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Thread: Kind of quiet with the pre - sheep hunt discussion.

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    Default Kind of quiet with the pre - sheep hunt discussion.

    Been looking forward to some pre - sheep hunt discussion on getting in shape, tactics, equipment, etc.. Is everyone ready and keeping things secret or is it just a little muted this year? I'm 3000 miles away so I need to read this stuff!

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Sorry to dissapoint...I've been out of breath from all the training/climbing/scouting that I'm doing!

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    Been hiking, biking and squattin. Also been having a fun, busy summer. Went on a nice 10 mile hike today with my hunting parter, our wives and his daughters. Got a new bag this year. Moved to down. Got a few gear tweaks to do, some more shooting, continue with training hikes with heavy load. Headed out on the 8th weather permitting.

  4. #4

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    Haven't done crap! Rode the bike a couple of times! Been wrestling with building a shack. Am I ready to sheep hunt?? HELL YEAH! Might be painful, but a little pain won't stop the hunt!

  5. #5

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    People have told me that I should keep real beta on a need to know basis. However, I think that we will see an increase in harvests and some real hawgs taken this year both in trophy(read drawing permit) areas and in other areas around the state. I also see that there is a kind of general lack of guidance to starter hunters. It was better in the old days when Sheep days really meant something.

    I do think that its time to remind people that there are several things that help:

    1) Get obsessed. The more obsessed you are with sheep hunting the more you are going to find kindred spirits and people who can give you advice. Don't go suicidal if you don't have a 3000 spotter. Take what you have and understand that finding the time and the opportunity to go sheep hunting is worth that 15000 to 30000 dollars that non-residents pay.

    2) Your boots should be broken in right now or you will pay in blood. It doesn't matter if you have cheap rocky boots or van gorkums you have to understand that good boots are the most important element of a satisfying experience.

    3) 1.5 hours- Can you hike up and downs for 1.5 hours sustained without breaks with your sheep gear. If you can't, get working. Envision that big broomed buster ram bedded on a spire just 40 yards in front of you. Your other demands have to fall away just go for that image of that ram. You need to be going at least three times per week for 1.5 hour workouts. Packing with weights is best. Identify when you need to recover but don't get lazy... keep that big sheep in your mind.

    4) Test everything- I found the remains of a dead sheep hunter when I was scouting sheep once. He had been missing for more than a decade. His rifle blew up with overly hot reloads and he tumbled down a shale slide. I bagged his remains and what was left of his gear and hauled them to the troopers. Your rifle, your ammo, your tent, your sleeping bag, your bivy, your stove, your optics and your clothing all should be tested. Never test your gear for the first time on a sheep hunt. Also think of things that can be redundant. Think of how you would deal with different problems but don't get obsessed about Larry Kanuit's Alaska Bear Tales. Just know what to do and remind your partner that you will do everything to make sure that you get back. The sheep hunt is our last connection with the time before and without it we are wussies.

    5) Re-read Tony Russ's book. The pictures and the advice should be motivational material. make a slide show of big sheep pictures and figure out how close you can get on guessing how big sheep horns are and what sublegal rams are per state of Alaska definitions. I noticed that there are four legal rams on the state's website but there isn't one sheep that was blue-ticketed. Make sure you know what a legal sheep is. Don't worry if you only encounter sublegal sheep and don't take one home. I can tell you, you will get your chance and its better to be straight and legal then bend and try to make a sheep legal. The true victory of sheep hunting is going sheep hunting and getting into the country. Sheep ribs over a fire is pretty good too.

    6) Know where rams live. I have heard from many hunters that they didn't see a single ram and I ask them where they went from the strip and they tell me. The weather was tough so I spotted up the valley from my camp that was close to the strip. Rams live above where the ewes live. Get out and walk- However, don't pound on pots and pans in the middle of the valley walking up a drainage. Be sneaking and practice being sneaky. My guess is that is the quality that I notice more about those truly legendary sheep hunters that they are not only obsessed but they are plain sneaky. They glide and sneak.

