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Thread: Getting started.

  1. #1
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    Default Getting started.

    I've been very interested in hunting for a while, but I've never had the opportunity to really go for it. I'm wondering what recommendations you would have for someone who is a complete beginner to really all aspects of hunting. I would ideally like to go out with someone more experienced to make sure that I don't injury myself or a bunch of animals without putting them down. I'm interested in being very hands on with everything, including the cleaning and preserving the kill, and I would like to be very thorough in using all parts of the animal. I'm living in Anchorage right now, so anyone near there that would be willing to give me some guidance would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for your time!

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    Member snowbunny's Avatar
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    I highly suggest taking a hunter education course. Visit this website and check out what the state has to offer. It's a very informational course and it's a really fun class...it'll start you out in the right direction. I do suggest signing up as soon as possible, as classes can fill up pretty fast. Good luck! http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=huntered.main

  3. #3

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    Go to Wally World, grab a copy of the hunting regs and study them for a year ! Then you'll understand the complexity of hunting in AK. Then try to find a partner to hunt your desired species.
    Also be sure before you hit the woods you check and make sure the area you intend to hunt hasn't been closed to hunting, this happens often during moose and caribou seasons.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

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    Member northernalberta's Avatar
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    Have you been in Alaska for a year or more? Are you planning to hunt here or in TN?

    I recommend two books, Hunting in Alaska by Chris Batin, and another one called "Dress 'em out", I don't know the author.

    I would say the two most important things are knowing the regs, and knowing how to properly dress the animal. I'm still learning. I never go alone. The better your gear, the easier a time you'll have, but I don't think you need to break the bank.

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    Thanks for the advice. I will definitely check out the hunter education courses.

    I have not been in Alaska for a year, but that is where I plan to take my first hunting trip. Is it a requirement that I live there for a year? I do actually have an Alaskan driver's license that was issued over a year ago if that might help, but I moved back home to Tennessee for a while in between.

    One thing that concerned me was that I don't really have a lot of money for gear, at least not right out the gate. I was wondering if there is some way to rent it? Seems unlikely that someone could rent guns, but who knows! Anyway, thanks again.

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    Member northernalberta's Avatar
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    It's not a requirement, but until you've been here a year you have to get a NON-resident hunting licence, and there are increased restrictions depending where you go. It was REALLY strict for me because I came here from Canada. The licence itself might be more expensive too but I'm not sure. Honestly, my first couple times out, I don't think I even packed a gun... I just went along on a friend's tag and watched him shoot the animal and then helped him gut it and pack it out. But I think you can find reasonably priced 2nd hand rifles on www.alaskaslist.com. If you're not too picky about calibre.

    You might be ok getting a resident hunting licence if you can substantiate that your trip back to Tennessee was just a visit... it's kind of on the honor system anyway... don't want to advise you either way on that one.

    Are you hoping to get out and hunt this fall?

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    carlsdrivein, welcome to the forum and to hunting! You already have some great advice - the hunter safety course is well worth it and you will need it to get licensed. Hopefully you will find someone with experience and patience to guide you along on your new journey - a 22 rifle or shotgun and small game hunts would be an great way to break into hunting for sure.
    There are some great members on here and hopefully one will contact you and offer a friendly hand as it sounds like you have much to absorb! Share a little more info about yourself - like age - time you may have available to spend outdoors, shape your in etc.
    Best of luck to you!
    Randy
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    The very best thing to do is find yourself a old man that still hunts or pretends to. When I was younger if you didn't have a old man by the age of eight or so you were left in the dust. Modern times is hard to find a old man cuss most move to Florida but you didn't want them anyway. Hang out at old out of the way gunshops or early opening greasyspoons,you will know one when you see them. Maybe start a little talk with them and let on you had a yellow lab once that was such a great duck dog he even learned to blow a call and could haul in six greenheads at one time because thats how many that fell most times when you fired a shot. If he says that ain't nothin well then you got ya a old man.Never realy to late to get one till ya are one.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Just wondering as I'm sure many that are reading you post, how long did you live in alaska? You mentioned not having alot of money...well hunting alaska is nothing but lots of money. From travel to gear, it cost $$$$$. I might suggest that you cut your teeth on the deer hunting in Tenn. and gain some experience. Do you have any friends or family in alaska? If you have the time and energy you might look for a job as a packer for a guide and then keep your mouth closed and watch and learn, and earn a little money while your at it.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  10. #10
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    I only lived in Alaska for about five months, mostly in Nome while I was working for the park service there, but since I got back to Tennessee, I've been saving my money up and planning for another trip to Alaska. But I don't believe I'll drive this go around, since I ended up having to ditch my station wagon in the Yukon on the way back. How long I'll stay this time is still undetermined. I have friends that I'm going to live with and I'll try to find a job once I get there, so I'm open to working as a packer. Would there be any specialty site for jobs like that?

    I'm willing to spend money once I get into it, I just wasn't really looking to spend a lot up front before I actually tried it to see if I really enjoyed it.

    But as for a little bit more about me, I'm 24, born and raised in Loudon, Tennessee, just a little bit out of Knoxville. I'm a photographer and avid hiker/outdoor enthusiast, spent most of my time outdoors in the Smoky Mountains. I'm in decent shape, and as of right now, I'll have all of my time to spend outdoors since I'm unemployed.

  11. #11
    Member northernalberta's Avatar
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    So, you're not in Anchorage at this moment? When do you plan to get up here?

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    I'll be back in Anchorage by the end of next month. I just bought my plane ticket today actually.

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    Hmmm... Everything said so far... And.
    Take that camera and hiking ability, and hit some places. Think the whole time that you are doing it, if I get something.. I'll have to haul a lot more than this camera back with me! Good chance that you won't qualify for a resident tag. So right off the bat it would be a little pricey. Figure out if you are going to stay first. (One winter at minimum) Go out exploring as knowing how to just survive up here is highly recommended before heading into the frontier to take on wild game. As we fondly say up here... Off the Bus and Into the Foodchain!

  14. #14
    Member northernalberta's Avatar
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    That reminds me of a question I've had... can someone bring along a companion, who isn't officially "hunting"? They wouldn't have their own hunting licence, they wouldn't be shooting anything, they wouldn't be filling a bag limit. Just tagging along for safety. I assume so, right?

  15. #15
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Companion

    Northernalberta - I think you are correct but the ADF&G is the place to make sure. I know your companion wouldn't be able to carry a gun - so - if brown bears are a problem - I think the companion should stay close.

    Carlsdrivein - The regs are VERY clear on resident licenses. You have to physically live in Alaska for 365 days prior to getting a resident hunting/fishing license. Before that you must buy (a much more expensive) non-resident license.

    Whoever said hunting in Alaska is about money - is VERY correct. I'm constantly amazed at the guys (and gals) who talk about driving their rigs up the haul road for a weekend of "cheap" hunting. The expenses of driving hundreds of miles is unbelievable. And, in Alska, if you haven't driven hundreds of miles, your truck isn't even warmed up yet.
    Last edited by Phil; 07-29-2011 at 07:41. Reason: wrong name

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