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Thread: Transporting a Grumman

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    Member Lvnthdrm's Avatar
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    Default Transporting a Grumman

    Have been reading with fascination about all you guys and your Grumman's for several years and now I am the proud owner of a 71 model with a 9.8 merc. Now I need to transport it and wondering about different ways to do so. Any suggestions or hard learned lessons?

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    For years, I hauled my 19'er on a Yakima rack on my pickup. About 5 years ago, I bought a commercially made canoe trailer, for $700. Still use the Yakima rack to haul my paddle canoe, but the trailer is great for the 19'er. I've since lengthened the tongue on the trailer from 17' to 20' long to adapt it to haul my 21' Scott Hudson Bay. A modest canoe trailer makes the Grumman easier to deal with by yourself. Just my opinion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lvnthdrm View Post
    Have been reading with fascination about all you guys and your Grumman's for several years and now I am the proud owner of a 71 model with a 9.8 merc. Now I need to transport it and wondering about different ways to do so. Any suggestions or hard learned lessons?
    Just toss it (them?) on top. When you run out of space across, start stacking. This is three in a pyramid stack. Not the easiest to get up there, but you do what you got to do sometimes. It actually worked a lot better than we had expected.
    canoes on truck.jpg

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    I'm with Rick, I have used my truck rack for my Grumman but my trailer is a whole lot better and easier to use. I don't need to empty the canoe or pull the motor (9.9 Merc or 3.3 Merc) fuel or anything....just float her on, strap her down and drive away. I have a trailer for a 18' boat and it works fine for the Grumman and my Esquif Cargo with a couple boards and straps. The 16' Penobscott still goes on the truck rack.

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lvnthdrm View Post
    Have been reading with fascination about all you guys and your Grumman's for several years and now I am the proud owner of a 71 model with a 9.8 merc. Now I need to transport it and wondering about different ways to do so. Any suggestions or hard learned lessons?
    Did you go with a 2 or 4 stroke?
    Semper Fi and God Bless

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    Member Lvnthdrm's Avatar
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    In answer to the 2 or 4 stroke question--canoe came with an older 2 stroke. Gentleman I bought from said that he bought the motor and canoe at the same time. Runs great now that I have done a little work on it and seems to have plenty of power. I know that I have a lot to learn about running this rig but I think it is going to be great learning. Thanks for all the input on the transport question. I am going to modify a trailer I already have to carry it.

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    have moved the 19'er all over the state on top of vehicles with roof racks, even used an old ford escort a couple of times and a toyota carolla. vision was slightly compromised but not too bad and the fuel bill wasn't too bad either.

    trailer certainly makes things easier (we've never upgraded to one) but go with whatever works for you.

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    The one thing I don't like about trailers is that it is just more mechanical thing that can have problems. Just another two tires that can have flats. More bearings to wear out. More potential hitch problems. You name it. Putting it on the roof just eliminates all those extra potential issues.

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    anchskier why do you still load with the lifts on the canoe? when I load the canoe the lift gets in the way, so what I do is pull the lift, it takes 3 clips, 2 pins, one rod, it comes off the canoe in a short time for me,

    SID

  10. #10

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    I load with the lift on.. I have a little toyota PU and I just slide it forward up to the lift and it balances just about right. I can even load it by myself even though I'm an old fat guy...not that it's easy.

    I have a trailer but I would rather use a car top for the same reasons mentioned above. Trailers are just another potential problem, especially on long trips on bad roads like to Eagle or Circle or Manley.
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    when the canoe is up side down an on the lift an the handle isi draging in the sand/mud/dirt an canoe is tippie an the hande digs in an go back to pick it up to slide, an yes I am old an FAT but stilldoing it some I need all the help it is getting so I have a problem getting the front end up on the truck / car [to high to can't lift it ] like I used to ,

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    Sid,

    I'm old, fat, had rotator cuff surgery in April and not in the mood to lift heavy stuff up high either.

    My truck (4x4,4 door Super Duty) rack is way too high for me to reach by myself so what I have been doing is using a tail gate extender that fits into my trailer hitch to get the front of the canoe up to waist height when I'm standing on the tailgate then I can lift it up to the rack much easier. I also use my canoe cart wheels on the bottom to make it easier to move and keep the bottom from getting scratched up any worse that it is already.

    Once the bow is on the rack and the stern is in the dirt I get off the tailgate, remove the wheels and push most of the boat onto the rack from the ground and then back on the tailgate to finish the job. The bar that runs from the hitch to the extender is also a great intermediate step between the ground and the tailgate. I slide it onto the rack on it's bottom and then flip it over once I get it onto the rack. That keeps things from catching on the ground or the rack and then just strap it down. I think that may help with your lift dragging in the dirt too.

    Yes, it is a pain in the butt which is why I use the trailer 90% of the time. Trailer is 20 or so years old with pressure treated bunks and once in the Spring I grease the bearings and I always rinse it off when I have it in the salt water. Other than having to replace the safety chains a few years back and tires last year it has been bullet proof.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sid View Post
    anchskier why do you still load with the lifts on the canoe? when I load the canoe the lift gets in the way, so what I do is pull the lift, it takes 3 clips, 2 pins, one rod, it comes off the canoe in a short time for me,

    SID
    A couple of reasons.

    First, the pins are fairly old and are a pain in the butt to get out, much less get back in with the cotter key holes lined up. Also, taking the lift off means you have to find a place to pack it in the truck which can be an issue when you pack WAY too much stuff to start with and don't have the room.

    My family is fairly short all around, so the lift on the back actually helps me to be able to push the stern of the canoe up and get some leverage to move it onto and off the rack.

    The biggest reason to leave them on is that they aren't in the way the way we carry them. They extend behind where we would want the boat resting on the racks anyway. Taking them off would only serve to make it take longer to get ready once we get to where we are going.

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