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Thread: Bowhunting Proficiency Test

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Default Bowhunting Proficiency Test

    Does anyone know the shooting scenario for Alaska'a bowhunting proficiency exam (distances and targets, raised or level)?

    Thanks

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Here is what they have at the web site but looking for more specifics:

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...ered.fdbowreqs

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    When I took it in Fairbanks several years ago,, it was 5 targets I believe, had to hit in the kill zone of at least 3 of the 5. Nothing over 30 yards and one from 12ft high or so platform. They had life sized game targets in the woods and you could use a range finder if you brought one, but could not borough one from someone else.

    This is from my memory and I do have CRS (can't remember stuff)

    If you can shoot no problem,,we had about a 50% failure rate. Some people get performance anxiety.

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Sounds like what is at the web site, thanks. "The student must make five out of the eight shots in the vitals or “kill zone” (heart, lung, liver). The student must make at least one vital shot on each of the four target animals and a double kill on one."

    I was mostly wondering about range, but sounds like a 20,30 and 40 pin.

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    Member blasterak's Avatar
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    When I took it a few years back the longest shot was 28yds on a sheep target. We did do a slightly elevated shot, it was from the top of a walk path down to a ditch, 10yd shot. It was a easy shoot, I think most everybody in the group passed.

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    When I took mine it was 4 targets, 2 shots per target. One standing one kneeling. To pass you had to have five of the eight shots in the vitals. I did not have a range finder but I do not think that any of the shots were much over 25 yards.

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    My experience is the same as akdd's. 4 targerts, eights shots. If you practice, its not difficult. We had one failure, lady missed the first target both times, I mean completely missed. Farthest was probably 30 yards. Down hill was to a black bear, about 20 yards. But like I stated, if you practice, its not difficult.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Even if you miss the first target twice, I will let a student shoot the course again. Nerves gets a lot of people. Depending on class size, most instructors will allow at least one reshoot if there is time.
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    I just took the course the other day, there is about an hour in the classroom and then a 5 target 3d shoot no further than 30yds. You can use a range finder for yourself but cannot give that out to the other shooters. There is an elevated target that you will shoot as well that will be from the top of the hill shooting down at the target.

    It is an easy shoot if you practice a bit. If you miss two kills in one target you are done on the shoot. You can miss one vital not to exceed three misses on three targets.

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    Although passing the course, the kill zone on one critter was higher than I had anticipated. Fortunately, one of my arrows was reasonably placed to the instructor's satisfaction.

    Generally thinking that a good set of binoculars would have helped (in those low light conditions) in seeing the kill zones marked on the target, and my arrows on that critter would have been slightly higher.

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    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
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    When I took my bow shoot test... it was five targets, two shots each. No more than two misses- period. The Bear target was shot from the back porch of Cramer's milk house by Fish and Game here in Fairbanks. That was about 15 feet up, shooting about 18 yards out. The longest shot was on a lifesized elk target at 35 Yards. The other three were deer targets from 20 to 25 yards. The only person using a range finder was a stick bow shooter, who had no sights, no grip, and hand made arrows. He shot 100%! I have to admit to sailing one clean over the back of the midsized deer target, when I misjudged the distance. Even lost my arrow.

    If you practice at all you will do fine. Just settle down and enjoy the extra target time!

    Good hunting.
    Chris

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    I thought it was too easy. 28 yds was longest shot on a caribou. There were people in my group that passed the test but I don't think they were ready to hunt. There was one guy that had blown almost every first shot, gut, thigh,rump, you name it, and still passed somehow. Hopefully they went home and practiced ALOT before flinging arrows at little spike moose in their yard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wet eNuf View Post
    Although passing the course, the kill zone on one critter was higher than I had anticipated. Fortunately, one of my arrows was reasonably placed to the instructor's satisfaction.

    Generally thinking that a good set of binoculars would have helped (in those low light conditions) in seeing the kill zones marked on the target, and my arrows on that critter would have been slightly higher.
    I am actually a little surprised they don't list binos as being disallowed for just the reason you stated. They are trying to simulate field conditions and, in the field, a deer or bear won't have a nice circle drawn on it's side inidcating the kill zone. That is something the shooter should know in reference to the animal's body. I know when I did the proficiency shoot for a Ft. Rich moose permit, they made a point to NOT let you get your arrows from the first targets because they didn't want you to see what the kill zone they were judging by was until after you were done shooting all animals. They wouldn't even tell you if your first shots were good or not until you were done so you couldn't "learn" from what they say during the shoot.

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    Default hunter ed. students should be respectful to their instructors, and virtually all are

    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Even if you miss the first target twice, I will let a student shoot the course again. Nerves gets a lot of people. Depending on class size, most instructors will allow at least one reshoot if there is time.
    I'd qualify that re-shoot stmt, to say that virtually all instructors will allow at least one re-shoot, provided that student has been respectful, attentive, and not a distraction to others during the class.

    In my experience, 99.9 per cent of all students do fit in this category.

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    I was just relooking at these posts and the different standards for different areas and how the "minimums" have changed since I qualified back in 1994. I believe I would have to thank the large group of instructors for keeping it different and real between classes, so people won't "pass on yardages and target sizes" info to their buddies.

    (Instructors) So thanks for volunteering your time and effort for the future of hunting from us hunters.

    Chris

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    The instructors I had in Soldotna were looking for the arrow having a path through the vitals. They weren't scoring the rings on the target.

    If you shoot any 3D, the shooting test is the bunny hill version of a regular 30 target course.

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