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Thread: Wader advice

  1. #1
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    Default Wader advice

    I'm really torn and need some advice. Here is the hunt I have planned:
    • Alaska moose and grizzly hunting
    • Grab canoe and pull canoe upstream on little creeks and small rivers for 3 days. Go over beaver dams, portage a bit, etc
    • Once at hunting area, hunt fairly typical moose habitat.
    • Float rivers back down at end of hunt
    So, what do you recommend for waders?

    Here are two extremes:
    • Light breathable ones like Cabelas dry-plus. These would have the advantage of being cool and light. We will be working very hard and generating a lot of heat. These have the disadvantage of being less tough. The waders wont do much good if they have big holes.
    • Heavy and tough like Lacross Brush Tough: These waders seem a lot less likely to get ripped. But they will very hot and heavy.
    Should I consider hip boot instead of chest waders?
    SHould I bring a spare pair?

    Advice???

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    Quote Originally Posted by mad_angler View Post
    I'm really torn and need some advice. Here is the hunt I have planned:
    • Alaska moose and grizzly hunting
    • Grab canoe and pull canoe upstream on little creeks and small rivers for 3 days. Go over beaver dams, portage a bit, etc
    • Once at hunting area, hunt fairly typical moose habitat.
    • Float rivers back down at end of hunt
    So, what do you recommend for waders?

    Here are two extremes:
    • Light breathable ones like Cabelas dry-plus. These would have the advantage of being cool and light. We will be working very hard and generating a lot of heat. These have the disadvantage of being less tough. The waders wont do much good if they have big holes.
    • Heavy and tough like Lacross Brush Tough: These waders seem a lot less likely to get ripped. But they will very hot and heavy.
    Should I consider hip boot instead of chest waders?
    SHould I bring a spare pair?

    Advice???
    hello,im a hunter and guide here in alaska,the best boot ive found is the cabelas tundra waders,forget the chest waders to hot and hard to wear day after day inless your just fishing,good luck

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    Simms G4 Zips are the only way to go. Like everything else you get what you pay for.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskachallenge@yahoo.com View Post
    hello,im a hunter and guide here in alaska,the best boot ive found is the cabelas tundra waders,forget the chest waders to hot and hard to wear day after day inless your just fishing,good luck
    Are you talking about the boots that have the hip waders that roll up or down?
    Semper Fi and God Bless

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    yes they lace up just like a normal boot and you can walk all day no worries,im on my second pair but i spend 2 to 3 months a year in them

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    Quote Originally Posted by mad_angler View Post
    Should I consider hip boot instead of chest waders?
    SHould I bring a spare pair?

    Advice???
    I'm not much on using chest waders unless I'm wading in waist deep water. I'm especially wary of chest waders when filling them with water would likely lead to my demise (boats, fast moving water, etc.). When it comes to hunting I'm a rubber boot kind of guy and use a set of hip waders only during those times when I need a little more protection from the elements or for deeper water/tundra.

    I bring spare batteries, ammo, matches and fuel. Everything else (boots or waders included) is a "one will have to do" item IMO.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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    You'll be working hard, going upstream, but I'd go with the chest (or even better - waist) waders. You're hunting, not racing. You're probably not going to be dealing with deep water & even if you do get dunked, I'd rather get dunked in chest waders. With a belt they won't fill up fast enough to hurt you. Plenty of guys have drowned using hip boots - they get pretty heavy when filled with water, too. The waders will allow you to sit in the mud, water or snow to cool off (if needed). Also will save having to carry rain pants. An alternative, if the streams will be really shallow, would be to wear super tuffs with rain pants over them. Duct tape the pants to the boots & you can do some knee high wading without getting the boots fiilled. Might be a bit cooler, might not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    You're probably not going to be dealing with deep water & even if you do get dunked, I'd rather get dunked in chest waders. With a belt they won't fill up fast enough to hurt you. Plenty of guys have drowned using hip boots - they get pretty heavy when filled with water, too...
    Not going to argue with you; for that matter many people die each year in their bath tub while not wearing waders...

