Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Stalking Bull moose?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default Stalking Bull moose?

    With all the methods of hunting stalking moose in heavy brush is the most frustrating for me. Part of the problem is the antler restriction and having a bull appears out of no ware under 100 feet or walks right by me. Giving me only seconds to determent if hes legal before it disappears. I consider dressing up like a tree if I thought it would help.

    One time I was calling and had a bull respond and from a different direction a cow came in and was more interested in me than the bull; she came over to me and would not leave. I would love to know how a person can hide with a cow 20 feet away.

    If you stalk moose in heavy brush how do you keep from being seen?

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
    Posts
    1,494

    Default

    Hands and knees....

  3. #3
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,279

    Default

    Being a bowhunter of moose, I SEEK heavy cover. BUT, I need an open area like one of those sporadic clearings that you find here and there, and I like it no wider than 50 yards or so. Once the bull breaks into the open area, it's too late for him if he gives me a broadside shot. I arrange that shot with a Montana decoy. They see the decoy and are put at ease.

    Welcome the cow. She's an olfactory as well as sight decoy. Allow her to stay as long as she will, but it's usually a telling sign that there is no bull in the immediate area if she shows up alone and you're unable to draw a bull in to her.

    Here's a cow I called to one of those openings. The next morning I shot a nice bull here.

    Have a good season, bud!

    Taylor
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,121

    Default

    Still hunt the area very slowly paying attention to the wind.
    Almost impossible to thread an arrow through a nice thick alder patch!

    Marc,
    Lets here a little more about the Montana decoy set-up. Are you positioning the decoy and calling to see what comes in or stalking with it like an antelope decoy that one would hide behind?
    BK

  5. #5
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,279

    Default

    I'll flash it if I can see the bull and he needs pulling, but otherwise I use it in a static setup.

    Taylor

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
    Posts
    1,494

    Default

    Mark- do you sell the decoys there at your store? I think I might play around with a couple this year at my moose camp. Very open country where I am, get busted more then I connect some years....

  7. #7
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,279

    Default

    I ran them for a couple years, yes. Interest waned so I sold them out. If we can stir up an interest again I'd be happy to get them in again.

    I last ran them for $115, which is less than retail, but shipping them killed any money I could make to justify handling them full time.

    Taylor

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
    Posts
    1,494

    Default

    I'll come in and order a couple from ya soon!

  9. #9
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,121

    Default

    I'm interested too Marc.
    BK

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Girdwood
    Posts
    1,123

    Default

    No crawling or hiding for me. I just try to mimic another moose....walk a few steps at a time....snap twigs and grasses like I'm browsing...plus it gives me something to do.

    For some reason, when one has the predator mind set or makes chase like they are a target for the table ... they quickly catch on and recognize your aggressive actions. Another tactic is I try is to be an accidental tourist ... move in slowly for identification like you're on their time schedule and just awkwardly positioning for their picture... or even try to back out as they can become curious and will even follow. One friend had one follow him a 1/4 mile or more as he went back to camp to exchange his 22 rifle for his moose gun.

  11. #11

    Default

    I think a lot of it depends on the moose and area you are hunting. Some moose are just spookier then others. One day they might stand and look at you and the next day they run away. So much of it depends on the time of the year and the rut. I try to find a water hole that has lots of tracks into it. They can show up any time of day. Mornings before they lay up and evening when they start moving are usually prime times, but we have shot a few at mid day. In 46 years of hunting moose I have only shot one on opening day and never have got one at day break, go figure. I like walking trails in the morning. I keep the wind in my favor as much as possible. I usually have a caribou scapula that I lightly scrape on willow bushes and once in a while I pull on some leaves. I always assume they hear me unless I am perfectly still at a water hole. I just try to walk like a feeding moose, take a few steps, pull on a few leaves, etc. Patience, got to have it. I think some look at thick timber and after a few days believe there isn't a moose in the area. I look at thick timber and know one is there and if I don't see it I know it might step into view at any moment. I can do this day after day and not loose heart. I have shot a bunch of moose and hunted 15 solid days once before pulling the trigger and I have come home empty handed. I will get him next time. These were not "trophy" sized moose but they sure ate good and gave me a happy heart. Good hunting to you.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    712

    Default

    You either gotta be still and silent save for calling, or barge in like you own the place. Different situations call for different tactics. If you put a bull to rest in a brush choked area and can't call him out, you can barge in from downwind like you own the place. Sling your rifle, carry two large sticks/logs and thrash brush as you walk in on him and his ladies. Thrash brush and trees as you walk to cover the swishing of your clothes on brush (my breathable waders are a bit noisy). Then drop one log, continue thrashing with the other, and plug your nose to grunt every few steps for a while like they do. I got within 30 yards of this year's bull this way. I stopped charging ahead when I saw his cow's ears, and from there just jockeyed for a shot. He wanted to get a better look at me, stepped out in the clear, and I shot. I was screened by brush. This was in above-treeline willow brush where they stand a touch taller than the brush but I don't. I wouldn't do it in forest.

  13. #13
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    I like to fine a shooter moose at a little range.I then circle around to a good spot and grunt a few times and let the moose come stalk me.Spike fork fifty is so much more enjoyable now than tier II were the hunt can be over in four hours
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •