Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: Moving to Alaska

  1. #1

    Wink Moving to Alaska

    I am moving to Alaska soon and I love to Hunt . I am from the lower 48 and have hunted Whitetail, Muley, Elk, ect. How hard is it to get connected and Hunt Caribou, Moose I will be living aound Kenai/Soldotna area. What area is best for hunting Caribou,Moose, maybe deer and elk in Alaska . Is hunting good around Kenai/Soldotna ? Is the hunting easy to get involved in in this area. I am from an area where you lease land to hunt and game is plentiful . I lived in Montana for a few years and game there was plentiful also with lots of national forest land available to hunt . Resident license would get you a few deer, antelope, and elk but you had to draw for moose, sheep, ect ...Thanks for any info on Alaska Hunting ...........Ed

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Ed

    The hunting on the KP is tough. The moose population is down and hard to find a legal bull. You need to draw a tag to hunt caribou. I'm not sure how hard it is to draw one but I think its fairly tough. Then I think that hunt is very demanding. The hunting up here is way different. You just have to hunt longer, further and harder. The game densities aren't anywhere near what Montana is. Your best bet is hunt what you can and save some money and fly out somewhere. You will find it takes a lot more money to hunt up here.

  3. #3
    Member roughneck6883's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    188

    Default

    I moved from MT as well and AK is a whole different ball game. I live in Fairbanks and the main problem there is access you have to have time to walk in and put some miles on your boots and you might have to take a plane of a ferry to get to a hunting destination....don't get me wrong hunting in Alaska has no equal in my eye but its a little more expensive than in Montana and better in so many other ways.
    When you get your residence deer are on Kodiak, the Prince William Sound, and SE AK .If you look up old threads you will find more info there, I will continue to take the drive up the Dalton hwy for Caribou and would recommend taking the bow up there, its an awsome time. Look up old threads on the topic for advice people on here have been very helpful to others and you can get most of the advice they can give by searching old threads. As for moose they are around....finding a legal one is rough though and everybody is looking for one so your gonna have to scout for them.
    I hope this helps when you do make your way up here stay safe and good luck!!
    "Horns make pi$* poor soup"

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks Kodiak Kid, So I would be better off to hunt other areas in Alaska? Do you have to draw for everything? Caribou, Elk, Deer , Moose? If not what are there any areas you can just buy a license / tags and go hunting ? I already know it is not going to be near as convienant to hunt as far as getting tags and finding game without having to go far , but i am hoping it will be possible to hunt without having to be able to run the triathalon or something. I am just the normal joe that loves to hunt and have hunted all my life who has an opportunity to move to Alaska and rather than turn into a fisherman am hoping to find somewhere up there where you can hunt I dont mind taking a week or flying into somewhere to hunt but I aint rich and cant afford those expensive guided hunts. I fill my freezer every year with venison and would love to continue to fill it with wild game if possible..Ed

  5. #5

    Default

    Thanks for the reply Roughneck6883, I hope to move between now and march so this season is out for me . A deer or caribou would do me just fine !! Moose is a big critter would be more than I would need in the freezer I think. I could have taken alot of bear in the Carolina's when I lived there but they dont eat good unless you have the knack of knowing how to clean them and get all the musk glands out so I never hunted them. Anyhow thanks again for the info and I will be posting more after I get set up and also searching older threads.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    579

    Default

    Where are you located now? Going by your name, maybe Mississippi? Hunt up here is good but it is also becoming a rich man sport. The prices seem to go up every year. Still a great place to live and hunt.

