Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Is 17' big enough for Kachemak Bay

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    7

    Default Is 17' big enough for Kachemak Bay

    I have a 17' Alumaweld Talon with a 50hp 4-stroke Yamaha which does the lakes, rivers and dip-netting really well. I would like to do some Halibut fishing and exploring the Islands across Kachemak. What are your thoughts and opinions.

  2. #2
    Member Trakn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    241

    Default

    Early in the morning when it's flat calm it's ok. The bay always blows up in the afternoon so early and late are your best bets. Look out across there and if it's flat calm go,,, if not don't go. Any bit of a chop out there,,, for your boat is to big. Get in behind Yukon Island and go from there lots to see and do,,, maybe some halibut behind the Island as well.

  3. #3
    Member Bob the fisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,011

    Default

    I second Trakn's thoughts...watch the weather, if seas are two footers or less, go for it...I go out of homer quite often in an 18' Alumaweld Stryker and if the seas are less than 2 foot, things are great...if not, crack a cold one and fish the lagoon..."fishon"

  4. #4
    Member Jimw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    452

    Default

    Been out there in a 22' sea runner with a Yami 115 a lot. we go out 27 miles from the harbor to our "spot". We head out at 6am and a usally back by 11:00am. Depending on the weather and tides ihave seen it get really ugly in a matter of what seamed like minutes. Coming back and taking heavy spray over the bow most of the way back made for some intersting times. I have to agree with the reast watch the weather and pick your time carefully. I thought the 22' was plenty of boat, but on a couple of trips she was a little on the small side.
    2005 20' Weldcraft Sabre XL 350 MP
    SD309 AT
    2009 Polaris Dragon 800 163
    Custom Mod's

  5. #5

    Default

    I agree with the other 2 posts.. Flat go if not stay home another thing to consider is even if the water is flat right out of the harbor will not be because of other boat wakes that some times is the worst spot in the bay (on nice days)

  6. #6

    Default

    I think it is if you're up for it. Go on high pressure days with light winds 10 kts or less, a small tidal change, a forecast of 2 feet or less, and it should be a great day. 3-4 foot chop with 20 kt winds could be interesting in your boat and something I would strive to avoid.

  7. #7
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,453

    Default

    i was curious on this same question, i've got a 20 footer and lots of boat time in skiffs and quiet a bit on the water, would you mostly be watching out for a south wind that causes most the problems in there? love the salt water but can't afford a salt boat to check everything i want, so trying to find local areas i can put put around in and coves to pull up on and spend some time jiggin' for whatever will bite!!
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  8. #8

    Default

    No one really touched on an important factor except TR; tidal change. Pretty important as a sw wind combined with an ebb will produce steep chop. Yesterday was mostly nice till about 4 pm then 2-3' breaking waves, calmed down by about 8 pm.
    I now run a Hewes 24' (as a water taxi here in kbay) so wasn't necessarily dangerous but had to pay attention, trim motors up a bit, slow down.
    Anyone here can call me on my cell # for a report, pm as needed.
    Also it's not unusual at all to have a strong north or ne wind.

  9. #9
    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Interior
    Posts
    2,101

    Default

    You'll be fine. I run my 16 foot down there all the time. Just watch the weather and dont get stupid. If the wind starts picking up head out quick. If the weather report calls for 4ft seas stay home. Its not rocket science. Be smart and youll have a good time and catch fish.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

  10. #10
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,453

    Default

    Well my boat is finally in my driveway!!! All this is getting more real now. How far out do you need to run to pick up a handful
    Of
    Chickens or do some jiggin for rockfish of some sort?
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1

    Default

    I have a relatively small 17.5' Alumacraft Dominator that I took the wife out on about 3 weeks ago out of Homer for our very first saltwater trip. Similar setup as the OP - 50HP Yamaha 4-stroke, used best on the lakes and rivers. When we left Anchorage, the forecast called for mostly sunny, 2 ft seas increasing to 4 ft with 10 kts of SW winds in the afternoon - about typical for a "nice" day in K-bay. We overnighted in Homer, then left first thing the following morning, and the waters were glassy and flat. My boat tops out at about 20 mph (per GPS) with just to two of us and 40 gal of fuel. We went due west off the spit for about an hour, but as the morning fog burned off, the winds started to pick up the further out we got, so we stopped and fished no more than 20 miles out of town. The boat was getting rocked around pretty good, but not anywhere as much as being on the Kenai during dipnet season, so I knew we were still okay.

    I don't think we were out as far as I wanted to be because we only caught a single polluck, which tells me that the bottom was probably too sandy or muddy still. We decided to head back early that afternoon just as the whitecaps started showing up. The trip back in to town was a bit bumpy, prompting me to throttle back a little and ride the waves in. Nonetheless, the trip was completely doable in out small little boat with our little outboard. I've read elsewhere that there may be a couple of chicken holes within 10 miles of the spit... But since I'm such a novice of the Homer/K-bay area, it will definitely take me some time to figure out where the 'buts are at!

    Good luck and tight lines!

  12. #12
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by olypop View Post
    I have a relatively small 17.5' Alumacraft Dominator that I took the wife out on about 3 weeks ago out of Homer for our very first saltwater trip. Similar setup as the OP - 50HP Yamaha 4-stroke, used best on the lakes and rivers. When we left Anchorage, the forecast called for mostly sunny, 2 ft seas increasing to 4 ft with 10 kts of SW winds in the afternoon - about typical for a "nice" day in K-bay. We overnighted in Homer, then left first thing the following morning, and the waters were glassy and flat. My boat tops out at about 20 mph (per GPS) with just to two of us and 40 gal of fuel. We went due west off the spit for about an hour, but as the morning fog burned off, the winds started to pick up the further out we got, so we stopped and fished no more than 20 miles out of town. The boat was getting rocked around pretty good, but not anywhere as much as being on the Kenai during dipnet season, so I knew we were still okay.

    I don't think we were out as far as I wanted to be because we only caught a single polluck, which tells me that the bottom was probably too sandy or muddy still. We decided to head back early that afternoon just as the whitecaps started showing up. The trip back in to town was a bit bumpy, prompting me to throttle back a little and ride the waves in. Nonetheless, the trip was completely doable in out small little boat with our little outboard. I've read elsewhere that there may be a couple of chicken holes within 10 miles of the spit... But since I'm such a novice of the Homer/K-bay area, it will definitely take me some time to figure out where the 'buts are at!

    Good luck and tight lines!
    Straight out from the spit 20 miles, on a course of about 240 degrees, should have put you on an area known historically as the 19 fathom bumps (114 ft - more or less) , Bottom is very sandy yet uneven, and usually yields a decent Chicken bite. You don't say anything about how deep you were fishing and what you were using for bait.

  13. #13
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,837

    Default

    I was duck hunting last December across the bay. Weather was forecasted for 10 and 2's from the N. Hunted the day and it was flat heading across. We went into tutka and the wind was tunneling into it. We made a set, then moved into Sadie. I dropped the wife and dog and the did some scouting and the wind was coming hard down the bay from the south. We got cold and wet and I decided to call it a day. Came into Yukon area and peeked out and it looked like 3's and 4's so I started the run. Pretty soon it was a E/NE wind and I was running in 8's and 10's. My windshield wiper quit working and the freezing spray was stacking up on me. We made it, but it was 4 miles of pucker factor that I don't want to do again. I have an 18' searunner........

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •