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Thread: looking for info on ocean boats

  1. #1
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    Default looking for info on ocean boats

    I am looking into buying an ocean boat for fishing out of homer seward and whitter. I have in mind i am looking for something that is around 24ft long with an enclosed cabin with a bunk. I am also leaning toward a fiberglass boat dew to they can handle the rough water better. I have owned a boat before just not an ocean boat.

    I would like info on
    boats that have motor problems
    hull that have problems
    inboard verse outboard
    boats that just dont travel well

    and any other info and things to look for when looking at boats
    thanks

  2. #2
    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    I will summarize the upcoming responses before they start coming in:

    1. Whatever boat someone currently has is the best boat for everyone.
    2. Fiberglass vs. Aluminum will start a few fights. Whatever someone currently has is the best.
    3. Inboard vs. Outboard will start more fights. Again, whatever someone currently has is the best.
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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    The biggest thing I have learned is that whatever size you think you will need go at least two feet bigger..... 4 would be better....

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    Don't take this the wrong way, but instead of asking members here to write a book on what they know, like and dislike try another approach.
    First, find a boat you like then ask about it's good and bad points. Even then, it is hard to wade through the BS on here and find the truly informed answers. To many internet posters are experts in every area even though most of the time they have never owned what they are commenting about.
    Don't be afraid to ask a person replying to a post.........."How do you know this to be true?" Sometimes this question stops them in their tracks.

    If you don't have a clue as to which boat model you want, visit the docks at Homer and Seward and ask a lot of questions. Much to learn this way.
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  5. #5

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    There are lots of nice boats in that size and I think you are going to get a LOT of argument that aluminum boats can't handle rough water as they simply can and do as well as anything else. The 24 and 26 foot Hewescraft's are very nice affordable boats that are extremely popular in Alaska. They have good dealer support if you are buying new. The Osprey is a very good ocean boat available in a 24 footer. It is very capable, has decent efficiency, and fisherman love them. Seasports are also available in that size and have positives very similar to the Osprey. Unfortunately, you can't buy them new anymore as the sons of the original owners in Bellingham ran the company into the ground. It is unlikely you will have hull problems with any of these brands.

    You will also find a zillion bayliners for sale. They are not what I would call bad boats at all, but they are mass produced and have a reputation as having problems. I bought a really old one (early 70s) years ago and it was very well built with no cracks, no blisters, and a nice gel coat. It had a 6 cylinder engine and was a very economical way to get out on the water. Some bayliners had stringer problems, glass problems, and transom problems depending on the model you are talking about. But with that, there are really good one too.

    I personally run a C-Dory and love them, but they are not the fastest boat in the fleet. Nor or they the smoothest as they are nearly a flat bottom boat. But the build is good and they are very capable in the snot. The best part, at least in my opinion, is the fuel economy they get. Nothing can touch them in those regards.

    As far as inboard or outboard, both are very reliable and good. I prefer outboards, but have had very good luck with inboards. I maintain things meticulously and generally are pretty easy on machinery, so that probably plays into it as well.

    Good luck in your search. I remember buying my first ocean boat and I don't know if this is your first one, but when I bought mine it was one of the happiest days in my life.

  6. #6
    Member akblackdawg's Avatar
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    If you are only looking for a 24 ft boat, you are not really looking for a ocean boat, but a bay boat and day tripper you can take in the swells when it is nice out. If that is the case, get something with some power and speed so if the wind comes up or it gets nasty and rough you can get in before it gets worse. I've seen 24 ft boats waiting at Culrose for the wind to stop before making a run over to Decision point and smoother water, and that to cross "protected" waters. An ocean boat is something you would feel comfortable in crossing over from Elfin Cove to PWS in. I've made the trip twice, in a 36 ft and a 41 ft. In the size boat you are looking for, get something with at least 16 degree deadrise or more, not flat bottom. Bud
    Wasilla

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by akblackdawg View Post
    If you are only looking for a 24 ft boat, you are not really looking for a ocean boat, but a bay boat and day tripper you can take in the swells when it is nice out. If that is the case, get something with some power and speed so if the wind comes up or it gets nasty and rough you can get in before it gets worse. I've seen 24 ft boats waiting at Culrose for the wind to stop before making a run over to Decision point and smoother water, and that to cross "protected" waters. An ocean boat is something you would feel comfortable in crossing over from Elfin Cove to PWS in. I've made the trip twice, in a 36 ft and a 41 ft. In the size boat you are looking for, get something with at least 16 degree deadrise or more, not flat bottom. Bud
    I don't know this, but I think he is looking for a boat one can realistically trailer from place to place.

