon i ever ate was a 7lb jack king salmon caught 15 minutes before we grilled it over an open fire!!!

  6. #6
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    Default

    Brian's got the right idea. There is something about burrying the fish under the embers, tightly rapped in tin-foil w/onions and tons of butter (except for health nutts), and whatever other veggies you have on hand, that makes a mean meal. I would hardly touch fish before I started preparing them this way. Works with any type of fish and all it requires is tin foil.

    NRH

  7. #7

    Default eating fish

    I love a couple of thin slices of very fresh salmon with just lemon soy and wasabie. Halibut you can cook any way and it is great. Pike a put in the pressure cooker and cook until the bones melt then i cool the meat down and make fish cakes out of it. Yes i do work as a chef for a living! Willing to share recipes if asked

  8. #8
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Ohhh baby! Here's the way!

    Nothing like a fresh sockeye fillet cooked on the riverbank over charcoal! Here's what we like:

    Put a fresh fillet in a two-gallon ziplock bag and dump about a half quart of Yoshida's Original Gourmet Sauce all over it. Maybe toss in a little powdered garlic (or fresh; BAM!), close up the bag and let it marinate in your cooler all day. Make sure it is laying flesh-side down, so the meat absorbs the Yoshida's. Make a fire with charcoal and when the charcoal is ashed-over, place the fillet skin-side-down on a grill over the fire. Then put some aluminum foil over the fillet, in a tent-style setup so the foil doesn't touch the fish. This traps the heat and reflects it back onto the fillet. Takes about ten minutes to cook one this way, and man is it good! Our salmon are tender and have plenty of natural oil, but you still must be careful not to overcook them. If you overcook, it will be really dry.

    Anyway, this is our tried-and-true river recipe. You will NOT have any leftovers! Absolutely delicious.

    Charcoal seems to work best; better than wood in my opinion. I think it's because our wood up here just doesn't make good coals. Or maybe it's because I'm too impatient to wait for coals? We've used willow and alder and it just takes too long.

    Now you guys have got me hungry. I'm headed downstairs now to dig a fillet out of the freezer for tomorrow's dinner...

    The attached photo shows the results.

    -Mike
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  9. #9
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    Thumbs up Simple but oh so tasty

    On my last two hunt trips we caught our dinner one or two nights and I just put each fish in tin foil with some butter, garlic powder and two strips of bacon. I place them in the wood fire and 20 minutes later...voila! It' my favorite way to grill them at home but, at least for me, it always tastes better when I'm camping.

  10. #10
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    Default

    One of my fav's is to get a big pile of alder "beaver wood" and get some good coal's going..........lightly seasoned and med rare!

    I keep a small bottle of soy sauce in my back pocket when filleting salmon for a teaser or two!

    For grayling I scale them and dredge them in krusteez (I rarely have plain flour on a hunt or fishing trip, but it would do just as good) and fry them in hot bacon grease, with spuds & onions on the side..........Yummy! I do trout the same minus the scaleing.

    Fresh fish is great and it matters little what method was used, just as long as it's properly cooked.

    -Ron

  11. #11
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    Default gogoalie

    Not to try & taint any results, but I just find cooking fish over wood tastes better, as you get a nice smoked flavor that you can't get from charcoal, I've done a mix of both Charcoal & wood & found the results as tasty, but I prefer the wood smoked flavor over charcoal anyday.

    Yes Tinfoil with coals over them as well as under them is a great way to cook them but you don't get the grilled flavor as you would if you let the smoke permeate the flesh.

    I eat a small portion of the flesh of my first caught salmon raw just to enjoy it, it's awesome with a little salt, & even better with soy or teriyaki...

    I can't imagine what it would taste like withsome seaweed rice, avacado, crab & herring eggs with wasabi!!!! SLLLLRRRRP is all I can say...

  12. #12
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    Thumbs up Yeah buddy

    Quote Originally Posted by B_M
    gogoalie - You didn't put under the fire/coals in aluminum as an option. I bury the fish under the burning embers of the fire, wrapped in aluminum with onions, butter, spices, etc. Also bury a few onions and potatoes while I'm at it. Getting a little hungry...