    Whatever water they will hold the hip waders are safer than chest waders if you go under, but I will admit limited experience on this as I try to stay above the water. That fact may not matter, but it's indisputably true.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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    What ever you get you will never regret getting the tougher ones. My POS chinese hip boots are on only their 5th trip and every crease has rotted out and it leaking. I should have gotten the lacrosse which are three times the price and worth every penny!
    I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. Fred Bear

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    Advice? What does your bear guide recommend?
    "Actions speak louder than words - 'nough said"

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    Not going to argue with you; for that matter many people die each year in their bath tub while not wearing waders...

    Whatever water they will hold the hip waders are safer than chest waders if you go under, but I will admit limited experience on this as I try to stay above the water. That fact may not matter, but it's indisputably true.
    That's why I mentioned wearing a BELT. You wear the belt outside the waders & cinch it tight. When you get in deep water, the air trapped below the belt acts like a floatation device. Yes water will eventually & slowly leak thru, but you should have plenty of time to reach shallow water before this happens. Waders WITHOUT a belt can be a deathtrap, obviously.

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    Pony up the money for Simms G3's or G4's and forget worrying about waders. You can always roll down the chest waders if you're hot, but you can't roll up hip waders if the muck is deep.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Birdstrike View Post
    Pony up the money for Simms G3's or G4's and forget worrying about waders. You can always roll down the chest waders if you're hot, but you can't roll up hip waders if the muck is deep.
    What he said. Any amount of time along Alaska's waterways will find times when hippers are not enough. Likely, equal times will be found when chesties are too high or hot.

    Would be interested in the answer to shphtrs question also.
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    Quote Originally Posted by shphtr View Post
    Advice? What does your bear guide recommend?
    Trip is unguided.
    My brother is a resident of Alaska so that is how I can get a non-resident bear permit.

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    To get an answer of what a guide WOULD recommend, just check any guides website. Almost every one will have an "equipment list" somewhere on the site. The only thing I would say about that is when was the equipment list last revised. Waders are a fairly recent development, as far as use by big game hunters.

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    Another reason to choose waist/chest waders:
    During rainy spells hippers don't cover your whole leg. Rain drips down your jacket/parka and soaks your pants. You would need rain pants over the hippers. Chest/waisties cover high enough that you can do without rain pants.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    I'm not much on using chest waders unless I'm wading in waist deep water. I'm especially wary of chest waders when filling them with water would likely lead to my demise (boats, fast moving water, etc.). ...
    I've heard this statement before but don't really understand it. I am a fanatical duck hunter. I have spent many many days in neoprene waders. I do not see how neoprene waders would be a hazard. They fit pretty tight and don't easily fill up with water. If some water does get in, it seems that the waders would work like a wet suit and help prevent hypothermia.

    Now if you mean canvas or gortex waders, I understand. They could fill up with water and cause problems. It seems that a good belt wouldbe required safety equipment.

  18. #18
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    I would've never supposed that suggesting that wearing chest waders could be dangerous under certain conditions would have received so much attention.

    Last fall I was hunting with a close friend that took a wrong step and went over his head while wearing neoprene chest waders. He was able to back out immediately, in standing water, and was unharmed. He was carrying around several gallons of water (at 8 pounds per gallon), though I admit we did not measure the water. Had the water been moving we both realized that the outcome could have been much different.

    He was not wearing a belt. That may have made a measurable difference, though I suspect the belt would need to be tight enough to be fairly uncomfortable. What I do know is that he was under for an instant and he scooped up water like a bucket. I do not have the experience of some on this forum and obviously I'm talking out of my head, but if you are wanting wetsuit protection, then I suggest wearing a wetsuit. Otherwise be careful with chest waders, belt or no belt. BTDT.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  19. #19

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    For the guys wearing waist and chest waders: Are you choosing boot-foot or stocking-foot waders? If stocking-foot, what is your footwear for wading and hunting?

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    Quote Originally Posted by K Dill View Post
    For the guys wearing waist and chest waders: Are you choosing boot-foot or stocking-foot waders? If stocking-foot, what is your footwear for wading and hunting?
    I've spent a lot of time duck hunting in waders. For duck hunting, all guys wear bootfoot waders. You don't want to worry about losing a boot in the marsh muck. Also, bootfoot waders have boots insulated with dry thinsulate. With stocking foot waders, your boots are wet and have significantly less insulating power.

    It would seem that moose hunters would have the same concerns as duck hunters. But since I've never hunted moose, I am very curious to hear their responses...

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