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    Member akblackdawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by T.R. Bauer View Post
    I don't know this, but I think he is looking for a boat one can realistically trailer from place to place.
    That could be, I just hope he is realistic about the capabilities of the boat, of course I've known people who ran 32 ft trailerable boats up from seattle, and I know commercial trollers typically can be pretty small and still very capable in the ocean. Needs to be aware of the capabilities of what he ends up with, and if a light trailer boat, I still suggest speed in case the weather blows up. Bud
    Wasilla

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    yes I am looking for something i can trailer with out a bunch of problems. the boats I have been looking at are bayliner trophy with inboard motors. many of these boats are also in my price range but that could change with time my price range my increase if i feel it is worth it.
    thanks for the info

    what are some of the model bayliners that have had problems

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by skipper View Post
    yes I am looking for something i can trailer with out a bunch of problems. the boats I have been looking at are bayliner trophy with inboard motors. many of these boats are also in my price range but that could change with time my price range my increase if i feel it is worth it.
    thanks for the info

    what are some of the model bayliners that have had problems
    Skipper,

    I think all you will have to do is a google search about Bayliner and learn enough to be horrified. I am not saying I would not buy one as I already did. Mine had a very solid early 70s 23 foot hull and it was tank that was heavy and strong. It didn't have the fluff (or should I say crap) that the newer ones have and the build was simple. Any idiot could work on the inline GM 6 cylinder engine if needed. Flash forward to the 80s and 90s and they just made boats too fast with cheap materials and it hurt their reputation very badly. I think you have to be more careful when shopping for used Bayliners in comparison to Seasport, Osprey, Skagit, Olympic, and C-Dory (others too) - boats the just don't have hull problems because they were carefully laid up with quality materials using a tried and tested design. No matter which boat you look at, and this is by no means a complete list, be sure to look it over very carefully for previous damages, cracks in the glass on the transom and other critical joints, rot around the windows, deck hardware, and other places. If I were seriously looking at any boat, it is worth every penny to go out and get it surveyed by someone other than the guy the seller recommends. Good luck in your seach.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by akblackdawg View Post
    That could be, I just hope he is realistic about the capabilities of the boat, of course I've known people who ran 32 ft trailerable boats up from seattle, and I know commercial trollers typically can be pretty small and still very capable in the ocean. Needs to be aware of the capabilities of what he ends up with, and if a light trailer boat, I still suggest speed in case the weather blows up. Bud
    And don't go far either I have to admit it, I am an fair weather, high pressure, flat seas type of guy. And like you noted, I can't imagine trying to outrun a storm at hull speed........A person should probably turn tail and run a bit sooner....He's looking at Bayliners....

  12. #12
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Boat design is always a compromise, as is "seaworthiness"

    As I have a trailerable boat that I use primarly out of Whittier and Seward, here are some thoughts on things I'd look for in such a boat:

    Comfortable and predictable handling up to 4-6' seas, and you can run at cruising speed in a 1+' chop. I think you'll find a semi-V to deep V with some flare to the hull sides are going to handle these conditions overall best. The hull the is best at bashing headon through big swells likely isn't the best for all conditions you'll face.

    Speed, fishing out of Seward, and especially Whittier involves fairly long runs. If you want to spend more time fishing than boating, then IMHO you want a cruise speed in the 22-25 knot range, and WOT of 30+knots.

    Fuel efficiency, you need to consider opperating costs just as much as the purchase price. Sometimes spending a little more upfront can save you down the road, so fully understand what it will cost to opperate any boat you are considering, and factor in any repairs or upgrades that may be required. Typically great deal fixer upper boats will cost you more than getting a clean sorted out well maintained boat, in fact I'd say that's almost always the case.

    Inboard vs. outboard. Warning I'm biased because I run an outboard, but IMHO for good reasons. Here's why I don't like inboards on a 24' or smaller boat, and I'm assuming a gas inboard as you typically have to go to the bigger boats to get a diesel.

    The dog box that houses the engine takes up alot of your fishing deck, yet the engine is squezed so tight in there that it's PITA to work on it. I do not like below the water line holes in a hull, and an I/O has a monsterous hole right through the transom. Should you have a fuel leak and fire, it's right in the boat, likely right next to the fuel tank. They seem to have a nasty habbit of exhaust headers failing, I don't recall ever hearing of o/b's having cracked exhaust manifolds, inboards seem to have a frequent problem with that.

    And hull material, what the hull is made of has no bearing on how it perfoms, that is solely a function of the hull shape. Our boating seasons are short, and finding weather that cooperates with painting is right the height of the boating season. I have a wood composite boat, trying to coordinate my free time and weather for upkeep and repairs has been a challenge at best.

    So, in my opinion, and I don't own one, something along the lines of a hewescraft pacific cruiser 240 with a 175 o/b would be about the best balanced boat for your application.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  13. #13
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    Skipper,

    A price range is the first thing you need to tell us. That dictates a lot of things. You indicated that you were looking at trailerable Bayliner Trophies. I see a lot of these in the $12-$25k range (most under $20k). Most Trophies are i/o sterndrives but there are a few (rare) outboard versions out there.

    The trophy is a great price day trip (overnighter for 2) kind of boat, but it is also a starter boat too, but money is a driving factor and many trophies have found permanent homes too. The trophy is also pretty economical to run as well.

    In general an outboard will be more reliable, but an i/o is cheaper to repower on a $/hp (but the actual sterndrive is another discussion).

    Sobie2

    ps a new 240 Hewescraft is a $70k ish boat

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    Shop down in SE AK for a used 24' or 26' olympic with recent 4-stroke outboard power. I've seen a few for sale over the last few years with outboard brackets and honda 225 power. So long as the hull is sound (get it surveyed), a boat like that would fish anywhere a hewes of comparable size would, for 1/3 to 1/2 the dough.

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    T.R. I beg to differ. My 93 Trophy is a solid boat, no blisters, cracks or other major problems. I feel fiberglass boats are quieter than aluminium and I feel they tend to ride a bit smoother as they are definatly heavier. Down side is they use more fuel both towing and running. You also have to be more careful on where you go, you can beach an aluminium easier than a fiberglass, not because of holing but scratches in the gel coat. (fiberglass is plenty strong enough to beach) You can also weld aluminium, you can repair glass but to me it always looks repaired. I also tend to like outboards as I have yet to find anyone who can pull start a 350 chevy..... but they cost more to maintain and repair. I will say my next one will be aluminium with outboards.
    2000 Bayliner Ciera Express 2452
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  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskanmutt View Post
    T.R. I beg to differ. My 93 Trophy is a solid boat, no blisters, cracks or other major problems. I feel fiberglass boats are quieter than aluminium and I feel they tend to ride a bit smoother as they are definatly heavier. Down side is they use more fuel both towing and running. You also have to be more careful on where you go, you can beach an aluminium easier than a fiberglass, not because of holing but scratches in the gel coat. (fiberglass is plenty strong enough to beach) You can also weld aluminium, you can repair glass but to me it always looks repaired. I also tend to like outboards as I have yet to find anyone who can pull start a 350 chevy..... but they cost more to maintain and repair. I will say my next one will be aluminium with outboards.
    Mutt,

    I don't think we are differing at all except that aluminum boats ride worse. Sure they can (no pun intended), but if well designed they don't have too. Anyway, back to Bayliners; there were good ones and there were really bad ones in Bayliner boats. And I'm not making it up as their problems are pretty well documented online and in the court system. All I said was be cautious and get a survey done. How can one argue that???? I personally had great luck with a Bayliner and mine was great. How did you miss that?

    TR

  17. #17
    Member ocnfish's Avatar
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    Let see you said Ocean boat .... right, aluminum or glass some have all these features.

    Low Center of Gravity

    Deep V hull

    Flush deck

    Enclosed waterprofe cabin

    Good GPS/Sounder Radar is a plus, then you can go, slowly, in zero/zero vis, a DSS radio is a plus

    Room for a tender on top

    Built in bouyance, unsinkable

    Big fuel tanks, now have 150 gal

    Extra batteries, I have 2, 24's starting and a 31 for house, all switchable.

    Kicker with high thrust prop

    Nice to have:

    Marine head

    Real refridg

    Cuddy that sleeps atleast two

    Convertable sette to a bed

    Sound system with a marine radio

    1800 watt inverter, then you can make coffee and wife can use curling iron, engine running at 1200 rpm.

    Heater / Stove, I have a Wallace two burnner cermaic top externally vented, love it.

    Hot & Cold water and a good sized sink

    Throw in the laptop and a few good movies

    Extra storage.

    Swim platform for big cooler and using the tender to get to shore to kill animals

    Will not address the glass vs aluminum issues, both are great boats and I have owened both.

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    A boat is like a guitar... don't buy it till you play it! Lot of money to dump into something you may or may not like the feel of. Find one that works for the waters you are going to fish the most.

  19. #19
    Member Alaskanmutt's Avatar
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    Nope TR I caught that.
    I was just meaning to say that like all companies there are good models and years and bad ones. Look at Ferreti, They basically had a couple boats delaminate while running, and they are million dollar boats, but other models are fine.

    And most the aluminium boats I have been in ran fine, just seemed the fg ones were a tad smoother.

    And a survey is ALWAY recommended if you have any question at all. no matter what material it is made of. Only reason I didn't is I knew the previous owner, one of my buddies is his neighbor and I crawled thru it with a scope and a fine tooth comp (scope being one of those fiber optic cameras)
    2000 Bayliner Ciera Express 2452
    5.0 Mercruiser Alpha 1

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    thanks for all of the info it has been very helpfull.
    last question is would a 24ft bayliner trophy have the range to reach green island in PWS from whitter.
    my under standing is these boats get 10-12 gphburn on fuel.

    i think the things i need to look out for is a very good close inspection of the hull and try to stay away from OMC outdrives

    if thier is any other key things I need to look out for please let me know
    thanks for all of the help

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