    -Brian
    When cooking in camp, I tend to love cooking over wood and the coals thereafter. I use cast iron frying pans and dutch ovens, but fresh fish goes right in aluminum foil with lemon pepper, garlic, butter and onions with potatoes on the side... quick, easy clean up, gourmet cookin, camp style!

  13. #13
    Member faemystique's Avatar
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    Talking mmmm

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan
    Nothing like a fresh sockeye fillet cooked on the riverbank over charcoal! Here's what we like:

    Put a fresh fillet in a two-gallon ziplock bag and dump about a half quart of Yoshida's Original Gourmet Sauce all over it. Maybe toss in a little powdered garlic (or fresh; BAM!), close up the bag and let it marinate in your cooler all day. Make sure it is laying flesh-side down, so the meat absorbs the Yoshida's. Make a fire with charcoal and when the charcoal is ashed-over, place the fillet skin-side-down on a grill over the fire. Then put some aluminum foil over the fillet, in a tent-style setup so the foil doesn't touch the fish. This traps the heat and reflects it back onto the fillet. Takes about ten minutes to cook one this way, and man is it good! Our salmon are tender and have plenty of natural oil, but you still must be careful not to overcook them. If you overcook, it will be really dry.

    Anyway, this is our tried-and-true river recipe. You will NOT have any leftovers! Absolutely delicious.

    Charcoal seems to work best; better than wood in my opinion. I think it's because our wood up here just doesn't make good coals. Or maybe it's because I'm too impatient to wait for coals? We've used willow and alder and it just takes too long.

    Now you guys have got me hungry. I'm headed downstairs now to dig a fillet out of the freezer for tomorrow's dinner...

    The attached photo shows the results.

    -Mike
    That sounds awesome... I think I will try it over wood coals though. I love cooking over wood while camping, so I think the same concept with the tented aluminum would do good to trap smoke flavor into the fish as well?

    Yummy....

    Need time off of nursing school to get out and fry some up...

  14. #14
    Member faemystique's Avatar
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    Cool Filet out the bones?

    Quote Originally Posted by viktor
    I love a couple of thin slices of very fresh salmon with just lemon soy and wasabie. Halibut you can cook any way and it is great. Pike a put in the pressure cooker and cook until the bones melt then i cool the meat down and make fish cakes out of it. Yes i do work as a chef for a living! Willing to share recipes if asked
    I have grown up eating "Northerns" as we say back in Wisconnie.. They sure are bony! I hadn't thought of cooking them that way before.. interesting!

    I also learned early on how to filet out the bones... my mom did it, but gma didnt'... so I did plenty of picking out northern bones...

    But I have to say my favorite way to eat "pike" is to deepfry it in a flour/cornmeal mixture. Seasoning the meat first is key, then dip in egg/milk, then the flour mixture, and fry away. Eat with slices of raw onion... mmmm

    Halibut I have a separate recipe. Everyone who eats it raves about it. My husband makes Halibut Olympia and I make deep fried Halibut.

    Its a messy long process, but well worth it.

    Season both sides of the filets that have been made into serving sizes. Lemon pepper, granulated garlic, season all salt, etc...

    Make four bowls up: one with milk, one with scrambled raw egg, one with potato flakes, one with a mix of flour and cornmeal and some salt and pepper.

    Have oil ready, dip filets in egg, then flour, milk then potato flakes, then place in oil. The potato flakes make an awesome flaky crust and the flavor is GREAT... just be sure your oil is the right temp and don't over cook.

    Warning if you use it in a restraunt I want credit... haha...

    Carey

  15. #15
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    Default Follow the MicMacs...

    This Eastern tribe was credited with the origins of planked salmon. They would take the fillet and lay it skin side down on a chunk of flat cedar that they hacked and then pegged with whittled spikes around the edge. They would then use slim green vines to criss-cross and hold the fish in place.

    Cooking the fillet was easy. They merely propped the prepared planks around their fire rings and let the reflective heat do the rest. Flavor of the cedar would then be imparted into the fish.

    The modern day angler/chef has it easy on this one. Buy your board, pre-set the edges with flat head screws, and use a little wire to string it.

    Bon Appetite...

