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Thread: What to do with the fish when dipnetting from a boat

  1. #1
    Member snowbunny's Avatar
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    Default What to do with the fish when dipnetting from a boat

    This might be a somewhat silly question, but this year will be my first dipnetting from a boat (have always done it from shore). I'm hoping we get slammed with an absolute phenomenal amount of fish ...so if that's the case, what is the best way to handle the fish on a boat? Clip the tails and throw them in a giant cooler and take care of them when we reach shore? Or take whatever time we may have to properly care for them, then throw them in the cooler? I always bleed them out, but always bleed them in the water (read somewhere a few years back that it keeps from clotting...don't know....but I took it as a sound suggestion and ran with it). Maybe a trash can full of water to bleed them out, then throw them in the cooler (might make for some nasty trash water, but if it helps, it's worth it). Any suggestions is greatly appreciated!

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    Look carefully at the permit info. a blue sheet of paper handed out with permit here in Homer specifically says all dip fish from a boat must be clipped and recorded before leaving the open fishing area. I take this to mean a. before leaving the river dip area. and b. before hitting the ramp to take your boat out. We have a person clipping as we catch them and also popping a gill. then put in totes. does make for a messy boat at times. using car wash pressure hose does the cleanup trick.
    Last edited by glacierbear; 07-11-2011 at 15:32. Reason: additional

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Yes as Glacierbear said it is nice to have a helper in the boat to deal with the fish. If not the dippers in our do it themselves. We rip a gill and put them in to a cooler then clip fins before heading into the ramp.Never had any problems with quality of our fish.
    Also for your own safety it is wise if the boat driver does not dip or handle any fish or gear but concentrate on not hitting anyone or anything with the boat.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    We rigged up a line that runs along the boat from bow to stern with a caribeaner (sp?) on each end. The dippers just flop the fish in the boat (we don't use the gill net webbing) and another hand runs the line through their gills like a stringer on the bow, clips it back to the boat, cuts their gills then hangs them over the side. They simply move to the stern with the current while they bleed out. As we finish the drift, unclip the line at the stern and take the bled fish off and move them to the cooler or rubber trash can then head back upstream to do it again.

    This technique works well if the fishing is average and we pick up a modest number of fish per drift (<15). If it is hot and heavy, it's a little tougher to keep up.
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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by glacierbear View Post
    Look carefully at the permit info. a blue sheet of paper handed out with permit here in Homer specifically says all dip fish from a boat must be clipped and recorded before leaving the open fishing area. I take this to mean a. before leaving the river dip area. and b. before hitting the ramp to take your boat out. We have a person clipping as we catch them and also popping a gill. then put in totes. does make for a messy boat at times. using car wash pressure hose does the cleanup trick.
    should perhaps read that permit in greater detail. "TIPS OF TAILS MUST BE REMOVED AND SALMON HARVEST MUST BE RECORDED PRIOR TO LEAVING FISHING SITE OR CONCEALING FROM VIEW" (all caps as printed on permit) sounds like your folks are doing correctly, however you did not mention the critical part that wins a lot of tickets.
    squab (probably of Scandinavian descent; skvabb, meaning "loose, fat flesh") is a young domestic pigeon or its meat

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    I seen some guys not clipping their fish as they threw them into the cooler and f&g niked them for it. They need clipped before putting them up to avoid any arguements or fines. Kitchen shears work great for clipping fins
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    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    ............
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    Now that this is working again......... This is what I do. I bring plenty of coolers and ice. I have a big cooler w/o a lid. You can also use a big garbage can. Net a fish, bonk, rip a gill and toss in cooler/can. Add ice as needed. As it gets full or heavy, transfer fish to a fresh cooler, after clipping their tails. Re-ice and close lid.
    Once done for the day, anchor off the dock @ 100 feet and count/seperate fish for all parties, re-ice and record amount of fish.
    Then you are ready to go join the circus called the city dock.
    For all our sakes, please don't dally on loading up your boat onto the trailer and getting out of the way for the next guy. Anything needing done can be at the top of the launch. Plenty of room to pull aside and prep for the ride home.
    I don't fillet my fish till I get home. I just don't like sand/muck with my fish!!!
    Say hello to Andy at the launch, he is the assistant harbor master. The harbor master takes leave and runs off during dipping and leaves Andy to handle it. Kind of a big guy, missing a few teeth but a real sweetheart. I bring him donuts and he cuts me a lot of slack!!!
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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    Default uh oh....

    Quote Originally Posted by thewhop2000 View Post
    missing a few teeth but a real sweetheart. I bring him donuts and he cuts me a lot of slack!!!
    U sure SCADA isn't going to get hit up for a big dental bill?

    Just kidding, whop. Great advice you gave, every bit of it (well, maybe except about the doughnuts....)

  10. #10

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    As most people have said, taking the time to bleed them with either your scissors or ripped gills is mandatory for quality meat. Then be sure to clip those tails before setting them down. Get some quality shears/scissors that are super sharp or else you'll spend several minutes knawing on the tails. I used to be a cooler guy, but the darn lid is such a hassle when the fish are running strong. My favorite is the giant Rubbermaid tub. Unless you need an extra seat on your boat from the cooler lid, I recommend the tub because it's super fast. It also looks cool when you have so many fish in the boat that the sides of the Rubbermaid tub start buldging out

  11. #11

    Default Preferred Use of Cooler Lid

    Quote Originally Posted by kbskinny11 View Post
    ...the darn lid is such a hassle when the fish are running strong...
    Who's got room for a cooler?






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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    When I dip from my boat, I drive and also keep the tally. Fish are removed from the net, we keep a large cutting board on the floor and use a hatchet to cut the tails, cut the gills and then head down into a round tote. Once they have bled out and the tote is full they go into a fish bag with ice. Repeat until we catch a limit or we reach our physical limit.

    Fish bag is similar to this one. Bought it in Hawaii in 1992, to keep tuna and marlin iced down. Holds ice for a long time and I have used it for everything from fish to moose quarters.

    http://www.alltackle.com/canyon_fish_bags.htm

    The first year I dipped from my boat, a red somehow found its way under the floor boards and into the bilge. This was in June, kept smelling a foul stench and and thought it was from the blood that founds its way onto the floor.

    Was King fishing in July and dropped a lure on the floor and it rolled into the bilge, as I reached in to feel for the lure I instead got a hand full of a rotten red. OMG, was that nasty, glad the fish cops did not find it and think I was trying to hide an extra one.

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    I am about to purchase a net for my boat. What length handle should I get?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamason View Post
    I am about to purchase a net for my boat. What length handle should I get?
    6 foot works well. BnJ's sells the 6ft blue aluminum pole sections, add a D-handle or T-handle, and a Backsaver handle and you'll be good. Or if you're going with a Mike's Welding net, I think he sells the 6ft handle for his boat nets too.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    One tip I will share about dipping from a boat. Tie a section of rope to your net with a small float, this will often save you from loosing your net. We lost two nets to the copper in one trip when they got caught on something underwater, we went from 3 dippers to one in a matter of minutes. When you are drifting on the copper things happen quick, with the rope and float we have been able to get a couple nets free.

    Steve
    Last edited by stid2677; 07-12-2011 at 13:49.
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    Member snowbunny's Avatar
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    Thank you everyone for the advice...extremely great ideas in this thread!

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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    One tip I will share about dipping from a boat. Tie a section of rope to your net with a small float, this will often save you from loosing your net. We lost two nets to the copper in one trip when they got caught on something underwater, we went from 3 dippers to one in a matter of minutes. When you are drifting on the copper things happen quick, with the rope and float we have been able to get a couple nets free.

    Steve
    I had to laugh a little last year when during one run I saw a dipnet hanging on (as if it had netted) about a 2-3 foot large bouy. Next run thru it was gone. Somebody wasn't watching where they were going I figure..... otherwise known as: "I gotta King!"

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