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Thread: Weighted flies

  1. #1

    Default Weighted flies

    Hi guys,

    I have been tying a bunch of flies lately and was told to tie them pretty heavily weighted. Do you tie many that are unweighted? Also, what is the definition of heavily weighted? I will be targeting salmon in about 2 weeks.

    Thanks

    Tim

  2. #2

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    I even put some weight on conehead flies, so those have additional weight. Is it a good idea not to use anyn weight on some?

    Tim

  3. #3
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    Depends on the water you are fishing. The general idea is that you want the fly bouncing off the bottom. If you are fishing slower water it will require less weight, so a variety of weights is a good idea.

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    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    I found out properly placed metal eyes on sculpin patterns work really well trolling a lake through the weeds, where the fish are. The weight of the eyes turn the hook so its pointing up and you can troll weeds w/o snagging one of them, I've personally been knocking some boots in the weeds on the valley lakes lately...thought it was worth mentioning...





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  5. #5

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    Thanks guys, I will make sure I have a weighted varity of flies in my aresonal. I will mainly be fishing the kenai peninsula, as well as Bird and Ship creeks, the Su and a couple of other streams. Does anyone use clausers in streams? I mainly have bunnies, esls, and other similar type flies. Mainly targeting the salmon starting 8-11

    Tim

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    Member Theone2's Avatar
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    It is good to have weighted flies so the fly will sink down to where the fishes mouth is. Some people also use weighted line. I use two splitshot weights about 2 feet above the fly because I use a floating line and that way the fly can get to where the salmon are. I have a lot of flies that are unweighted. The best luck I have is anything really with the color pink. Egg sucking leaches are a great pick as well.
    Good Luck
    -Zach
    "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing it is not fish they are after."
    -Henry David Thoreau

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    just remember to 'duck when you chuck', also i move my rod tip in an oval over head so i will not whack the rod with that heavy fly. i think that is call a 'belgian cast?' they must throw weighted flies as well.

  8. #8
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rippinlip View Post
    Depends on the water you are fishing. The general idea is that you want the fly bouncing off the bottom. If you are fishing slower water it will require less weight, so a variety of weights is a good idea.
    Agree - and with fullbush's comment too. The water isn't always deep or fast. A lighter fly is at times handy. Bill England, who taught us to tie at Mtn View Sports in 2003 used to tie his Wooly Buggers with different colors coding for different weights. Some variety can be handy. Like fullbush described, even the distribution of the weight can alter your fly's action in the water - to your advantage.

    Best of luck.

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    I was fishing the anchor river one evening pretty late and nothing was biting, even the egg guys with big globs of cured eggs weren't doing anything so I tied on a nice clouser I had tied just for the trip and on the first or second cast a nice silver slammed it as I stripped it in , that made my day !!!!!! I would take a couple along , maybe the extra weight from the barbell eyes helped get it down a little deeper than a normal fly.
    chugbugs are for big bass -topwater!

  10. #10
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    I weight most of my nymphs and streamers. I weight most everything but some caddis pupas, midges, and emerger patters. All my flesh flies, buggers, leechs, etc (streamers) are weighted. Either with lead wire or cone/bead heads or both. Shot can always be added to get down deeper
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