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Thread: Light: Yet strong "Day Pack" recommendations

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    Default Light: Yet strong "Day Pack" recommendations

    Golite is out of nearly everything till December. I am looking for a high quality day pack in the 800 to 1,200 ci size. Ideas/recommendations.....?

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Golite is out of nearly everything till December. I am looking for a high quality day pack in the 800 to 1,200 ci size. Ideas/recommendations.....?
    Look at the Kifaru Ultralight line, the E&E is 1000ci and weights 9.5 ozs empty. They have bigger, so you can go up from there, plus they don't absorb water and get heavier.

    I have a KU5200 and the E&E. Been very happy with their gear.

    http://www.kifaru.net/KUEE.html


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    Default CamelBak HAWG

    I had an epiphany recently and realized that I don't need to carry such a heavy daypack around. So, this summer I have been using a CamelBak HAWG which weighs in a 2.5 lbs @1220ci. I really like it. The PALS webbing makes the pack customizable. I don't use the water reservoir very often. Instead, I use a 32oz Nalgene snuggled inside a 511 H2oCarrier attached to the outside. The HAWG probably doesn't fit the definition of ultralight, but it's a good compromise between weight and toughness.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I have a granite gear vapor that all but disappears on your back. It will ride 30-40lbs. It is a new pack for me but Alaska_lanche has been using it extensively for packrafting. I also have a feather light pack from golite for the wife. I don't think either one ways much more (if even) a pound. Those UL backpackers know how to trim the fat!!

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Mystery Ranch's Streetfighter.... 1000ci. @ 2lbs. Made in USA.

    There are lighter daypacks but none tougher or better made.

    Also consider Sealine drybag packs depending on your specific needs regarding waterproofing. 35L is a shade over a pound and waterproof- also made in USA.

  6. #6

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    The North Face Verto 26 Summit Series hands down. 1600 worth of volume, compresses into the size of a pbj sandwich, weighs 10 oz, has 2 ice axe/tool carriers, and the list goes on. I have take it through pretty tough bushwhacking without a scratch. I have several packs and this is my favorite. Large enough for an overnighter and compresses small enough for light fast trail runs.

    Best of all, 69.00.

    http://www.rei.com/product/810835/th...-verto-26-pack

  7. #7

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    Given your volume limitations I'd say this is a bit more volume than you wanted but for $75 and only 21 oz for 2000 cu in its a pretty good deal.

    http://www.golite.com/Product/ProdDe...10&mc=&t=&lat=

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    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Golite is out of nearly everything till December. I am looking for a high quality day pack in the 800 to 1,200 ci size. Ideas/recommendations.....?
    There are lots of good daypacks out there, but I am currently using

    Golite Rush 900 ci http://www.golite.com/Product/prodde...x?p=PA5253&s=1

    Golite VO24 1500 ci http://www.golite.com/product/prodde...x?p=PA5254&s=1

    Note these links are for the old style models, which are what I have, and are listed a bit higher in cubic inch capacity than the newer ones for some reason. The Rush is more of a mountain bikers pack but since my gear is pretty small I use it as a hiking daypack too. I have used the VO24 on multiple day trips as a backpack and it did ok.

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    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
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    a while back i researched a pack i think i would like to own. the vapor day by GG. its a little bit larger than what you speced out since its 2000 ci, but i think this would be a nice pack to add to the arsenal.

    http://www.granitegearstore.com/Vapor-Day-P115C29.aspx

  10. #10

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    Please forgive me, I guess I was in a state of wish-full thinking. Hoping I could cull day hike gear to 1,200 c.i.

    Clearly cell phones and "SPOT" locator's have changed the amount of survival gear most carry. I have neither phone or SPOT, and nearly 100% of my daily hikes are alone, and off trail. So I feel I need a lot of survival gear just for a 6 hour walk.

    After careful assessment, my basic (Must Have) gear is 1,600 cubic inches. So I need 2,000 c.i. just to have room for a jacket & gloves.

    I have been using a Infinity Lancer 55 (about 3,300 c.i.) as a daypack, and was hoping to go much smaller.

  11. #11
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    What gear are you packing? There may be room to trim some fat.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    What gear are you packing? There may be room to trim some fat.
    Sleeping Bag: polyester fill: 2 lb. 4 oz.

    8'X12' sheet of 6 mill visqueen (to be replaced by Golite SL3)

    Redundant fire starting systems. (They are very small and light)

    Fresh socks.

    spare shoe laces and light twine.

    knife (In the winter also a saw)

    Large amount of First Aid stuff.

    watch cap and light leather gloves (for sharp rock encounters)

    Pop-Tarts & candy bar type stuff, bullion cubes, a 2-cups of minute rice. and stainless steel cup.

    Roll-up sun glass's

    copper wire.

    This list is just from memory. Could I get by with nothing/no pack.......yes. But the issue is if I have a compound fracture and have to crawl out, I'll wish I had survival/first aid gear. The key to remember is NO ONE knows where I went, or even that I went, and I avoid trails, and I am alone. The easy answer for me to reduce survival gear is a cell phone or SPOT thingie. Also about once a year, I seem to find myself too far out and to exausted to get back to the starting point, and have to overnight it.

  13. #13
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Sleeping Bag: polyester fill: 2 lb. 4 oz.

    8'X12' sheet of 6 mill visqueen (to be replaced by Golite SL3)

    Redundant fire starting systems. (They are very small and light)

    Fresh socks.

    spare shoe laces and light twine.

    knife (In the winter also a saw)

    Large amount of First Aid stuff.

    watch cap and light leather gloves (for sharp rock encounters)

    Pop-Tarts & candy bar type stuff, bullion cubes, a 2-cups of minute rice. and stainless steel cup.

    Roll-up sun glass's

    copper wire.

    This list is just from memory. Could I get by with nothing/no pack.......yes. But the issue is if I have a compound fracture and have to crawl out, I'll wish I had survival/first aid gear. The key to remember is NO ONE knows where I went, or even that I went, and I avoid trails, and I am alone. The easy answer for me to reduce survival gear is a cell phone or SPOT thingie. Also about once a year, I seem to find myself too far out and to exausted to get back to the starting point, and have to overnight it.
    I am curious what first aid gear you take. Many items in most kits can be fabricated from items you already have. Sure one of those flexible splints and a cravat would be nice to have if you needed them but a spare shirt and a stick or a plastic or foam frame liner from your pack would suffice. I bet you could find all sorts of items that you could make from what you would normally cary. Heck a piece of duck tape around your water bottle and the foil from a mountain house meal coule easily be used to treat something as crazy as a sucking chest wound. Perhaps look into a self aid and buddy care class. It is mandatory for military deployers and will open your eyes to techniques for using what you have to treat a chrisis.

    Also given your location a pen flare may work wonders. There are quite a bit of planes running around there that could radio in a problem.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I am curious what first aid gear you take.
    It is about the size of a 1/2 loaf of bread. Everything up to suture kit & 6" field bandage. The point is do I need it day after day........NO, but it exists for safety. If I need an "Ace" bandage real bad, will I be sad that I deleted it to save space.......Yes.

    I think I'll keep the gear at 1,600 c.i. and just drop down from a 3,300 c.i. pack to half that size. Thinking now along this line: http://www.backcountry.com/lowe-alpi...pack-1600cu-in

    Note: I like a tall yet narrow pack for protection of the neck area in case of a fall or protracted nibbling by brown fuzzy's.

  15. #15

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    I just weighed the current pack and it is 18.5 pounds, including a windbreaker jacket.

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