  7. #7

    Default

    You would be right there I am in Mississippi now

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    113

    Default

    I grew up in NW MT and I don't find it that much different, anywhere that is easily accessible is over hunted. You have to be willing to put in the miles and the work to get to where the people aren't, then you can start looking for animals. It seems that if you don't own a boat or an airplane, you should save your money for a flight every year. Either that or hunt the walk-in area's. It kind of reminds me of hunting the Bob Marshall, once you get deep enough in the animals are plentiful and the people are scarce. Bottom line is, unless your willing to work/pay to get away from people your chances are slim for a lot of the game.
    Quote Originally Posted by roughneck6883 View Post
    I moved from MT as well and AK is a whole different ball game. I live in Fairbanks and the main problem there is access you have to have time to walk in and put some miles on your boots and you might have to take a plane of a ferry to get to a hunting destination....don't get me wrong hunting in Alaska has no equal in my eye but its a little more expensive than in Montana and better in so many other ways.
    When you get your residence deer are on Kodiak, the Prince William Sound, and SE AK .If you look up old threads you will find more info there, I will continue to take the drive up the Dalton hwy for Caribou and would recommend taking the bow up there, its an awsome time. Look up old threads on the topic for advice people on here have been very helpful to others and you can get most of the advice they can give by searching old threads. As for moose they are around....finding a legal one is rough though and everybody is looking for one so your gonna have to scout for them.
    I hope this helps when you do make your way up here stay safe and good luck!!

  9. #9
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default

    You might try taking some time and read this http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...gulations.main it will answer alot of your question and cause many. Alaska reqs are one of the more challenging to understand in the begining and can be a pain in the butt. Congrats on the move.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Eagle River<AK
    Posts
    285

    Default

    I have hunted in AK since the mid 60's and things have really changed. Essentially all of the caribou hunting near a road system (except the haul road) have gone to a draw. A few bad winters and LOTS of predators have moved many sheep hunts to a draw. The same problems have hit the moose, although numbers seem to be picking up again. Legal sheep need to be full curl (about 9 years old). Moose in most parts of the state must be either a spike/fork or smaller or else have a spread over 50 inches (or 3-4 brow tines); this means that since the majority of yearlings have a paddle that, in general, moose can't be hunted until they are several years old. Deer can be plentiful, especially on Kodiak, or in Prince William sound, but both require either a plane ride or a long ocean boat ride as there are no deer n the main land except in SE AK.

    Populations are FAR less dense than in the lower '48; this is why you will find a lot of closed mouths about where one hunts. After saying all of this, in general, I have been able to exist primarily on wild game over the years. Salmon are plentiful on the Kenai. You will find that unlike hunting in the lower '48, where one can often hunt right out the back door, most hunts become an expedition with quite a bit of planning and some type of transportation coming into play. Take a look at maps which show the highways in the state and you will find that much of the stae is not near them; this doesn't mean that folks aren't hunting far from them, though, as many use aircraft, boats, or 4-wheelers to travel for hunting and even place far from roads may be pretty well utilized.

  11. #11

    Default

    Hunting in Alaska is very expensive. Just the most basic equipment, good back pack roughly $500.00 good binoculars roughly $1,000.00 good spotting scope roughly $1,200.00 Good basic cook and camp kit for alpine $800.00 to $2,000.++

    Most or at least half of the hunting "Days" are in weather that would meet the standards for vile and if not it is cold, wet, foggy, and miserable. Yes, you can learn to enjoy being miserable, but even so it is still miserable.

    Alaska now has way to many hunters, and way too sparse game populations. This results in a lot of guess/and hope shots at sub legal game which gets covered with brush and rocks, but sadly never fully matures to trophy or legal size.

    But, it will only get worse from here.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,956

    Default

    I discovered one thing about hunting up here and that is that access is difficult. You talk about deer well there are no deer down by Kenai/Soldotna. Deer are mainly out on the islands in Prince William Sound or in the southeast part of Alaska. The closest caribou herd is indeed a draw (DC001) and although they give a good number of permits out, it is not easy access. A friend had the permit and walked in 16 miles before even seeing signs of caribou. People have a vision of Alaska that there's game behind every tree and you can just go out a bag yourself a caribou or moose in the afternoon. Not true in the present times. When I was stationed in Utah the access and game was much easier to get to and a lot cheaper to hunt. If you can drive there, then so can everyone else and it gets crowded with little game. The above posters are giving good advise. I do fly outs and save over the year to go and usually its for caribou since a moose is too darn heavy. Don't get me wrong, hunting here is great for the different species and oppurtunities but don't expect it to be like Montana or anywhere else in the lower 48. Good luck on your move.