    P.S. Quit throwing away those salmon skins! Remove the slime with a bristle, cut into pieces the size of potato chips, and imerse into hot oil. Drained and cooled, this makes a tremendous appetizer when dipped into a sweet and sour sauce pinched with a little wasabi.

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

  16. #16
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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by viktor
    Yes i do work as a chef for a living! Willing to share recipes if asked
    Here's a start—one of the best I've come across, perhaps the best all-'round recipe for fish and more because of the infinite possibilities of spice and seasoning in the rice flour:

    Panko Fish
    1 lb. boneless, skinless fish, cut into bite-sized chunks
    1 cup peanut oil
    1 cup panko (Japanese bread crumbs, boxed,usually in the Asian section of your supermarket)
    1/2 cup rice flour
    Your choice of spices (Try 1/2 t. each of lemon pepper, salt, dill, and Cajun spices—etc., etc., etc. . .)
    1 large egg
    1 T. milk
    Preheat oil (about 1/2-inch deep) in wok to 350-375 degrees. Mix rice flour and spices in a plastic bag, then add fish and shake until all pieces are coated. Beat egg and milk in small bowl. Dip fish in egg mixture, one piece at a time. Let drain, then roll and press into bread crumbs until well coated. Lay pieces aside until you have enough for a batch. Cook about 1 minute or until golden. Don't crowd pieces, and don't overcook. Turn with tongs when ready, and repeat on other side. Place finished pieces on rack to drain. After draining, fish can be placed in an uncovered bowl and kept warm in the oven until ready to serve. Serve with your favorite sauce. With fish, try mayonnaise with chopped sweet pickle, sort of a poor-man's tartar sauce. If you have any left over, warm it up in a saute pan, turning the pieces once. It will be as crisp and good as it was the day before. There's no end to what you can cook this way.

  17. #17

    Default cooking recipe for fresh fish

    Salmon fillet skinless pull all the little bones out with tweezers if you like

    Apple juice concentrate 1 cup
    cinnamon stick 2 each
    star anise 1 each
    celery ribs sliced 1 each
    1/2 onion sliced
    parsley stems 4 each
    carrot sliced 1 each
    sugar 1 cup
    lemon sliced 1/2
    salt 3 tbl
    liquid smoke 2 tsp

    Let fish soak in this marinade for three days

    Drain and let dry a little

    You can now cook any way that you wish or let dry until tacky and smoke
    You can drain the marinade and thicken with a little corn starch and cold water slurry.

    This recipe is great especially for older last year salmon as the flavor is slightly masked. It also works very well for the fresh salmon as the apple sweetness really brings out the flavor of the fish. You can use honey in place of the sugar if you wish.
    Enjoy!! Chef Viktor

  18. #18
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    Wink Voting only once.

    The poll won't allow me to vote more than once. I enjoy both grilling on charcoal and wood, but went with charcoal, but raw, good sashimi cuts, are the other favorite I'd like to vote for. The dip of choice is Chinese or Colman's mustard mixed with Japanese soy sauce. Another great dip is soy sauce and lemon. I guess the web design's preventing me from joining in the great tradition of ballot box stuffers.

    You guys ever invite folks to dinner?

  19. #19
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by viktor
    This recipe is great especially for older last year salmon as the flavor is slightly masked.
    Here's my take: Any time I thaw salmon frozen for more than, say, three or four months, I skim a thin layer off the top of the piece with an electric knife or razor-sharp fillet knife and cut off an 1/8th inch or so all 'round the edges. More — much more — if there is any hint of off-color.

    The off-taste one can encounter with frozen salmon is the beginnings of freezer burn — the fat in the flesh becoming rancid. Trimmed as above, it's hard to tell year-old salmon from fresh. To me, anyway. . .

  20. #20
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    Smile

    If I understand how to attach photos, here's what you'll see below: 1) a 4" piece of king fillet; 2) boned, trimmed and skimmed as in the message above; 3) the 4" piece cut into two 2" pieces; 4) each piece cut down to but not through the skin; 5) each piece folded skin-to-skin producing two 1" steaks
    Last edited by Marcus; 03-13-2007 at 08:14.

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