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Thread: Putting together a Kenai flipping setup...

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    Question Putting together a Kenai flipping setup...

    What are some of the setups people are using for reds on the Kenai? I'm particularly interested in line/leader/weight combos as people seem to be all over the board (straight mono, mono with mono leader, floating line with leader, etc.).

    I've done a fair amount of flipping for reds on the Kenai and have always just used my light king setup (7' rod, spinning reel, 14 lbs. mono) with a fly and some split shot because I couldn't justify the cost of a dedicated red setup. This year, I decided a flippin' stick was finally in order and bought a 9wt Lami and Okuma SLV at Sportsman's. They set me up with backing and floating line... and now I'm honestly a little lost because I'm not a flyfisherman. Help!

    I'll also be bringing my trusty spinning rod with 14 lbs. fluoro as a backup (and safety net in case the fly rod is too unnatural for me) so I'd be interested in suggestion for leader setups on that as well.

    Thanks!

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    Obviously a lot of personal preference but that 9wt. Lamiglass and SLV is EXACTLY what I use and I love it. I would recommend getting rid of that fly line. Put on some bright pink Maxima or Chartruse Andy or... You get the idea. I like 40-50 lb. line becuase it handles like fly line and even casts decently with a weighted fly for shorter distances.

    Doesn't make any sense to use a floating line and then put split shot on your leader TO ME! I have seen plenty of guys do just fine with floating line but I'd sure hat to get spooled by a 10lb. red and watch my $40 line go down stream. I've actually picked up two entire fly lines catching fish that were still attached to them!

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    Quote Originally Posted by limon32 View Post
    Put on some bright pink Maxima or Chartruse Andy or... You get the idea. I like 40-50 lb. line becuase it handles like fly line and even casts decently with a weighted fly for shorter distances.
    Thanks for the reply! Are you weighting this setup or just relying on the weight of the mono/fly?

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    I have been using 2 of the biggest splitshot commonly found at Wally's or Freddies.

    My reference to weighted flies was for places like bird creek.

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    How about you folks out there using floating fly line? What type of leader and weight combos are you running? Thanks again!

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    Ive got a sage 9wt and run just some 30-35# mono for the leader, about 5 ft. long. Depending on the current I put 2 to 3 of the bigger sized split shot on (can't remember the exact weight). Just enough to keep it bouncing along the bottom. For a hook I use nothing but a single Gamakatsu. Put your weight about 2 to 2.5 ft up from your hook.
    Worked great last night, we crushed em.

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    Keep the fly line, add 15lb leader and just fishin it like you're flipping your spinning rig.

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    I like using fly line simply because i like the feel of it in my hands. At the end of the fly line i tie on (nail or tube knot) 30 lb mono, about 3'-4', then a swivel with clip, then a weight. I like to use the rubber surgical tube gripper doovers with line lead that is about 1/4" diameter, my wife prefers banana weights. One advantage to the line lead is that you can cut it based on how how much weight you need to bounce the bottom. After the weight i use about 3' - 3 1/2' of leader, usually 20 lb (less than 30, so IT breaks instead of your main leader...), then a single gamagatsu 7 or so.

    If stuff isn't working try varying the length of the leader between the wt and the hook, the weight and of course your flip style and sweep.

    Tight Lines!
    English is an odd language. It can understood through tough thorough thought, though.

  9. #9

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    8wt. pflueger purist (sweet rod for the money) with full sink line and about 5 or 5.5' of 50 lb. leader, yes 50 lb... I dont screw around with these reds, and i'm not in the business of loosing gear. I tie on a 4/0 gamakatsu with a tiny bit of yarn to stay legal, then i get the biggest split shot and either use 2 or 3 depending on the current and water depth. I put the split shot on the leader at least 4' up from the hook and then tie a knot in the leader under the split shot so they dont slide down all the time. With the 50 lb. leader you dont have to worry about the line weakening from the knot. This set up has worked the very best for me.