    7) Your gear is your protection. Buy the best you can and be prepared for what may come. Good Tent, Good sleeping bag and good shell can keep you hunting for several years.

    8) Time or Money. People who have a lot of time can get into areas with less money and have a great chance at success. People with more money might have better gear or opportunity to get into better areas. You have to remember that guides spend considerable time and energy looking over their country to ensure client success. There are people who find a right little niche that gives them both. Those are the lucky ones.

    Presently, I have goats on the brain and when I go out for a run or load up the pack I imagine that monster billy staring back at me, sizing me up as goats are wont to do. I can tell you that my charter is paid for and I actually have partners for this trip so I am excited as I was when I was a kid.

    Every year you get to go sheep hunting is a success and every year that you don't get out in the mountains is worse than getting your wisdom teeth removed. Make sure that you get out there every single year because I have never heard a sheep hunter complaining that they hunted too much.

    Sincerely,
    Thomas
    Last edited by kaboku68; 07-23-2011 at 22:38. Reason: sp, beer

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    And speaking of sheep hunting related foilables... I slipped on a slimy rock chasing pinks at Allison Pt. and came down really hard on my knee. Icing it down and it hurts to the bone.

    If I deep-sixed my draw tag for sheep while I was out screwing around chasing stinking pinks I'm gonna go bananas. I've managed to keep my middle age body healthy through training- hoping for the best.

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    Thanks 68, fun to read that post

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    haven't done any scouting or hiking, broke a toe really well ( it's black & blue). got all my gear ready, have been shooting the bow every night out to 70 yards & from different hight /angles. taking my little cuz with me & we are both stoked to go. the first day will be ruff but my second ram & first with a bow is what will keep me going. Good luck to every one else & be safe.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    It has been a busy summer but most of my gear is together now. I replaced the bag, rain gear, tent and pad with all new lighter and hopefully better gear. I had almost three years worth of home repair backlog to catch up on so I just turned from clearing land and hauling wood type exercise to jogging the hills in crevasse moraine park and plan on doing several hikes in the mountains near town with the pack on over the last bit of time I have till I fly out on the 11th. For me the first couple days I have to gut out then I hit my groove and get stronger.

  10. #10
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Hoping to do a 2012 sheep hunt.... 2011 just isn't in the fold unfortunately.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  11. #11
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaboku68 View Post
    People have told me that I should keep real beta on a need to know basis. However, I think that we will see an increase in harvests and some real hawgs taken this year both in trophy(read drawing permit) areas and in other areas around the state. I also see that there is a kind of general lack of guidance to starter hunters. It was better in the old days when Sheep days really meant something.

    I do think that its time to remind people that there are several things that help:

    1) Get obsessed. The more obsessed you are with sheep hunting the more you are going to find kindred spirits and people who can give you advice. Don't go suicidal if you don't have a 3000 spotter. Take what you have and understand that finding the time and the opportunity to go sheep hunting is worth that 15000 to 30000 dollars that non-residents pay.

    2) Your boots should be broken in right now or you will pay in blood. It doesn't matter if you have cheap rocky boots or van gorkums you have to understand that good boots are the most important element of a satisfying experience.

    3) 1.5 hours- Can you hike up and downs for 1.5 hours sustained without breaks with your sheep gear. If you can't, get working. Envision that big broomed buster ram bedded on a spire just 40 yards in front of you. Your other demands have to fall away just go for that image of that ram. You need to be going at least three times per week for 1.5 hour workouts. Packing with weights is best. Identify when you need to recover but don't get lazy... keep that big sheep in your mind.

