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Thread: Bayliner Trophy any good?

  1. #1
    Member ksbha4's Avatar
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    Default Bayliner Trophy any good?

    Hey guys,
    In reading the past forums and talking with other boaters, I understand the general feeling about Bayliner boats but my pocketbook can't afford an Osprey just yet! Having said that, I have heard that the Trophy models are a little better in regards to hull strength and integrity. I am considerning an 88' Bayliner Trophy on Craigslist that from the pics, appears to be a pretty nice boat. In your opinions, IF I were to buy a Trophy, am I getting a better boat than the regular bayliner sedan models? This one comes with an OMC motor and does not list the outdrive model.
    Ask not what your government can do for you. Ask how your government can go away and get out of your life

  2. #2
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Wow- 88 feet is a lot of boat!

    The Trophy is a good hull, but always inspect every square inch before buying used!!!
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  3. #3

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    While I don't know if I am remembering it completely right, the 80's were a time before Trophy really separated themselves from Bayliner and they were really just a trim package more than a truly different boat. While it has been years that I had my 24 foot Bayliner, it wasn't a bad boat, nor was it a great boat, but it did serve me well at the time. It had a good ride, was spacious, heavy as hell, and burned lots of gas. There are lots of them on the water that are 30 plus years old and while Bayliner gets a bad rap sometimes, I don't feel they are a bad brand - just be careful as you would when buying anything.

  4. #4
    Member ocnfish's Avatar
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    I think the early ones were a semi displacement hull (could be wrong) if so they will be underpowered and slow. There are a lot of Bayliners on the water and it has always been the low dollary of getting out on the water.

    good luck

  5. #5
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    OMC Corbra outdrive parts can be a real PIA to find. I just did one and it took 6 weeks to get all the parts needed. Any internal repairs requires the use of very specialized tools, which also are hard to come by.

    The only shop that was doing any work with them was Odie's Marine and even he turns many away as some parts are just not readily available and the units windup in his way for long periods of time waiting for parts if he can find them. I work on them occasionally and Odie has been gracious enough to let me borrow, for a price, the special tools required. I will tell you most of my time is spent searching for parts and time is money.

  6. #6

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    I had the OMC Cobra and had to replace it. I also had to replace the risers and the manifolds. But hey, it was 1997 and I was able to find used stuff pretty easily. I guess they are getting hard to find now. As you noted, this is something to consider.

  7. #7
    Member ksbha4's Avatar
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    Thanks guys for the input. I'll probably hold off since what I'd really rather prefer is a boat with a diesel engine. I think that's a better way to go.
    Ask not what your government can do for you. Ask how your government can go away and get out of your life

  8. #8

    Default Diesel???

    If you can find a diesel powered boat that anyone of average income can afford it's probably junk or sunk. Diesel boats that are in good sea-worthy shape can cost a fortune!

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    If you can find a diesel powered boat that anyone of average income can afford it's probably junk or sunk. Diesel boats that are in good sea-worthy shape can cost a fortune!
    It's hard to argue that. Diesel boats are great and expensive. This is especially true if they are twin screws.....Maybe one will fall out of the sky......But not for the OP, but for me....

  10. #10
    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    If you can find a diesel powered boat that anyone of average income can afford it's probably junk or sunk. Diesel boats that are in good sea-worthy shape can cost a fortune!
    I wanted to repower my boat with twin diesels, but just can't afford it. I bought the boat and repowered with twin 350's for just a little more than one new yanmar engine costs
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

  11. #11
    Member IceKing02's Avatar
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    Look on Craig's List in the boating section. There is a 2359 Trophy with a Cummins diesel package.
    So far I love my diesel and am willing to do the extra maintenance that is required to keep it in good condition. Yes, it is expensive. I don't know about the Cummins diesel however my Volvo-Penta has none of the nasty diesel fumes of older diesels. And I'd imagine that Trophy has plenty of punch to put you on step without wallowing along, trying to put a full load up on top of the water...

  12. #12

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    There is nothing wrong with Bayliner for the money, I have one. You need to pick a mount of money you will spend and look, bang for the buck. Sure heavy fiberglass over aluminum issue. But it boils down to dollars want to dump 100k+ or like me in for 15k. You pick

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