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Thread: anchoring inflatable boat

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    Member akhunter83's Avatar
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    Default anchoring inflatable boat

    Took my new 14ft Saturn inflatable boat out of deep creek last weekend for halibut, launched off the beach and went out about 4 miles, picked up 1 halibut after a few hours of fishings and had several more bits. Once we found a spot with fish we would motor past and drift over it again, we did that multiple times. Seems if we had an anchor we would have done better, cause we could of stayed on top of the fish. Anyone have some recommendations for an anchor suitable for a 14ft infaltable? How much line should i attach to the anchor, we fished in about 80-100 ft? Also, do you just attach the anchor line to the D-ring on the dow? Thanks

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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Any anchor will work. A bag full or rocks. A lead pyramid anchor. An old heavy chain wired together. Anything. But.....
    ....but, be capable of cutting away from the anchor line fast in case of any unexpected emergency.

    Alaska True Adventure

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Couple of thoughts. I'd probably look at making some kind of bridle so that your tie in point will be by the bow, above the water line. It'll be a real PITA to try and tie an anchor to the d-ring, and it'll be an especially big pita to try and unty it or cut it in an emergency.

    I think a 10# mushroom anchor would be a good starting point. No sharp edges to damage your hull, and it would be tough to get one hung up on the bottom. For your depth I'd consider a 300' of line, and you'd probably be fine with 5/16" commercial fishing groundline, or if you want a real rode, 3/8" nylon anchor line. If the anchor isn't quite enough, you could add 6-10' of 1/4" galvanized chain. This would be a good fishing anchor, and not terribly expensive. It would not be suitable for anchoring for the night or leaving the boat on the water unatended.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    "....but, be capable of cutting away from the anchor line fast in case of any unexpected emergency."

    So true! I was once very surprised how fast the back end of a 16' inflatable submerges when a Cook Inlet tide changes with the anchor rope wrapped around the prop. Not fun!

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    Member akhunter83's Avatar
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    Thanks for ideas, i was already thinking about using a 10lb mushroom anchors as you suggested Paul but wasn't sure how much line to use or how to attach the line to the boat and still not sure how thats going to happen. If anyone one had some pictures of how they attach the anchor line to there inflatable that would be great or just an explanation of how to. Thanks

  6. #6

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    How do you like the saturn boat? How would you rate the quality? I've got the 12 footer coming in the mail.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    If it were my boat, I'd make a bridle going from where the ropes attach to the tops of the tubes and tie it so that you have a loop at the bow of the boat. I'd likely use a ss carabiner at the loop to tie to the anchor rode. Rock climbing carabiners quickly corrode and are dificult to open after a few exposures to salt water.

    The rule for anchor scope, i.e. how much line you have out compared to depth is 6 or 7 to 1, so 600-700' for 100' depth, but that is what will hold you in a storm. For fishing, a 3:1 scope is typically plenty.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I use a home made tow bridle on my inflatable, it has a float to keep the connection point floating and EZ to reach. I agree with paul H that 3to1 is a good rule for rode. I use a 10lb mushroom anchor and 6ft of chain. I also use a garden hose reel to keep the rope on, also use a buoy to retrieve the anchor as pulling by hands is no fun at all. Be prepared to cut away if necessary and BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL attempting to retrieve a stuck anchor. I have read of more than one tragic outcome were boaters tied off to the rear cleat and tried to motor the anchor free only to pull their stern under and swamp their vessels. Anchors are cheap, lives are not!!!

    Another technique that helps on drifts is to use a drift sock,, even a 5 gallon bucket with a few holes drilled in it will help,, inflatables tend to want to get blown by the wind.





    Have fun and catch a boat load.


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    I agree with all that has been said about amount of anchor line.

    I always use 10 feet of chain first then the rope .... it makes all the difference I find for anchor holding power.

    I used to use a small folding grapnel, like the ones found in most boat shops. I was never very happy with the amount of drag from this anchor.... doesn't hold in mud or sand bottoms, holds well in rocky bottoms but can be hard to retrieve.

    I now use a small guardian anchor....... super light...... can get take apart models. I believe it is the Guardian G-5. So far always easy to retrieve.

    I like the bridle idea with a float.... I will set one up!

    Great forum!

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    AKh,
    another, 'how do you like the Saturn?' question. I am really looking into getting a 12' or 14' inflateable in time for Silvers and Deer; easier for me to get an inflatable launched on some of the small beaches here than take my other boat around the bays.

    In between Saturn and JPMarine Tender series??? What size motor do yopu have on the 14'?

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    Member akhunter83's Avatar
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    So far i've had the boat out twice. Once on sand lake to make sure the boat and motor were good. The second time was last weekend at deep creek. Right know I am running a 1996 Johnson 30 Hp 2 stroke and it pushes it the really good. The one thing i would suggest is to get a hydrofoil for the motor. I plan on installing one after the weekend. So far am satisfied with boats preformance, the setup time is about 25 minutes from pulling it out of the bag to putting the motor on and thats with an electric air pump i bought. I will be out fishing for halibut every weekend in July besides the upcoming weekend. So i'll have more of a report after a few more trips.

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