Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: 12' Lake Boat Big Enough for Shelikof Strait?

  1. #1
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,790

    Default 12' Lake Boat Big Enough for Shelikof Strait?

    I upgraded to extra floatation, has a 20hp motor and self bailer. I put a cabin on it to keep dry. Just want to see what your opinion is. I want it for bear hunting on the Ak. Peninsula.









    Hah! Just messing with you guys. There's been a spate of such posts lately.

  2. #2
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    I upgraded to extra floatation, has a 20hp motor and self bailer. I put a cabin on it to keep dry. Just want to see what your opinion is. I want it for bear hunting on the Ak. Peninsula.









    Hah! Just messing with you guys. There's been a spate of such posts lately.
    You will be using a .223 for the bruins, right?
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  3. #3
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    You will be using a .223 for the bruins, right?
    Gosh, .223 seems like too much gun. I was thinking .22 mag.

  4. #4

    Default

    Having crossed the Shelikof once in my youth with a 13' Achilles and 25-horse, I have to surmise you're counting on great weather and good luck. It was flat calm when I took off from Malina Bay, and I made the crossing in right at 40 minutes. Good thing it wasn't 45 minutes because by the time I caught the boat I was meeting the wind had built to 30 and the seas were running close to 10'. Half an hour later the tide changed and it built to 60/20. And that was August, rather than spring or fall when the weather gets really bad quickly.

    Just make sure the barrel on your 22 mag isn't so long you can't get the muzzle in your mouth and your finger on the trigger. It will be a faster way to go, at least.

  5. #5

    Default

    How do you figure to get a 14'-8" Brown Bear, with a 41" skull into a 12' boat........Really what are you thinking........? You need a 16' jon boat for open water.

  6. #6
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    4,887

    Default You forgot the Halibut!

    While your at it maybe you should ask for some GPS coordinates for somones Halibut honey hole in the area.
    Not general areas to try ask for exact coordinates.
    I am sure you could put a couple of halibut on your boat with the bear and the extra meat will be a nice bonus.
    btw anyone who refuses to give you coordinates is a jerk!
    Last edited by kasilofchrisn; 07-17-2011 at 18:40. Reason: added smilies
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  7. #7
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tanana Valley AK
    Posts
    7,218

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    You will be using a .223 for the bruins, right?
    ".223, .224. whatever it takes..."
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  8. #8
    Member JR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,129

    Default

    I think your boat is too big, I have a fold-a-boat if you want to use that. It does not have a motor but I have some good oars and you should be able to make good time with it.
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

  9. #9
    Member jkb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,466

    Default

    Maybe you should think about a pack raft with a minnekota trolling motor. You could carry a solar array to recharge the battery.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

  10. #10
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,790

    Default

    JKB, the pack raft is my lifeboat. It goes on the roof.
    AGL and Kasilof, I will put the halibut and the bear hide and skull in the Pack raft, so no problem. The GPS coords will be right there in my handheld.
    JR2, no, won't go smaller than 12', but will have the oars.
    Brownbear, you are da man!
    IOTT, .224!?

    BTW, on a more realistic note, I ran into some crazy Norwegians out in Dillingham who were going around the arctic in a (18'?) cuddy cabin skiff. Don't think they made it much past the Alaska peninsula. I also heard of a guy and his wife who had taken an aluminum canoe all the way around the AK Peninsula to Bristol Bay. Oh yeah, and I knew a guy who bought a 16' Lund skiff in Fairbanks and took it all the way down the Chena, Tanana and Yukon to the coast and then around and up the Kvichak to Pedro Bay. There are some truly gutsy people in the world!

  11. #11
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    4,887

    Default

    I have a friend who took a 19' silverstreak from bristol bay area to homer 2 summers ago. He had engines troubles twice. Once he got into king salmon changed filters and made it to Kodiak before more trouble. Limped it in at idle and had them fix it while he was on the slope then on to Homer. He said it was still under warranty so he wasn't worried.

    I was at Marine services in Homer a couple of years ago and Bill the owner was telling me about some guys from Europe attempting an around the world in a 20' boat. They had an extra 55 gallon drum for fuel. They had called him to see if he could be sure and have parts on hand to fully service their outboard.I guess they made it to the Nome area before they got tired of each other left the boat and went home to somewhere in Europe.

    Sayak my buddy has a 14' aluminun flatbottom in his back yard his kids use as a sand box. It is a little beat up but was floating before he put sand in it. If I scrounge up a motor for it maybe I could tag along with you? My dad has an old 15hp he might loan me and We would be safer running together. The bigger flatbottom would be a nice safety measure with the extra 2'.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  12. #12
    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    tustumena & kasilof
    Posts
    899

    Default

    http://www.mv-voice.com/morgue/2004/...0.sailor.shtml
    Man who traveled across Atlantic in tiny boat to give talk


    Sailor made trip in 105 days
    By Huong C. Pham
    The massive Queen Mary 2 made history when it crossed the Atlantic Ocean earlier this year. So did Hugo Vihlen. But the trips could not have been more different.

    Vihlen, now 72, completed his 105-day voyage in 1993 on a 5-foot-4-inch boat named Father's Day. With the trip, he set a new record for smallest boat to have crossed the Atlantic.

    Vihlen will speak about his journey at the Microsoft Conference Center on La Avenida Street, where he will also promote his book "The Stormy Voyage of Father's Day."

    The Florida native first broke a world record for crossing the Atlantic in his 5-foot, 11-inch boat, April Fool, in 1968. Months after his title was taken in 1993 by Englishman Tom McNally, Vihlen, a former military pilot, made a fifth and final attempt to cross the Atlantic, entitling him record holder again.

    The major danger in trying such a trip, Vihlen said, was if something were to happen, "there is no such thing as a backup plan. The water is so cold, you have about 20 minutes to live, even with a life jacket."

    Vihlen said there were days when he had to roll with waves 12- and 16-feet-tall and once encountered a 30-foot-tall wave. But the more important concerns Vihlen faced were whales and ships. Whales could ram his little boat and ships with enormous propellers could shred it, he said.

    Without any specific calculations of days at sea, Vihlen had enough food for 85 days. He stretched his rations -- 65 MREs (meals ready to eat), two gallons of M&Ms, a gallon of dry fruit, 100 cans of Hawaiian Punch and 34 gallons of water -- to last the entire trip. To pass the time, he read a few books including the dictionary, a world almanac and a sailing book.
    With all his supplies, there was only enough room for Vihlen to sleep in a fetal position, waking up every hour to the sound of his alarm clock to make sure he was not straying off course.
    fathersday.jpg

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •