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Thread: Scott Hudson Bay on the Erie canal

  1. #1

    Default Scott Hudson Bay on the Erie canal

    These folks just completed a 106 mile trip on the Erie canal in New Yok state. they are running a 8 hp Honda.



    hb#1.jpg

  2. #2
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    Very COOL!!!

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    Default Our Canoe Camper

    Hi all,

    Thank you Pat for alerting me to this website and for posting a photo of our boat, Odonata (latin for the insect order that includes the dragonfly).

    This is clearly the premier forum on all things involving freighter canoes, and I wished I had paid attention to it much earlier. Great advice is to be found here, and would have helped me in my earlier decisions about my own boat. I've enjoyed the posts about running frieghters in the great north, and though I would love to do those rivers someday, I've got a lot of northeastern US and southern Canadian waters to explore first. My wife and I have found the Scott Hudson Bay to be well suited to our needs and the rivers and canals we run. Clearly our boat requirements are a tad different than that of most of you, hence our HB has evolved in a direction that might not be completely suitable in the Yukon. That said, we may have some experiences, and the boat some design elements, that you folks might find helpful. I know that in one hour I've learned more from your posts than from all other sources I consulted.

    We were looking for a trailerable, lightweight but voluminous boat to take us camping on lower North American rivers, waters that tend to be realatively deep and slow moving, like the Connecticut River nearby, and the Hudson, Delaware, and Susquhehanna further afield. I stumbled across the Scott line of freighters in 2006, and bought one from Two Rivers Canoe in Medway, Maine (www.tworiverscanoe.com). Several camping trips later in the stock boat led to some silly notions about being able to sleep on board, which led to ideas about mating tents with boats, and this idea and that idea until we ended up outfitting the boat as the picture shows. We do like our creature comforts.

    We sleep quite comfortably in the dry, mosquito proof tent, cook on board, and even have a porta-poti in the stern. She's cramped, but self sufficient, so we don't have to rely on finding camping spots along our more populated rivers. The boat is extremely stable, as you all know. Pat mentioned that we've just got back from 7 days on the Erie Canal; 106 miles, 5.5 gallons of gas at an average of 7.5 miles per hour (top speed is about 10.5 mph with our 8hp Honda 4 stroke), which I think is about 19 miles per gallon, better than the truck we use to pull the boat down the highway. It was an inexpensive but spectacular vacation.

    I look forward to hearing more of your ideas, experiments, trips, and trials.

    Bing

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    Welcome aboard Bing!!

    Perhaps we can learn a thing or two from you as well!!

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bing View Post
    Hi all,

    This is clearly the premier forum on all things involving freighter canoes, and I wished I had paid attention to it much earlier. Bing
    Me too. I ran onto this sight a couple years ago. It's the only computer forum I've found of folks that run motor canoes like I do. Pick through the the old posts sometime. Lot of interesting pictures, some of them from the 60s. Zack.

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Welcome Bing

    I grew up in the great lakes area and have done the errie canal a couple of times with my family. I run a HB here in Alaska with a 20hr 4 stroke. We camp in a wall tent but Love our HB!!!!!!!
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

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    Default gr8 rig

    Welcome Bing, would love to hear more.

    I have one first question though. I have the Scott just smaller than yours (Albany) and I'm running a 4 stroke motor twice the size of yours. Is there a reason you went with that size, or possibly is that just the motor you already had?

    Keep those posts coming. More pictures would be appreciated by many on here too; you've got a heckuva nice rig there!

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    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Very Cool..
    thanks for your membership here ..
    we are very grateful for new perspectives and ideas..
    you have done well with your boat..
    Thand you
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskacanoe View Post
    you have done well with your boat..
    Boat? Its more like a ship !

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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    Welcome Bing, would love to hear more.

    I have one first question though. I have the Scott just smaller than yours (Albany) and I'm running a 4 stroke motor twice the size of yours. Is there a reason you went with that size, or possibly is that just the motor you already had?

    Keep those posts coming. More pictures would be appreciated by many on here too; you've got a heckuva nice rig there!
    Morning all,

    Sorry I wasn't watching this post in the past couple of days. I'll get some more photos uploaded tonight. In reply to your question about the motor, Two Rivers Canoe in Maine suggested the size, as that is what they seem to commonly use in the Alagash waterways and lakes in Maine. I don't know if there is a motor size restriction there or not (somebody from Maine may want to address that). Two Rivers has sold a lot of freighters for the northern New England market. We are quite satisfied with the 8hp; small enough to dismount and carry for servicing or repairs, plenty of HP for the speeds we like, and good fuel efficiency (a slightly larger motor run at a lower throttle setting might be just as good on fuel though). If I could do it over again, I would probably choose a 9.9, for no other reason than it has a better charging circuit for a battery for lights and what not. Currently we do not have a battery on the boat.

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    [IMG][/IMG]

    Though a little grainy, here's my best picture of the boat's profile.

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    [IMG][/IMG]

    I'm having problems getting my photos to the size you want on the forum. This is a shot of the boat in 2009 before the new paint scheme, but it gives you a clearer picture of how I altered the hull. I removed the thwarts and the center seat, replacing both with two glassed in bulkheads with doors, and installed a raised coaming around the "cabin." The cabin tent snaps down to the top of the coaming, thus rainwater sheds either overboard or into the bow or stern, but not into the cabin. I also fabricated a large aluminum bow deck to fix a mooring cleat and a mast step (just a flag pole). Yes, I'd thought about a sail, but that seemed to be a over the top, pushing the envelope.

    [IMG][/IMG]

    I no longe use the bows for holding the mooring cover up. I've since replaced those with telescoping aluminum poles, which work far better.

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Very impressive indeed! Thanks for sharing the additional photos.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

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    [IMG][/IMG]

    Note telescoping tiller extension and the remote shift and throttle (lower right corner of tent). I stand up to pilot the boat, looking over the tent. We rarely motor for more than an hour or two at a time, so this isn't as unfomfortable as it sounds. I put a strap across the back of the bimini frame, so between the strap, the frame right and left, and the tent in front, I feel very secure in standing. The two upright poles on either side of the door are my "holder onner's," and may hopefully one day become two halves of a sculling oar (we carry two canoe paddles as well). We can also tie back the ends of the tent and I can sit on top of the porta poti (pictured with the orange boat cushion on top)and peer through the "tunnel," which affords suprisingly good visibility (honestly, I'd rather stand). I can shift the porta-poti about when motoring and use it as a foot rest. When the chief mate is up forward sitting in the bow and not moving around (or isn't on board), steering is done by a subtle shifting of my weight from side to side. I've gone for miles up twisty rivers without ever touching the tiller (the motor pivot tension screw has to be tightend in a bit, but not too much). The bimini keeps my head out of the sun, and can collapse in about a minute if the wind gets up.


    [IMG][/IMG]

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    [IMG][/IMG]

    Here's a shot of the tent frame and supporting rigging. I had made a temporary rig using 3/4" CPVC tubing for bows, but the CPVC worked so well and was so durable I made it the permanent solution. The key component is the snap clip, pictured just at the knot in the guy line. These clips are made to attach CPVC water piping to a wall in a house, but work perfectly for my application. The whole tent frame and hardware came to about twenty bucks. I can set up or take down the tent in about ten minutes, and all the parts, including the bimini, fit into the cabin when trailering. Even if none of you built a tent as I did, the CPVC bows and clips could provide you with some options for other canoes or boats for cargo covers and what not.

    I did not sew up the canvas work. The bimini, tent, aft skirt, and mooring cover cost me about $1500. Bev at Village Canvas in Meredith, NH, can work wonders with Sunbrella canvas.

    [IMG][/IMG]

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    [IMG][/IMG]

    This shot of the cabin interior shows the carpet rolled back to reveal the removable floorboards, which are lifted out and fit between the benchs to form a sleeping platform.

    [IMG][/IMG]

    Bed all made up and ready for the evening. This is about 48" wide in the Hudson Bay, good enough for two if you like one another.

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    [IMG][/IMG]

    The bow. Paddle in it's slot. We carry two (5) gallon water jugs, plus a (2) gallon jug with spigot in the cabin for ready use. Also up front are a danforth and mushroom anchor, the ice chest, portable bilge pump, boat hook, and spare stove fuel canisters.

    I installed glassed in plwood floors in both the bow and stern section. The void underneath is filled with closed cell floatation foam. I had to compensate for the floatation removed when I removed the center seat. By the way, I thought it just a bit cheap for Scott to have filled the floatation compartments in the seats with nothing more than rolled up bubble wrap. I guess that works, but I was expecting foam, which would have filled the voids better than a wad of plastic.

    [IMG][/IMG]

    Here's a close up of the aluminum fore deck. I pull out the flag staff and screw on my LED portable running light. It's attached to a PVC cap with threads down on the pipe nipple welded to the fore deck. Works great.

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    [IMG][/IMG]

    Despite the green water, this was a cool place to be. We'd just come off the Champlain Canal, it was hot as hades, and the "Pub Docking" sign was a welcome relief at this marina.

    [IMG][/IMG]

    Here's a shot from the "pilot house" as we approach a lock on the Erie Canal. The lockmasters are great, can't do enough to help you, and will even lock through a single kayak. We've had a ton of fun with our boat, feel quite safe in it's stable hull, and spend little money on our travels.

    I'll end of these series of posts here, as I think I've provided about as much detail as there is to see. If anyone wants more info, I'm pleased to share all I know.

    Bing

  20. #20

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    Welcome to the forum Bing. The only thing left for that rig it a grinding organ and a monkey. You must have countless hours of work and thought into the project. It's amazing how you fit it all together. I've been thinking about building a cover for my James Bay and your plastic pipe idea may work for the ribs. I've built hundreds of PVC bows for Cub Scout day camps and such with zero failure. It's durable stuff until it gets below freezing. Thanks for posting the pictures.

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