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Thread: Shipping my own smoked salmon

  1. #1

    Default Shipping my own smoked salmon

    I have vacuum packed smoked salmon fillets that are currently refrigerated. I want to send some to my parents in the lower 48. What is the most economical way to send some fillets? Seems like it would need less cooling than fresh fish, but I'm not sure.

    Thanks,

  2. #2

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    Just about every fedex up here has ice packs specifically for shipping fish. Not sure on the price though.
    USAF Active duty. GO BEARS! GO CUBS!

  3. #3

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    Not sure if it matters, but my fish is kippered & hot smoked.

    Also, can I freeze it or will that destroy the taste?

  4. #4
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuke4u View Post
    Not sure if it matters, but my fish is kippered & hot smoked.
    Your fish is not shelf stable and must remain frozen during shipment. Clostridium botulinum is not something you want to mess with!

  5. #5

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    I'm fine with shipping by ice if I have to, just wondering a couple things:

    1) Can I freeze it at home, then do overnight shipping without ice packs?

    2) Can I keep it refrigerated, then ship priority/3 day with ice packs?

    3) Will a USPS flat rate box do or do I need some kind of special styrofoam cooler?

    4) What is the difference between my hot smoked salmon and the smoked salmon you see in the stores that are shelf stable?

    I've never shipped with dry ice before, which seems like a pain since it's hazmat.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I ship smoked salmon in priority mail flat rate containers quite often. Nobody has got hurt. I freeze it then mail it. I do use sodium nitrite cure in my brine and bring it up to temp (140 internal). I also have shipped Jerky and beer sticks same way.

  7. #7
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuke4u View Post
    I'm fine with shipping by ice if I have to, just wondering a couple things:

    1) Can I freeze it at home, then do overnight shipping without ice packs?

    2) Can I keep it refrigerated, then ship priority/3 day with ice packs?

    3) Will a USPS flat rate box do or do I need some kind of special styrofoam cooler?

    4) What is the difference between my hot smoked salmon and the smoked salmon you see in the stores that are shelf stable?

    I've never shipped with dry ice before, which seems like a pain since it's hazmat.
    Shelf stable means that the product is commercially sterile. The product is put in the vacuum sealed pouch, then run through the retort (a large pressure cooker). This is a similar process to canning salmon (or any other food) in jars. Simply vacuum sealing a product after smoking does not provide a sterile environment within the pouch, therefore unless the temperature of the product is controlled, clostridium botulinum is able to grow. This is an anaerobic bug, hence it will grow in the absence of oxygen like in vacuum sealed pouches. The retort process ensures any c-bot spores are inactivated, therefore the product is shelf stable until the pouch is opened.
    Last edited by Frostbitten; 07-12-2011 at 12:34. Reason: more info

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    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    Frostbitten..... Good information, is that from your trade that you are in? On the dry ice thing, you can mail up to five pounds by the USPS. Don't let them tell you you can't. I got into an arguement with a postal worker trying to tell me no but the Postmaster came out and said I was correct. You just need to put it in writing on the outside of your box that you will mail. Something like:"5 pounds of dry ice inside". What this does is notifies the pilot that he has dry ice on board his aircraft. They can either decline to let it board and so it might catch the next flight leaving instead. As far as I know, mine has never been bumped to a later flight. Go buy it at Fred Meyers or Carrs. Just don't let the ice touch the fish, it will burn it because it is so cold. Wrap it in a towel or something, you will be good to go.
    http://alaskadipnetting.com/

    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thewhop2000 View Post
    Frostbitten..... Good information, is that from your trade that you are in? On the dry ice thing, you can mail up to five pounds by the USPS. Don't let them tell you you can't. I got into an arguement with a postal worker trying to tell me no but the Postmaster came out and said I was correct. You just need to put it in writing on the outside of your box that you will mail. Something like:"5 pounds of dry ice inside". What this does is notifies the pilot that he has dry ice on board his aircraft. They can either decline to let it board and so it might catch the next flight leaving instead. As far as I know, mine has never been bumped to a later flight. Go buy it at Fred Meyers or Carrs. Just don't let the ice touch the fish, it will burn it because it is so cold. Wrap it in a towel or something, you will be good to go.
    Yeah, I've been around it enough to stay out of trouble I guess.

    The other thing with dry ice is that as it dissolves, it consumes oxygen which is why it can be a problem in aircraft. If pets are on board as checked baggage, and packages with dry ice are stored in the same compartment, then Fluffy may be taking a dirt nap by the time it gets to the destination.

  10. #10

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    Bad experience with USPS and smoked salmon

    3 weeks ago I sent three packages of fresh smoked salmon vac-packed via USPS priority. They still have no arrived at their destination and I don't think I have any recourse to remedy the situation.

    I have heard much better things about shipping fed-ex and I will for sure go with that next time as I am really bummed that my fish got lost in transit. Looking back I should have paid for the tracking but blew it off as I have never had anything like this happen to me before.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Armo

  11. #11
    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    Armo, Priority mail is not blessed in Alaska. They sell it but there is no promise of delivery. Go figure. If you advertize a service, honor it but uncle Sam doesn't care. Pay for two day shipping and you are good to go, go priority, hang on for the screwing you just might get. If nothing else, insure it. I value my canned smoked at 13.00 dollars a jar, with time, effort, etc. You should too.
    http://alaskadipnetting.com/

    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

  12. #12

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    whop,

    Thanks for the advice and, I realize that now but the post office that I am forced to go through (Denali) doesn't even offer 2 day shipping. I am crushed it didn't go through as it was for a lady friend who was really looking forward to getting it.

    I guess its just one of those lessons you learn the hard way and I hope nuke has a better experience based on the advice hes gotten here. I know I have learned quite a bit just from these couple posts.

  13. #13
    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    Armo, Express is the only way to go with frozen stuff. Priority is for canned stuff, INSURED!!!! They sell it but again, don't honor it up here. Sorry to hear about your recent loss. I learned that the hard way too. I sent stuff to Kodiak and it got lost on the docks. Salmon, Halibut, steaks and NY lobster. Thank God I insured it, lost over 400 dollars worth of great eating stuff. Never again w/o insurance.
    http://alaskadipnetting.com/

    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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    You got into an argument with a postal worker? You really like living dangerously, don't ya?

  15. #15

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    typically the post office insures up to 100 dollars right off the bat. Unless Im thinking of ups. I might be but a quick check wouldnt hurt.
    USAF Active duty. GO BEARS! GO CUBS!

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    Yeah, I've been around it enough to stay out of trouble I guess.

    The other thing with dry ice is that as it dissolves, it consumes oxygen which is why it can be a problem in aircraft. If pets are on board as checked baggage, and packages with dry ice are stored in the same compartment, then Fluffy may be taking a dirt nap by the time it gets to the destination.
    Love the "dirt nap" reference. But I also wanted to add that another reason dry ice must be declared is so that it is shipped in a part of the aircraft where it can suck out the oxygen without setting off a fire alarm.

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