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Thread: How do you increAse the number of reds you land?

  1. #1
    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
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    Default How do you increAse the number of reds you land?

    I know this has been discussed a little, but while I fished the Kenai yesterday I only landed 3 all day while I probably hooked up to 15? I've tried switching hooks between rr flys then went with gamakatsu hooks and yarn and even tried the eagle claw lazor sharps. All seemed to loosefish. I keep my rod tip low to the water and keep a good bend on my pole. Most of the ones I lost were popping off while I had plenty of tension on my line. Any body have any tips or advice? There always seems to be a group of people that land almost every fish they hook. That's definitely not me.

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    Member power drifter's Avatar
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    I bet some of them where foul hooked and they are harder to land. Hold your rod tip up, not low to the water.

  3. #3

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    Im in the same boat as you.

    I know I hook most in the mouth because they jump out and I see the yarn color right on their face!
    I only land about 25% of the ones I have on. But most are only on for a few seconds.

    Most of the ones I lose are at the end of my drift when I dont have the 'room' or enough tension to set the hook properly.

    There are definitely people who are better at it than I am but Im not sure what to work on in order to improve.
    Random guy in Fly shop: "Where did this happen???? In real life or in Alaska?"

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    Member Theone2's Avatar
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    Power Drifter is right. Hold your tip up, not flat. And get enough weight so you can feel it bounce on the bottom. I cast at about 12:00 and then let it drift and when the line stops I give a little tug. Remember you are trying to do whatever you can to get that fly in the red's mouth. Everyone has different of techniques.
    "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing it is not fish they are after."
    -Henry David Thoreau

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    That's just part of fishing, last time I fished the kenai I landed the first fish I landed was 45 I think. Water was high and strong current, pull them close to shore and keep the rod up. It doesn't help to let them run.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I use a gillnet

    but seriously folks, I think the biggest mistake when landing reds is the (sometimes unavoidable) act of trying to horse them in, you gotta let them run if they want to run no matter how heavy your line is. Take your time, follow the fish (people will get out of the way a lot of the time) and you'll land more.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  7. #7

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    I fish primarily the lower Kenai. I don't have a problem landing. Usually though in "landing", it is into a net. For visualization I fish where the water is flowing from right to left. I direct the netter downstream and in shallower water just off to my left maybe ten feet. I'll have my rod bent to the right and slightly up river. When I am ready with the fish I will switch from a bent rod right to a bent rod left (toward the netter and the shore). This allows the fish to turn his head toward the net right at the scoop spot. The fish usually sees you getting pulled out of the deeper water into the shallow but it is too late the net is there. You could do the same and land the fish that way depending on where you are fishing.

    I play the fish a little bit, sometimes it makes one run sometimes two, after which it is usually tuckered. I never have the netter chase the fish but control it to the net.

    I use a 9 wt Redfield fly rod with 25 # leader and Gamakatsu hooks (don't recall the #). The hook size in the upper will definitely set you back. I use sinking fly line, nail knot to mono, sliding weights above a swivel and about a five foot leader. I tie my own egg loops with yarn. I lost one hook and zero setups with about 20 fish landed. This is the best year that I have seen for reds (in my 4 years!)

    Great season, time to go back to work, hope that helps.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    I use a gillnet

    but seriously folks, I think the biggest mistake when landing reds is the (sometimes unavoidable) act of trying to horse them in, you gotta let them run if they want to run no matter how heavy your line is. Take your time, follow the fish (people will get out of the way a lot of the time) and you'll land more.
    couldn't be more true. I can't tell you how many people do that. don't let the fish rest. if it stops or slows start reeling and getting toward the bank but when it decides to run you have to let it go. Keep pressure on it but do not try to stop them. The more they run the faster they get tired. Limited out in 2 hours today and landed 7 out of 9 fish (one pink that i released) I fished alone, no net, and a 7wt fly rod. Its easier then you think. just give them time, wear them out and bash them on the head!
    Tight lines!!!

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    Member Salmon-Thirty-Salmon's Avatar
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    I see most of the lost fish on fair hook-ups due to horsing to hard. This would include me if I'm trying to stay out of others way...but if I can let them run a bit if they give the tug - good deal. I will say I am a rod tip low guy. My humble opinion is tip up brings the fish up and out of the water... Floppy fish can lead to slack and loss of control and thus come off easier. Also I notice there is a tendency when a fish comes out of the water to point the rod toward the fish which reduces your rod angle and increases losing fish chances. A good hook set and just a steady low or slight up rod tip with a good angle (nice amount of rod bend) and the fish will just sit in front of you or try and push up stream..not always but on average. My best lands/controls are fish that never break the water all the way to the bank. It may not be a spectacular fight which is always fun, but it get the task done which is to fillet and release. My favorite, however, is the folks that Flip, Hook, hold rod as far over head, turn around, march to shore as expeditiously as possible, land fish. No reeling, no foolin'. Whatever works best for you - you'll find a technique that satisfies your style.

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    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
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    Thanks guys these are good. I've tried a few different tricks and the best so far is low rod tip pointing down stream the same way you set the hook. I know lots of my problems this year were due to my reel having a stripped gear so I couldn't reel traditionally I'd have to pull up and speed reel in the slack otherwise it would sound like my reel was fixin to explode and I wouldn't gain any line. I saw and spoke with a guy on the klutina a few weeks back that came down beside me landed his 3 in an hour and was done that told me keep it low as you can set the hook 3 times and don't horse it in. This definitely helped me until I made it to deeper water with very little bank to land a fish on. Thankfully while on the Kenai there was people kind enough to net my 2 otherwise I might not have got them. Unfortunately changing my reel has probablly come too late for any more reds this year I doubt I'll make it back down. Feel free to keep the techniques coming I definitely appreciate any wisdom from others.

  11. #11
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Rod tip low to the water... reel at shoulder to eye level... deep heavy bend in the rod. You are in control... act like it! Pull as hard as you can. Lead the fish... don't let him lead you. You WILL land at least two out of three with this method, even without a net.The 'keep your tip up' crowd will lose LOTS more fish... take it to the bank.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    The KeenEye MD

  12. #12

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    First, set the hook. A lot of fishers seem to think that just because the fish is running out line that it is hooked up. I have seen this basic mistake every day on the rivers and lakes that I fish. For me the down and dirty method of using the fly rod works the best of playing the fish to landing. If the fish runs down stream point the rod low down stream to the fish and pull hard towards the shore. If the fish runs up stream point the rod up river and pull hard to the shore and don't let the fish rest. Try this next time you fish and it should increase your catch rate. Tight lines.
    Only those that can see the invisible can do the impossible.

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