    Word of advice: dont mess around with those cheesy coho flies. Just get a gamagatsu and they will stay sharper and i personally believe they will set deeper and more solid in the fish. Just my personal opinion though..

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    I use a 8' 9wt with 20 or 25lb mono leader - the key, in my opinion, to keeping gear is a nice "hard" i.e. abrasion resistant mono, Maxima has worked well for me in the past, others offer good stuff too. The rocky bottom of the Kenai beats up soft stuff quickly.

    I wouldn't mess with expensive fly rods & reels for Kenai combat fishing but that's a personal choice.

    If you go with heavy mono, as others above suggest, I seriously doubt you'll have any issues and you'll be able to horse fish in when your in a crowd. I use a sinking tip fly line and normally a six to seven foot length of mono for a leader. This allows me a few chances to rerig if I lose a fly.

    Split shot is the way to go if you move around a lot - it's easy to tune for the current your in quickly. Surgical tube with pencil weight, in my experience, is the best setup to keep you from snagging bottom easily. If you fish the same location repeatedly I would go that route. I usually put the weight two and a half to three feet from the fly - if you feel like you missing something move the weight around to suite you technique and/or conditions.

    Definitely skip the 99 cent sockeye flies at the box store and get some gamakatsu's with yarn - somebody correct me if I'm wrong but I think you can buy this "package" at Ken's Tackle in Soldotna for $2 and change if you want an example.

    -Ben

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    Quote Originally Posted by ben_ak View Post
    I use a 8' 9wt with 20 or 25lb mono leader - the key, in my opinion, to keeping gear is a nice "hard" i.e. abrasion resistant mono, Maxima has worked well for me in the past, others offer good stuff too. The rocky bottom of the Kenai beats up soft stuff quickly.

    I wouldn't mess with expensive fly rods & reels for Kenai combat fishing but that's a personal choice.

    If you go with heavy mono, as others above suggest, I seriously doubt you'll have any issues and you'll be able to horse fish in when your in a crowd. I use a sinking tip fly line and normally a six to seven foot length of mono for a leader. This allows me a few chances to rerig if I lose a fly.

    Split shot is the way to go if you move around a lot - it's easy to tune for the current your in quickly. Surgical tube with pencil weight, in my experience, is the best setup to keep you from snagging bottom easily. If you fish the same location repeatedly I would go that route. I usually put the weight two and a half to three feet from the fly - if you feel like you missing something move the weight around to suite you technique and/or conditions.

    Definitely skip the 99 cent sockeye flies at the box store and get some gamakatsu's with yarn - somebody correct me if I'm wrong but I think you can buy this "package" at Ken's Tackle in Soldotna for $2 and change if you want an example.

    -Ben
    + 1. Great post.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    I use a 8' 9wt with 20 or 25lb mono leader - the key, in my opinion, to keeping gear is a nice "hard" i.e. abrasion resistant mono, Maxima has worked well for me in the past, others offer good stuff too. The rocky bottom of the Kenai beats up soft stuff quickly.

    I prefer a 10' fly pole and use 20lb mono leader at about 5-7 feet in length depending. Just be sure to check your line once in a while to see if it is getting damaged by the bottom of the river.

    I wouldn't mess with expensive fly rods & reels for Kenai combat fishing but that's a personal choice.

    I agree to some degree but the rod does not have to be for combat fishing only so having a nicer rod is better in the long run imo. I'd buy a nice reel if I plan to do this for more than 1 season.

    If you go with heavy mono, as others above suggest, I seriously doubt you'll have any issues and you'll be able to horse fish in when your in a crowd. I use a sinking tip fly line and normally a six to seven foot length of mono for a leader. This allows me a few chances to rerig if I lose a fly.

    Agree totally. I like a 10ft sinking tip.

    Split shot is the way to go if you move around a lot - it's easy to tune for the current your in quickly. Surgical tube with pencil weight, in my experience, is the best setup to keep you from snagging bottom easily. If you fish the same location repeatedly I would go that route. I usually put the weight two and a half to three feet from the fly - if you feel like you missing something move the weight around to suite you technique and/or conditions.

    I use a three way swivel and so my weight is very close to the starting length of my mono line and I haven't had any problems fishing with the weights where they are *3 to 4 inches of mono line*. I no longer put my weights on the same line as my hook because I have had my line break right where the weights were placed. Most likely my fault in weaking the mono line after pinching the weights down.

    Definitely skip the 99 cent sockeye flies at the box store and get some gamakatsu's with yarn - somebody correct me if I'm wrong but I think you can buy this "package" at Ken's Tackle in Soldotna for $2 and change if you want an example.

    I don't agree fully with this. Just make sure your hook has a barb on it unless you want a challenge.

  13. #13
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    ]I use a 8' 9wt with 20 or 25lb mono leader - the key, in my opinion, to keeping gear is a nice "hard" i.e. abrasion resistant mono, Maxima has worked well for me in the past, others offer good stuff too. The rocky bottom of the Kenai beats up soft stuff quickly.

    I prefer a 10' fly pole and use 20lb mono leader at about 5-7 feet in length depending. Just be sure to check your line once in a while to see if it is getting damaged by the bottom of the river.

    I wouldn't mess with expensive fly rods & reels for Kenai combat fishing but that's a personal choice.

    I agree to some degree but the rod does not have to be for combat fishing only so having a nicer rod is better in the long run imo. I'd buy a nice reel if I plan to do this for more than 1 season.

    Bluesummers is right, I should have clarified a bit here. I do not mean go out and by a $50 packaged combo at Fred Meyer - I think the Okuma SLV 8/9 is a perfect reel for flipping, in fact I just landed another six today on mine (third season with it). I am not familiar with the Pflueger Purist mentioned earlier but Lamiglass is a great choice for a rod. My point is that you don't need to drop a grand in a rod/reel combo to be effective.

    If you go with heavy mono, as others above suggest, I seriously doubt you'll have any issues and you'll be able to horse fish in when your in a crowd. I use a sinking tip fly line and normally a six to seven foot length of mono for a leader. This allows me a few chances to rerig if I lose a fly.

    Agree totally. I like a 10ft sinking tip.

    Split shot is the way to go if you move around a lot - it's easy to tune for the current your in quickly. Surgical tube with pencil weight, in my experience, is the best setup to keep you from snagging bottom easily. If you fish the same location repeatedly I would go that route. I usually put the weight two and a half to three feet from the fly - if you feel like you missing something move the weight around to suite you technique and/or conditions.

    I use a three way swivel and so my weight is very close to the starting length of my mono line and I haven't had any problems fishing with the weights where they are *3 to 4 inches of mono line*. I no longer put my weights on the same line as my hook because I have had my line break right where the weights were placed. Most likely my fault in weaking the mono line after pinching the weights down.

    Bluesummers is correct here too, the three way swivel works very well also. I also have seen line breaks where the weights are clipped on, again the "hard" mono leader can help here but you will have to watch it.

    Definitely skip the 99 cent sockeye flies at the box store and get some gamakatsu's with yarn - somebody correct me if I'm wrong but I think you can buy this "package" at Ken's Tackle in Soldotna for $2 and change if you want an example.

    I don't agree fully with this. Just make sure your hook has a barb on it unless you want a challenge.

    Most of the 99 cent sockeye flies use cheap hooks that aren't sharp to begin with and don't stay sharp with use, Gamakatsu and Mustad hooks are sharp out of the box and stay sharp longer, in my opinion. Make sure you follow the regs on the upper river, here is a quote:

    Unbaited, single-hook, artificial lures only: The maximum gap allowed between point and shank is ⅜. Single hook means a fish hook with one point, with or without a barb.

    I think you have some good info now Akpryde, go kill some sockeyes. My grandfather showed me how to rig up a fly rod for flipping in the early nineties, I've never gone back, you probably won't either.

    -Ben

  14. #14
    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    just picked up an Okuma SLV and its an excellent reel. takes a little getting used to after a spinning setup but its nice.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

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