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Thread: Do you pay attention to temp. insensitive powders?

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    Default Do you pay attention to temp. insensitive powders?

    I try to use powders that are temperature insensitive as the chronograph will show a loss of speed in very cold temperatures. This obviously effects holdovers downrange, let's say over 300 yards. It is not uncommon for me to hunt elk in below zero temps and I have found a loss of 100-125fps with some common calibers in the past. I haven't hunted in those low temps in Alaska but I am sure many of you here have. As a result, I use a lot of Hodgdons Extreme powders.

    So, with all the attention paid to runout, COAL's, extreme spreads and the like, how much attention do you guys pay to temperature insensitive powders?

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knikglacier View Post
    So, with all the attention paid to runout, COAL's, extreme spreads and the like, how much attention do you guys pay to temperature insensitive powders?
    Very little.

    As you indicated, there is some difference in velocity depending upon the temperature, but I've never chronographed in weather below -10į and I've not seen losses approaching triple digits. Granted my summertime high is about 60į so I simply do not face the extremes others might encounter. IME these losses do not amount to needing correction at hunting ranges.
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    Pretty much what 1Cor15:19 said. I just don't shoot at game much farther than 300yds and then only if I can't get closer. At that distance it just doesn't matter much. I don't pay a whole lot of attention to runout, extreme spread and the like either. If I can get 1 moa or close, I'm good to go. And that is not all that hard to do normally.

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    Just with H110/W296 because it gets very finicky to light when real cold then burns very erratic. Velocity spreads of 100fps or a little more donít bother me for what I do but hang-fires or loosing like 500fps like you get from H110 at -30f or so sucks. Good powder as long as you donít use it in negative temps though.
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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    I use Varget in my varmit loads for two reasons. One: It is very accurate in my load I worked up. Second: This is the only time I will shoot at animals when it is extremely cold and out to some long ranges. All my other rifles get used for hunting season in the fall or shooting at the range and im not into doing that when it's so cold the scope wants to stick to your eyes...

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by knikglacier View Post
    I try to use powders that are temperature insensitive as the chronograph will show a loss of speed in very cold temperatures. This obviously effects holdovers downrange, let's say over 300 yards. It is not uncommon for me to hunt elk in below zero temps and I have found a loss of 100-125fps with some common calibers in the past. I haven't hunted in those low temps in Alaska but I am sure many of you here have. As a result, I use a lot of Hodgdons Extreme powders.

    So, with all the attention paid to runout, COAL's, extreme spreads and the like, how much attention do you guys pay to temperature insensitive powders?

    I still have a considerable supply of the "old" temperature-sensitive powders, so will likely continue to use them until they are gone. Besides, I seldom hunt in really cold conditions anymore. (starting to get old) If I was going to purchase powder today, then yes...I would seriously consider getting some of the new better-performing powders.

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    For Alaskan hunting not usually, esp. since for the most part the majority of big game hunting and seasons are closed by the time the temp drops to 20 or so.
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    I hunt in both AK and MT(when I get lucky and draw) so I pay a lot of attention to the temp. insensitive powders. If, as stated above you are hunting in an area where most of the season the temperature ranges are not that high or low then I would pretty much ignore them. However, if you are hunting goats in late october, you will probably find a drastic difference. When I can draw I am usually in NW Montana hunting for deer and elk, so I use H1000 in my 300WM. I tried retumbo but it didn't provide me with the same consistent groups that the H1000 did. I used a chronograph one year in MT while I was shooting to make sure nothing happened on the flight and the velocity difference was 37-55fps below the velocity I had in AK during the summer. I shot 5 rounds. I can't recall what the exact temp was when I shot in MT but it was pretty cold. Also, I was at about 3700ft elevation vs basically 0 at birchwood. The higher elevation could have played a part on it too, that was just what I have found.

  9. #9

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    Not much, but I mainly use RL19 and H4350sc, since they are readily available and work well for me. If I had other powders that worked I would use them up.

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    I pay a lot of attention to the average temperature of the hunt area during the time I would be hunting there. The biggest concern I have is not extreme cold, but the oppasite- extreme heat. Some hunts here in Alaska the temp is above "normal" for one reason or another. My buffalo hunt for example the temp was 15 degrees above average that whole week. I also load to hunt Texas whitetails in November, the temps can be from 70 to 115 degrees.... Using a chorny I discovered above 100 degrees heat soaked ammo gains pressure and velocity- not necessarily a good thing. Have had sticky brass and more felt recoil. Once when hunting at 45 below, I experienced a sloooow burn, with unburned powder pushed out onto the snow even. But, still harvested the animal I was hunting. If or when I go to Africa, I am going to study a lot more or temp friendly powders.

    Chris

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