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Thread: 3/4 Tongue and groove ply not 48in???

  1. #1
    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
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    Default 3/4 Tongue and groove ply not 48in???

    Anybody play with any tongue/groove ply lately?. We built nice 16x28 floor 24in, centers, and started laying out the ply by the secound sheet were coming up short on the joist.. Thought never came to me that the ply once slipped into the groove you loose 3/8,s of in..each sheet, time i would have got to other end wow!!So they make the plywood at 48in. then cut the groove and the slot, now.. I remember we used just cut that last bit off on end sheet, Not Anymore! Been a while since i have layed any tongue and groove But never had seen this before.Man was i pissed. So FYI, hint there, ck it before leave the store.I would have been better off with just regular sheets,
    I did make it work , we ended up turning the other way and left us short where the wall sits.You would never know now but still??

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    sounds like you were running it the wrong way, which could cause sag in the longrun anyway. sheeting is designed to be run against the joists not with them, its much stronger this way and the grain is lined up for this. If your joists are running from east to west, the long side of your sheeting should be running north to south. Yes, tounge and grove stuff is not 48 inches wide without the tongue, it never has been to my knowledge. however it is a full 8 feet long, which means when installed the way it was designed to be used, there is no issue. You can special order 4x8 that is cross grained (atleast thats what they call it here) that is a fill 48 inches + the tongue, but it cost around 2x what nornal sheeting does because it is only used for special circumstances that are not common.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bklausman View Post
    . however it is a full 8 feet long, which means when installed the way it was designed to be used, there is no issue.
    Not quite true. This same thing bit me when I was building our cabin. I oriented them correctly on the joists but came up short along the side of the far wall because I was expecting them to be a full 4' wide. Like Susitna, I was able to make it work but I was also a bit peeved about it.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Let me guess, you bought it at Home Depot or Lowes. Both of them sell 3/4 OSB and Plywood TNG that is called "scant face" in the industry. It happens to be a little cheaper, so that's what they sell. Scant face is an industry standard, as is "full face". When I order truck loads of TNG plywood I have to specify what I want. BTW, myself and SBS only sell "full face" which is 48" wide on the surface.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
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    I was hoping Doug would jump in and explain, Who knew, scant face/ full face. Now i know the rest of the story.. Live and learn..
    Thanks Doug..

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    So what do they call the scant sticks they sell that are 2x6s that aren't even 5 1/2. I have seen them little as 5 1/8 I hate odd size lumber.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I can't tell you anything on that one, other than the fact that when you store a stick of wood inside a big box store they dry out way more than even when they are used in construction. Those studs, once exosed again to summer weather will probably jump out to 5 3/8" once they are in a wall. They will then vary with outside humidity in a framed wall since they should be on the outside of the vapor barrier. I once framed a house with studs that were just fine at 5 1/2" in the summer, by the time winter hit and I began sheetrocking they were down to 5 1/8". I just tore into that building to help replace a window and all the studs were back to just a tiny bit under 5 1/2". I quit building stairs out of 2x12's due to wood movement. My last set shrunk from 11 1/2" to 10 3/4" in the winter and back out again to 11 1/4" in the summer if it was wet and rainy out. Now I build them exclusively out of 1 3/4" LVLs for stringer and 1 1/8 plywood for the steps. Wood moves, it's as simple as that.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Another funny example of wood shrinkage is when I demo'd a section of my house to remodel. The 2x10's I used for floor joists had shrunk so bad that not a single one of them was sitting in the just hanger anymore. On average they had shrunk 1/2" off the bottom of the hanger The only thing holding them up was the 4 nails in the sides of the hanger and the glue/mails holding them to the underside of the plywood above. That floor didn't squeek a bit. Since it was summer, the most humidity of the year, I moved all the hangers up tight to the joists and ended up firring out the ceiling flat.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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