Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26

Thread: Trolling for sockeye..... Bye Golly it works

  1. #1

    Default Trolling for sockeye..... Bye Golly it works

    So a few years ago I saw some fishing show where they were trolling for kokanee (basically landlocked sockeye) in washington i believe with a flasher and a red hook behind it and I thought to myself maybe this would work for sockeye up here. Unfortunetely the buskin run has really sucked till this year so i hadn't really felt like trying. This season i have done it quite a bit and man o man does it slay. Using my pontoon boat and an electric motor in the lake i am trolling with a small bannana weight with a flasher about 24 inches behind it and a bare 1/0 red gamagatsu egg hook a foot to foot and a half behind the flasher. These are no doubt about it hits similar to trolling for silvers or kings in fact i wouldn't fish past my limit of 5 as they are absolutely inhaling.

    I'm guessing if it works here it would work in most lakes so i would be intersted to know if anyone else has tried this. I know it beats the hell out of lining around crowds!!!!!!

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    4,034

    Default

    As you stated, this is a very common method in Washington when the sockeye fishing opens. Only happened a few times that I recall and created a mad dash for red hooks and flashers. In fact you couldn't buy a half nickle/half brass (bronze?) dodger ANYWHERE in western Washington the two times I recall Lake Washington opening. You might try one of those in front of your hook if you haven't. Black hooks were also popular and i'm sure some of the pink or chartruse ones Gamakatsu paints up might be interesting to try. It never occurred to me to try that here.

  3. #3
    Member Sierra Dragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    329

    Default

    I was under the impression that kokanee were typically coho or chinook? Who knew

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sierra Dragon View Post
    I was under the impression that kokanee were typically coho or chinook? Who knew
    I'd be real suspicious of whoever told you that, and anything else they told you. Kokanee are pure and simply landlocked red (sockeye) salmon. They been around a loooong time and are widely known, so your source is off by miles.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    4,034

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I'd be real suspicious of whoever told you that, and anything else they told you. Kokanee are pure and simply landlocked red (sockeye) salmon. They been around a loooong time and are widely known, so your source is off by miles.
    100% accurate, the term Kokanee is imporoperly used by about 50% of the poplulation in the areas i've lived in Idaho and Washington. Many mistakenly believe they are landlocked silvers.

  6. #6
    Member Sierra Dragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    329

    Default

    Ahhh it was far to late for me to be reading forum posts. my mistake. it was a online species guide and yes when I looked again this morning it indicated Kokanee = Sockeye

    I thought ANY landlocked salmon was termed Kokanee regardless of species since most of the landlocked salmon in Matsu are Coho or Chinook.

    got it

    I reread the first post mixing lining and trolling in the same paragraph confused me... trolling for Landlocked Salmon, which now I'm wondering why Kodiak is surprised that trolling works? Of course it works! landlocked salmon for all intent and purpose are trout/char...

    anyway...

  7. #7
    Member bigcox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Kotzebue, Alaska
    Posts
    1,397

    Default

    Any photos?
    You know your not catching any fish when you start talking about the weather...


    http://www.alaskansalmonslayers.com/

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Juneau, AK
    Posts
    216

    Default

    How would this set up do in glacial rivers and lakes with low visibility due to the silt?

    I grew up in Oregon fishing for Kokanee with flashers and a hook with a couple white corn kernels.

    Erich

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    4,034

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Erich_870 View Post
    How would this set up do in glacial rivers and lakes with low visibility due to the silt?

    I grew up in Oregon fishing for Kokanee with flashers and a hook with a couple white corn kernels.

    Erich
    I've been wondering the same thing, guess there is only one way to find out... I would think that shortening the flasher/dodger to hook leader length would help in the lower vis water.

  10. #10
    Member LungShot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    467

    Default

    This is interesting. What stage are the reds in when they are biting your hook? Are they spawning? (red color?). If so that would make sense since they would be biting out of agression. I know that landlocked reds have to change up their food source because they cannot feed in a lake like they do in an ocean. So it makes sense that they (kokanee) bite. However we all know reds (from the ocean) have no predatory instict and the only way they will bite is out of agression which you more commonly see when they begin to spawn. Or has someone finally found a way to get fresh reds to bite with consistentcy?

  11. #11
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,852

    Default

    The question I have is this: would this work in the salt?

    No more chuck and jerk snagging hooks for hatchery reds at terminal fisheries...that'd be awesome.

    Someone try this out. I don't currently have a boat....lol.

  12. #12
    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    5819'59"N 13429'49"W
    Posts
    413

    Default

    It works in the salt - that's where it came from.

    The Canadian troll fleet perfected it DECADES ago, taking up to 3 million sockeye in a single year on the slow flasher / single red hook setup.

    The trick is to get the flasher to barely "kick" through the top of its arc, right before the stall point. If you can find a way to go slow enough, then spend a little time tinkering with leader sizes (18" is a good starting point, but inches DO make a difference) and various "add-ons", you can have a pretty good day convincing sockeye to bite. If you fish a bare hook off the back of a dodger (this works too, btw), start the leader at about 10-12" and go down from there.

    Another trick used back in the day by the Ballard Ship Canal guys (and the seward park drag guys) was fishing a fluorescent orange u-20 flatfish behind a dodger...many, many sockeye met the net on that rig.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coho slayer View Post
    The question I have is this: would this work in the salt?

    No more chuck and jerk snagging hooks for hatchery reds at terminal fisheries...that'd be awesome.