    4) Test everything- I found the remains of a dead sheep hunter when I was scouting sheep once. He had been missing for more than a decade. His rifle blew up with overly hot reloads and he tumbled down a shale slide. I bagged his remains and what was left of his gear and hauled them to the troopers. Your rifle, your ammo, your tent, your sleeping bag, your bivy, your stove, your optics and your clothing all should be tested. Never test your gear for the first time on a sheep hunt. Also think of things that can be redundant. Think of how you would deal with different problems but don't get obsessed about Larry Kanuit's Alaska Bear Tales. Just know what to do and remind your partner that you will do everything to make sure that you get back. The sheep hunt is our last connection with the time before and without it we are wussies.

    5) Re-read Tony Russ's book. The pictures and the advice should be motivational material. make a slide show of big sheep pictures and figure out how close you can get on guessing how big sheep horns are and what sublegal rams are per state of Alaska definitions. I noticed that there are four legal rams on the state's website but there isn't one sheep that was blue-ticketed. Make sure you know what a legal sheep is. Don't worry if you only encounter sublegal sheep and don't take one home. I can tell you, you will get your chance and its better to be straight and legal then bend and try to make a sheep legal. The true victory of sheep hunting is going sheep hunting and getting into the country. Sheep ribs over a fire is pretty good too.

    6) Know where rams live. I have heard from many hunters that they didn't see a single ram and I ask them where they went from the strip and they tell me. The weather was tough so I spotted up the valley from my camp that was close to the strip. Rams live above where the ewes live. Get out and walk- However, don't pound on pots and pans in the middle of the valley walking up a drainage. Be sneaking and practice being sneaky. My guess is that is the quality that I notice more about those truly legendary sheep hunters that they are not only obsessed but they are plain sneaky. They glide and sneak.

    7) Your gear is your protection. Buy the best you can and be prepared for what may come. Good Tent, Good sleeping bag and good shell can keep you hunting for several years.

    8) Time or Money. People who have a lot of time can get into areas with less money and have a great chance at success. People with more money might have better gear or opportunity to get into better areas. You have to remember that guides spend considerable time and energy looking over their country to ensure client success. There are people who find a right little niche that gives them both. Those are the lucky ones.

    Presently, I have goats on the brain and when I go out for a run or load up the pack I imagine that monster billy staring back at me, sizing me up as goats are wont to do. I can tell you that my charter is paid for and I actually have partners for this trip so I am excited as I was when I was a kid.

    Every year you get to go sheep hunting is a success and every year that you don't get out in the mountains is worse than getting your wisdom teeth removed. Make sure that you get out there every single year because I have never heard a sheep hunter complaining that they hunted too much.

    Sincerely,
    Thomas
    If you read one posting regarding sheep hunting <ever>, read the above one...

    Always amazed at the insights of Thomas and his incredible sheep knowledge, equaled only by his humility.

    Thomas, I also have goats on the mind....two tags, two states this year. Looking forward to pics and story from yours...
    Proud to be an American!

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullkurl View Post
    If you read one posting regarding sheep hunting <ever>, read the above one...

    Always amazed at the insights of Thomas and his incredible sheep knowledge, equaled only by his humility.

    Thomas, I also have goats on the mind....two tags, two states this year. Looking forward to pics and story from yours...
    +1 I can only hope to know half of the sheep knowledge Thomas has forgotten. Oh and Thomas I'd rep ya but I gotta "spread the love" for now it says.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    +1 I can only hope to know half of the sheep knowledge Thomas has forgotten. Oh and Thomas I'd rep ya but I gotta "spread the love" for now it says.
    +2

    Alaska Lanche, I like his comment on time. I know both of us have budgeted enough time to make something happen with our Delta tags. I'm well trained and ready to pound some mountains. I'm doing a 5 day Mt. Goat hunt prior. I've been doing some gear shakedown overnight high elevation backcountry stuff. My new Ruger 416 and loaner 25AI are dialed in with custom loads and practice. My gear has been proven. My mind has been twisted and racked in high elevation hypoxia.

    Good luck and best wishes to everyone else heading into the hills.

    Is it time yet?

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    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fullkurl View Post
    If you read one posting regarding sheep hunting <ever>, read the above one...

    Always amazed at the insights of Thomas and his incredible sheep knowledge, equaled only by his humility.
    Thomas, I'm honored for the opportunity to spend two weeks with you in the high country this year. That alone will make it a hunt to remember. I'll do all I can to help you connect with that goat!

    I had planned to hunt sheep this year with my father, but something else came up (namely a desert sheep tag in Nevada) so we're postponing a year. I was lucky enough to pull together another trip with a couple of guys that will surely teach me a thing or two.

    The last few months have been a whirlwind of activity that have made it really difficult to establish a consistent training program. Work has had me in the field from Gustavus to Dillingham to Fairbanks to Ambler. But it's keeping me active, and I'm hitting the mountains and trails as often as possible around that. My girl and I moved into a new house this spring, so that's been occupying plenty of my time. But all in all, I feel pretty good.

    I have what I'm sure will be a tough week of field work starting August 1. Right after that I go on a week long solo caribou hunt in the Talkeetnas (DC590). Getting dropped off in a cub. I'll be in sheep country, so am looking at this hunt as a precursor to my real deal sheep hunt... trim up a little more, get legs and feet in shape, and double (or maybe triple) check gear. A few updates to gear, but for the most part I worked out the kinks on my DS141 hunt last year.

    As for getting obsessed... even when "cuddling" with my lady, I have a hard time not thinking about sheep. hmmm... that sounds wrong in more than one way. <Insert obligatory Wyoming joke here. >
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyo2AK View Post
    .. even when "cuddling" with my lady, I have a hard time not thinking about sheep. hmmm... that sounds wrong in more than one way.
    Don't know where to begin... I'm obsessed as all get out with sheep. Even looking at Ram trucks without provocation.

    But when I'm with my lady- sheep are out of sight and out of mind...

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I am going through gear and packing it up today. I hope to have some pics and a final packing list with all weights done this over the next couple days! Unfortunately I don't expect to see those tiny numbers some post up since all my gear is twice the size of guys like Alaska_Lanche!!

  17. #17

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    LuJon,
    Go to Walmart. Buy as kitchen scale and then start reducing stuff. Weigh everything and then lighten everything up. cut off the labels and cut everything to fit. just don't scrimp on salt.

    Ron Hayes is an old guide who is very interesting. He got into trouble for blowing up landing strips with dynamite. He told me that he would sneak into his clients packs, weigh them and take out everything that was unnecessary and replace them with rocks so it would weigh the same. The clients would be angry initially but would thank him by the end of the trip.

    Alaskalanche and Big Horse- Best of luck. There is a lot of misdirection about sheep numbers in your area. You guys will do fabulous. I will leave it at that.

    Rich,
    I am looking forward to the trip as well.



    Sincerely,
    Thomas

  18. #18
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I have the kitchen scale and a brand new set of fiskars ready to go to work!!

    Most of my gear is about as lite as one can find. The pack is heavier than some at 8 lbs 9 oz but bullet proof and still larger (over 8K cui) while being 4 lbs less than a mystery ranch. Sleeping bag is a WM Versalite, tent is a golite SL 5 with Tigoat Raven bivi. Soto stove with modified jet boil solo cup... The list is long and I will be posting size and weights shortly in another thread since I think many of the items are ones that people have questions about. The killer is that all my clothes are either XLT or 2XL, pack, sleeping bag, and bivi's are all longer versions....

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    The killer is that all my clothes are either XLT or 2XL, pack, sleeping bag, and bivi's are all longer versions....
    Same here...feeling your pain.
    Proud to be an American!

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    I hate to say it, but sheep will be mostly an afterthought for me this year. My wife and I will be walking into some sheep mountains over an extended Labor Day weekend, but that'll mostly be it. The season starts for me this year with early blacktail followed by some caribou. I'm consoling myself with the fact that we're planning our first fly-out for sheep as a couple next year (and only my second sheep fly-out ever). Is it ridiculous to start the countdown at 380 days?

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