  13. #13

    Default

    Thanks to all for the honest answers about Hunting Alaska . It appears that it wont be that easy to get started !! Hopefully I can make a friend or two that have been in the area a while and hunt and can show me the ropes or help me so that all my lessons aren't expensive. Thanks again ..Ed

  14. #14
    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Woodland, Washington
    Posts
    866

    Default

    I moved to Anchorage in May of 2010 from Oregon where I was an avid archery elk and deer hunter. I had grand expectations that I'd be out hunting all the time for all kinds of game. After getting up here and learning the reality of it, my expectations were shattered.

    Hunting up here is hard, very hard. It requires a lot of work and a lot of travelling. Things are far apart up here and with few roads, the hunting pressure is immense. Everyone wants a moose and from the road system, there is a lot of pressure. The best hunting is typically by fly-out or float. But most good float hunts require a fly-out so go figure. Everyone has a quad and I don't think you can reasonably get away from people on quads.

    Fly-outs aren't cheap either, you're looking at shelling out a couple grand easy for a flight out somewhere to hunt. Caribou is probably the easiest to do. Go up the Haul road and hunt off the road or fly-out and hunt or maybe the 40-mile herd fly-out? But I wouldn't waste my time and effort hunting moose on the KP. There really isn't much for hunting down there except black bears, in my opinion.

    Good luck!

    Oh and by the way, after being here just a few months. I packed up my truck and drove the 800 some odd miles up north to the Haul Road and was succesful on a caribou with my bow. So there are things you can do and have fun with right off the bat.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    the Break Away Republic of Eagle River
    Posts
    513

    Default

    why you are moving up here? For a job, or to hunt? Either way you best prepare yourself for some cold dark winter nights ahead and you best get up here before aug 9 so you can start your year long sentence before you can get a resident tag. Thats 365 days before the eve of the next hunting season.

  16. #16

    Default

    Moving for a Job. Thanks again for all the info it has been an eye opener !! It almost sounds like it would be cheaper to fly back to Montana or Mississippi and Hunt for 2 weeks each year .

  17. #17

    Default

    Can you gun hunt off this Haul road? Is it hard to hunt there? Are there places to stay around there are do you have to camp, ect? Thanks for the Info....Ed

  18. #18
    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Woodland, Washington
    Posts
    866

    Default

    There's a ton of reading over in the bow forum about it. But it's archery only for 5 miles on either side of the road. It is difficult walking on the tundra but it's pretty flat to rolling hills. It is a difficult hunt but very fun. There's no where to stay up there and yes you must camp along the road where ever you can.

  19. #19

    Default

    I have lived in the Kenai area for over 30 years. Moose hunting is probably approaching an all time low. Much of the land is "moose range" and vehicle use is prohibited and the state prohibits vehicle use on accessible trails after Sept. 10th. All in all not a very good moose area unless your one of the many bears that eat up way over half of the moose calves every year. Caribou, goat and brown bear are limited to a few permits. A very few sheep hunters get lucky after what is usually a tough hunt. Lots of moose calf eating black bears live on the Kenai. If I was young and tough I would hunt the Books or Alaska Range and live in it's proximity. There are lots of hunters in the Kenai-Soldotna area and I think you will be disappointed if you move here to hunt. Go North.

  20. #20

    Default

    Thanks .338 mag . I am not moving there to hunt but for a Job . My family plans to live and work around Anchorage / Palmer area but my work would be around Soldotna / Kenai area. Home will be where the family is and I will be staying locally and going home on off days. How is the hunting around Wasilla/Palmer/Anchorage areas ? is it as Doom and Gloom as the Kenai/Soldotna area? I surely hope not . I am glad for the honest replies because this was not at all what I expected the hunting would be like. I was sure it was going to be a little more expensive but thought as a resident it would not be hard to make friends with some of the locals and find some spots to hunt. I am not in any kinda shape to walk 16 miles into anyplace . I have a 4 wheeler and can walk some but open heart surgery a few years back has made it impossible for me to run the triatholon !! The only hobby I have is hunting besides my work . My family wants to move there even more than me but to be honest it would suck if I couldnt hunt . What would you guess it cost to fly into a place and hunt for a week for caribou and moose ect? Including lodging, transportation ect. $ 5000 ?? Just wondering i spend an average of about $2500 each year on Hunting leases,Club Dues, Licenses, ect ect.. Thanks .Ed

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •