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Thread: Best way to eat kings

  1. #1
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    Default Best way to eat kings

    Last year I caught a 25lb king and I filleted it up and grilled it just like I do my reds. Maybe its just me but I kinda preferred the red to the king. So I would like to hear some opinions, what do most folks do with their kings?

    Grill, smoke or can?

    Recipies are welcome if youre willing to share.


    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I smoke all of mine

  3. #3
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Where/when did you catch it? Did it have any color to it? Over the past year I've been exposed to winter/feeder kings caught in the salt, and I'm a believer. Just tonight I had some white and some red kings from the winter troll fishery, and I don't know that a finer salmon exists. That being said, kings that are starting to blush (turn pink or red) in the rivers are not nearly the quality of their saltwater brethren, and a red dipped at the mouth of the river or even caught upriver many miles but only a few days out of the ocean is better eating than a king that has been in the freshwater a while. Time in the river matters more than species, in my experience. If it's caught in the salt or is still dime bright, I like the seasoning to be very light to accentuate the flavor of the fish. If the king has been in river a while and is turning color, though, LuJon's suggestion of smoking is spot on.

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    I like kings the best since they are more oily and like I silvers next. Reds to me are too dry but smoke up well and fast.I put olive oil on my fillet and some mrs dash and some sea salt and grill it on a water soaked cedar plank. Some people like dill and lemons and onions on theirs. Another favorite is marinade in half olive oil and half soy sauce and then add some chef Paul perdonnes salmon shake and a little lemon pepper and grill for 2-3 mins per side in the grill with no plank. Salmon should be juicy And not dry after cooking.

  5. #5

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    I grill smoke mine. I do a salt/brown sugar brine over night, then briefly rinse it off when I am done. Skin is still on one side. Get the grill pretty hot, then dump a lot of wood chips on the grill. I put the fish on, then keep putting wood chips on occasionally until the fish is ready. I lift the fillets off the skin, flip em and scrape the lateral line off, then eat with a little butter on top. You still get the smoky flavor without the wait of a smoker.

  6. #6
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    I caught the fish in late july last year on the Klutina, so yea it was pretty red, the meat was firm but almost white.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Where/when did you catch it? Did it have any color to it? Over the past year I've been exposed to winter/feeder kings caught in the salt, and I'm a believer. Just tonight I had some white and some red kings from the winter troll fishery, and I don't know that a finer salmon exists. That being said, kings that are starting to blush (turn pink or red) in the rivers are not nearly the quality of their saltwater brethren, and a red dipped at the mouth of the river or even caught upriver many miles but only a few days out of the ocean is better eating than a king that has been in the freshwater a while. Time in the river matters more than species, in my experience. If it's caught in the salt or is still dime bright, I like the seasoning to be very light to accentuate the flavor of the fish. If the king has been in river a while and is turning color, though, LuJon's suggestion of smoking is spot on.

  7. #7
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    I'm in SE, so the kings we get are still in the ocean & shiney bright & firm. I almost always use a cedar plank- you get that smoky smell/taste. I soak my planks first & usually use fillets washed & patted a bit. Sprinkle on a bit of lemon pepper & we started using Mae Ploy (sweet chili sauce) & BARELY cooking it on the grill. I mean AS SOON as the fattest part is no longerjelly-ish I pull it off onto a cookie sheet. It just melts in your mouth! We've used raspberry jam & orange marmelade & that was tasty, but I gotta tell you that sweet chili sauce is SO good. Sweet, but with a bit of a kicker. I buy it in the 'asian section' of the grocer.

  8. #8
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    Cut up in steaks. Set up on tin foil, brushed with an olive oil/soy sauce, seasoned with a special salmon seasoning, with shallots, green onions, and a few chopped garlic. Throw it on my pellet smoker on smoke for about 30 minutes at 110* then 425 until done. Alder/pecan wood. Perfect every time.


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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jobobarcher View Post
    I caught the fish in late july last year on the Klutina, so yea it was pretty red, the meat was firm but almost white.
    That's your problem. They're still worth eating at that point, but smoking might be a better option. If you get a chance, try a silver-sided king out of the salt. They're a totally different creature.

    As for recipes, one of my favorites is to mix equal parts (approx. 1/3 cup each) of melted butter, whiskey or tequila, and lime juice with a lot of minced garlic. Douse the skinned fillet on top and on bottom while grilling it on a soaked cedar plank. Good, good stuff.

  10. #10

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    Look in the oriental section of the grocery store for s sweet chili sauce called Mae Ploy, I like to marinate a large king fillet (enough for 2 adults) in the sauce with a little diced green onion, garlic and fresh ground pepper for about 2-4 hours. Then cook it on a HOT grill meat side down for about 1.5-2 minutes to carmalize the sugars in the chili sauce then flip and cook skinside down for a few minutes until done. Works for big reds too but you've got to work quick before it overcooks or falls apart.

    The sauce is also great for dipping deep fried halibut in.

  11. #11

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    This recipe was a hit with the out of state visitors last year. I even surprised myself with this marinade, it was quite tasty.

    Soy sauce
    Olive oil or sesame oil
    Squeezed lime
    Fresh minced Ginger
    Fresh minced garlic
    Fresh cilantro
    Salt
    pepper

    After marinating for a day throw the fillet slab on a cedar plank and grill until flaky.

  12. #12
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    With a cooooled beer and people you love

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