    Someone try this out. I don't currently have a boat....lol.
    Haven't done it but I hear it does...
    Bare hooks or small pink hoochies I have heard....

    http://www.fishbc.com/adventure/angling/protalk/reid/sockeye.phtml
    http://www.justsportfishing.com/sock...on_tackle.html

  14. #14
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,852

    Default

    Very intriguing. There are some huge schools of reds in PWS, as most everyone knows. It'd be great to get them to bite. Gonna have to try this someday.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    230

    Default

    I'm kind of confused. Last year I asked if anyone thought it would be worth trying to fish for reds from the beach at Kenai during the dipnetting season, but down the beach past the dipnetting area. I was told "no way, they're plankton feeders, they won't take a lure or bait." And so now I'm wondering if it's possible to more or less surf cast with a flasher-and-hook or maybe a flasher-and-pixee or something like that. We're going down next week, so I guess there's no better time to give it a try....

  16. #16
    Member LungShot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    467

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bibico View Post
    I'm kind of confused. Last year I asked if anyone thought it would be worth trying to fish for reds from the beach at Kenai during the dipnetting season, but down the beach past the dipnetting area. I was told "no way, they're plankton feeders, they won't take a lure or bait." And so now I'm wondering if it's possible to more or less surf cast with a flasher-and-hook or maybe a flasher-and-pixee or something like that. We're going down next week, so I guess there's no better time to give it a try....
    Yes it is confusing. Not only that a method has been discovered to catch a plankton eating salmon via strikes but also that a flasher/bare hook set up is what works. So now the question is why? Why does that work? I guess if I was gonna try surf casting I would first make sure they were there in large numbers then I would try to rig up some sort of swivel attached to a small flasher then about a foot or more of line with a bare size 1 or 2 red hook. Of course there will need to be a good size weight on there to in order to get it out there. Please please please report back and let us know how you do and what you used. This could be the start of something and you would be a pioneer of sorts. Good luck.

  17. #17

    Default

    All the fish to this point have been chrome fish.

    The water i am fishing is very clear so i'm not sure how this technique would work in low vis water but my guess is with some tinkering it would.

    I have gone out 6 times this year and every time i have limited out on 5 fish within a few hours so it has been very consistent.

    Don't know why they are hitting so aggressively but really don't care why as much as they are. Two extra things i have noticed is that the slower the speed you are trolling the better..... u could probably get away without a motor and just oar at a decent pace...... Also have caught way more males than females

  18. #18

    Default

    As one who lives in Seattle, grew up on the waterfront at the Ballard Locks and has spent many an hour trolling gear for sockeye in both the salt and Lake Washington, here's what I have to say:

    Try this if your fishing in a lake:

    Chrome dodger, 12-18" of 60lb leader tied to a pair of red or pink 2/0 hooks. Troll slow. The more gear you have in the water, the more the sockeye are attracted to it and swim/follow your gear. You'll hammer out your limits this way.

    The heavy leader helps get the hooks swaying around with the dodger. It DOES make a difference. Don't use less then 40lb. leader.

    Glow Green Hotspot Flasher, 42" of 60lb. leader tied to a pink/glow Michael Bait, rigged with a 2/0 siwash. Troll as fast as you want. You do NOT have to troll slow with this gear. It's CRITICAL that you have at least two of these down fishing, as a solo rig just doesn't seem to get the job done. Put 2 or 3 on your downriggers, and it's stupid lights-out fishing.

    Try this if you are fishing in the salt:

    In all honesty, I've YET to catch a sockeye in the salt using either of the above mentioned techniques out in front of the Ballard Locks. The Michael Bait setup will catch kings, coho, and humpies, but no sockeyes where we are. I think it's a water and/or fish transition thing. The reason I think/know this is that this technique works extremely well in other locations. Specifically, the folks that fish off of the Fraser up in Canada just kill 'em with this Michael Bait technique out in the salt. Their only "secret" is to put as much gear off the downriggers as possible. Like 3-4 per hotspots per rigger, with one having the michael bait on it.

    I think it's "your results will vary depending on location and how snotty your sockeye are" kinda deals.

    Hopefully someone will give this a shot and post back. I don't see why it wouldn't work...especially in the lakes. Should murder them using these techniques!

  19. #19
    Member Sierra Dragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    329

    Default

    Again. landlocked sockeyes are for all intent an purpose (of angling anyway) big Trout!

    anything that works for trout/char works for kokanee. I use to do that all the time when fishing in the interior lakes of British Columbia before moving to Alaska.

    saltwater I'm not surprised it works really sockeyes in the ocean should be as aggressive as other salmon species...it's just when you have kings to fish for I doubt many try hard to get sockeyes in salt here with so many other potential targets.

  20. #20
    Member barleydog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    92

    Default

    It works in the salt - that's where it came from.

    The Canadian troll fleet perfected it DECADES ago, taking up to 3 million sockeye in a single year on the slow flasher / single red hook setup.

    The trick is to get the flasher to barely "kick" through the top of its arc, right before the stall point. If you can find a way to go slow enough, then spend a little time tinkering with leader sizes (18" is a good starting point, but inches DO make a difference) and various "add-ons", you can have a pretty good day convincing sockeye to bite. If you fish a bare hook off the back of a dodger (this works too, btw), start the leader at about 10-12" and go down from there.

    Another trick used back in the day by the Ballard Ship Canal guys (and the seward park drag guys) was fishing a fluorescent orange u-20 flatfish behind a dodger...many, many sockeye met the net on that rig.


    What G Smolt said is DEAD ON!!!! I can vouch for this, and have done it myself... Now where can we target these fish out of Valdez? I would love to give them a try "if" I knew where they would be travelling through?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •