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Thread: Cracker bait lure?

  1. #1

    Default Cracker bait lure?

    Has anyone every tried this lure? $37 dollars is it worth it?

  2. #2
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Interesting idea.

    For $37.00, though, I'll let someone else try them first....lol.

    For everyone wondering what we're talking about, here ya go: http://www.fishcrackerbaits.com/index.html

  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Haven't tried one. I have used enough conventional jigs of various configurations to be convinced that halibut really aren't that hard to catch if you are fishing the right area, and that a $6-12 jig will work just fine. That and I snag and break off enough jigs each season that I really would get upset about loosing something that costs close to $40. I'd also say that scent is likely a much better way to attract fish than sound, so look into putting some scent on your jigs.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I gotta agree with you Paul H. I had they guy from Glo Crazy trying to reel me in for a sale at the sportsmans show last year.
    I told him we had not failed to limit out on halibut in my last several trips to Homer. I asked him what would be my motivation to buy his lure when my exsisting selection of jigs and bait setups have worked so well. He had no answer and I moved on.
    They aren't often biguns but we always catch plenty of chickens.
    Like Paul H I like the buterfly jigs and standard leadheads. Crippled herring worked good last time. I know we caught over 35 fish last saturday between 3 people fishing.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  5. #5
    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    My dad tried one last month in PWS and I outfished him with bait. Now that I think about it, I don't think he even caught a fish on it!
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

  6. #6
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The most action I've had halibut fishing was on a delta a vendor had invited me on when they'd booked the whole boat. We ended up on a chicken patch that was actively feeding, and I'd brought my own rod and jigs. I was using a tuna stick and penn 113h, so hadn't advanced on the rod and reel end, but jigs beat the heck out of the 3# cod sinkers (peak tide out of Homer)

    Anyhow, at first I was using lead heads, but the chickens would lay on top of them to hide it from other fish, and I kept gut hooking them. The deckhand suggested I switch to a diamond jig, so that's what I did. A simple 8 oz silver jig with a single hook on the end. I'd drop it down to bottom ~150', reel up two turns, and on the second or third drop it would be fish on. I never did get a big fish, but I did release alot of fish that day, somewhere around two dozen.

    I've also used every possible combination of bait, jigs, flashers, etc in non productive areas and been skunked. Trust me, if you have several pounds of herring and herring oil in a chum tube, and soak that an hour or two each side of the tide change and nothing is biting, making a little noise down there IMHO isn't going to make a lick of difference.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  7. #7
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    The most action I've had halibut fishing was on a delta a vendor had invited me on when they'd booked the whole boat. We ended up on a chicken patch that was actively feeding, and I'd brought my own rod and jigs. I was using a tuna stick and penn 113h, so hadn't advanced on the rod and reel end, but jigs beat the heck out of the 3# cod sinkers (peak tide out of Homer)

    Anyhow, at first I was using lead heads, but the chickens would lay on top of them to hide it from other fish, and I kept gut hooking them. The deckhand suggested I switch to a diamond jig, so that's what I did. A simple 8 oz silver jig with a single hook on the end. I'd drop it down to bottom ~150', reel up two turns, and on the second or third drop it would be fish on. I never did get a big fish, but I did release alot of fish that day, somewhere around two dozen.

    I've also used every possible combination of bait, jigs, flashers, etc in non productive areas and been skunked. Trust me, if you have several pounds of herring and herring oil in a chum tube, and soak that an hour or two each side of the tide change and nothing is biting, making a little noise down there IMHO isn't going to make a lick of difference.
    I think the last paragraph of that should be quoted and pinned.

    The best luck I've had was simply chumming a lot, and having an assortment of jigs for them to hit when they sniff out the source. It's a lot of fun to be able to set the hook again on halibut...something that circle hooks take away, but it adds to the excitement. It also equals more lost fish, but hooking a 100 pounder on a semi-light jig rod is a kick.

  8. #8
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    That thing looks like a waste of money!

  9. #9

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    I was out fishing lower Cook Inlet with a bunch of friends recently and one of them was using the fish cracker lure. He did not catch a single thing on it all day. I was using my 14 wt. fly rod and out fished the entire boat, a 66 and 87 pounder, plus lots of catch and
    release

  10. #10

    Default I caught a fish on one!

    I got mine two sports shows ago. It didn't cost near what they are now asking for the things. I caught one halibut on it.

    The fishing was slow one day fairly near whittier when I went up to unsnag our chum bag that appeared to be wrapped around our anchor line. I dragged the 'But Cracker along with me to the bow and put the rod between my knees as I unsnarled the mess. The Cracker was on the bottom for quite a while on a slack line. When I reeled up on the bait I had a 60 pounder on the line! I'm sure I was fishing it with some herring and maybe a chunk of octopus.

    I fished it after that with no success. I leave it on the boat. A friend wanted to give it a try and I said if he looses it, he replaces it. He lost it. It cost him about $40!

    It really is a piece of art though... click, click, click...

  11. #11
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    I make our own 24 ounce lead jigs for about $.80 cents a piece (not counting the lead). If the fish are biting you don't even need a tail on the jig.
    If they arent biting, sit back and drink a beer and watch the whales and otters.
    Tennessee

  12. #12
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I've gotten quite a few jigs off of e-bay from the store fish in comfort. Here's a 4 pack shipped to your door for $30, and I know these catch fish.

    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    I make our own 24 ounce lead jigs for about $.80 cents a piece (not counting the lead). If the fish are biting you don't even need a tail on the jig.
    If they arent biting, sit back and drink a beer and watch the whales and otters.
    Same here. I have molds in different styles for everything from 1 oz to 32 oz, and the most expensive costs less than a buck with premium hooks and split rings. I figure $37 will buy me enough jigs to get through several seasons, even in rock piles chasing lings. Heck, $37 is about right to buy a Do-It mold and make your own. But $37 for one jig? These guys ought to go work for a bank if they want that kind of profit margin.

  14. #14
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CombatSalmon View Post
    Has anyone every tried this lure? $37 dollars is it worth it?
    What was it that P.T. Barnum said?

    Probably priced so high to make folks think it must really work since it cost so much. I mean folk by Rolexes to keep time, so you KNOW they must be accurate.

  15. #15
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Some tackle is designed to catch fish, other tackle is designed to catch fishermen.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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