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Thread: What is a "DAYPACK".....???

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    Default What is a "DAYPACK".....???

    What is a daypack ? I thought I knew for sure, and now for sure, I truely don't know. I must have more than 20+ packs, including an original "Trapper Nelson" (Which looks like a daypack).

    Clearly cell phones and "SPOT" locator's have changed the amount of survival gear most carry. I have neither phone or SPOT, and nearly 100% of my daily hikes are alone, and off trail. So I feel I need a lot of survival gear just for a 6 hour walk.

    After careful assessment, my basic (Must Have) gear is 1,600 cubic inches. So I need 2,000 c.i. just to have room for a jacket & gloves. Some how this does not seem like a daypack.

    So what defines a "Daypack" for you......No belt, a bookbag, no suspension system, 1,200 c.i. or less, What.....?

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    It really depends on what support I have and how far I am going in a day. My eberlestock pack is a perfect wheeler/sled rig. It hauls all my game bags and butchering gear along with a spare jacket and food + I can carry back loins and straps as a first load. I keep a pack frame on the wheeler. For longer jaunts with no mechanized support my McHale pack without any pockets or lid compresses small to steady light loads but will easily open up and swallow a black bear (meat/hide/skull) or Griz hide. I also have a couple ultralight packs that will carry my camping gear for a 3-5 day hike with no plans for harvesting an animal.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Depends on what I'm doing... the daypack I use the most is a Mystery Ranch Dragonslayer. It is certainly on the larger side of daypacks at 2600ci but it compresses pretty flat when I don't need the room. I use it in winter while skiing, for hunting, for hiking. Pretty much all the time unless I'm actually backpacking for a multi day trip...often I'm playing "Dad Sherpa" so I've got everyone's gear, not just mine- but no matter, it works fine all the same.

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    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    What is a daypack ? I thought I knew for sure, and now for sure, I truely don't know. I must have more than 20+ packs, including an original "Trapper Nelson" (Which looks like a daypack).

    Clearly cell phones and "SPOT" locator's have changed the amount of survival gear most carry. I have neither phone or SPOT, and nearly 100% of my daily hikes are alone, and off trail. So I feel I need a lot of survival gear just for a 6 hour walk.

    After careful assessment, my basic (Must Have) gear is 1,600 cubic inches. So I need 2,000 c.i. just to have room for a jacket & gloves. Some how this does not seem like a daypack.

    So what defines a "Daypack" for you......No belt, a bookbag, no suspension system, 1,200 c.i. or less, What.....?
    Mine is an old Camelbak in the 1500ci range. It's got a sternum strap and a hip strap, which I like. In my case I have both a cell phone and a PLB and must say it hasn't changed anything about the way I pack- like you I hike alone and carry survival gear just in case. I pack and make my hiking decisions as though I have no way to contact anyone for help, because my PLB and phone aren't my plan B or even a plan C- they are for real emergencies only. I do think you're right that it has impacted how people pack when they have a SPOT or PLB or even just a phone...and I think some people also push the envelope a little further.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by EagleRiverDee View Post
    Mine is an old Camelbak in the 1500ci range. It's got a sternum strap and a hip strap, which I like. In my case I have both a cell phone and a PLB and must say it hasn't changed anything about the way I pack- like you I hike alone and carry survival gear just in case. I pack and make my hiking decisions as though I have no way to contact anyone for help, because my PLB and phone aren't my plan B or even a plan C- they are for real emergencies only. I do think you're right that it has impacted how people pack when they have a SPOT or PLB or even just a phone...and I think some people also push the envelope a little further.
    Thanks, I sent you a PM about PLB vs. SPOT thingies.

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    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
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    well since this is a personal opinion...heres mine...

    I think there are two ways to look at a day pack. One is industry standard which seems to put day packs somewhere in the just under a 1000 cubic inch to 2500 category.

    Then theres my standard, the how much do I need to carry because of the weather/possibilities category. For Alaska we could go a little higher than the rest of the nation in whats considered day pack size during some parts of the year.

    I like to carry whats considered daypacks by many for lengthy trips during the summer. my 1600-2200 ci packs become my backpacks. I can do a five day trip with that size of pack with ultralight gear.

    But when the weather drops in the fall and I need more insulation what was a five day pack turns sharply into a one day pack as the gear size in it increases.

    So, a day pack can vary widely in size dependent on need.

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    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    This is an old thread, but I felt like chiming in.

    My idea of a daypack has changed from what I used to believe, primarily because the advances in materials have caused things to become lighter, and more compactable.

    Like AGL4Now, I tend to pack for worst case scenarios. Last year I bought a 2400 Cu In Go-Lite pack (2 lbs) with the intent that it would become my day pack, but due to the fact that recent gear purchases of mine are lighter and less bulky, it's going to become my multi-day pack (short trips of up to a few days). My daypack is now my old Camelbak (approx 1400 Cu In) and I toss in my PSK, FAK, an emergency bivy, water, food, and a titanium cup (in case I need to boil water). There's room in the pack left over. I feel comfortable I could overnight with the gear I have. I also carry a phone and a personal locator beacon, but those items do not change how I pack. I carry more on a day hike than most folks I know with the intent that if I had to bivy I could. Not comfortably, but if I were going camping I'd pack differently anyway.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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