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Thread: Permafrost?

  1. #1

    Default Permafrost?

    I'm thinking of buying an island on a lake near Glenallen. Is there any opinions out there on whether or not there would be permafrost? I'd prefer first hand information on island living, but opinions would do.

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    Permafrost is normal throughout most of the state. I've never dug any deep holes in that specific part of the state, but there is permafrost down on the Kenai Peninsula in great quantities.

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    We don't own island land on Lake Louise but by looking at the islands that are on it I'd say some of the better ground can be found on them. I think some of them have decent gravel on them. With that said there is lots of permafrost in the Glenallen area. Much will depend on the exact location you are looking at as to what kind of ground you will have. If you have only the small black spruce growing there is a high likelyhood of permafrost. If you have bigger spruce, aspens or birch growing there a good chance of not having permafrost. Bigger spruce, aspens and birch are like the better soil conditions and many times there will be less permafrost in these places. Stunted spruce is a sign of bad soils and likely permafrost.

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    CKAK nailed it.

    If you have permafrost, you just need to deal with it. Build on top. Don't break the tundra! Most of the islands in my area have a lot of gravel to use for foundations.

    I would be more worried about access, boat parking, winds, noise, neighbors. Fishing.... can't forget that. I can't bank fish from my place except for grayling and whitefish..... too shallow for too far.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
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    Will they let you dig a test hole before buying? If they will i would dig several, that is the only way you will know what down there. Better to be save than sorry.

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rutting Moose View Post
    Will they let you dig a test hole before buying? If they will i would dig several, that is the only way you will know what down there. Better to be save than sorry.
    Does it really matter? I would be more worried about if the land will perk test in case of a septic system.

    100 Feet from water for a septic system.

    75 feet for a cabin. How big is the island?
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

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    If it is a small island I'd be suprised if there is permafrost. The water around the island would likely prevent it from forming. You would still have seasonal frozen ground though.

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    I would say yes.

    You do bring up an excellence question not only is the island big enough, how big is the property, and can you have a septic system? There a lot of propertys that is too small to put a cabin on because of new regulations.


  9. #9

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    The island is roughly 5 acres, surrounded by gravel. Most of the island has gigantic spruce, birch and some cottonwood except for where I want to put a cabin. There, it's the smaller stuff. I did put a shovel to it and ran into ice about 9" down. I don't know enough about it to say whether it's permafrost or seasonal. I can go up the hill a little and dig, and go down 2' and not hit ice. It's gravel and sand. This was just after ice out in the beginning of June. My personal thought about it, is that since it's an island there is a fairly constant ground temp all year long, and that heaving would be at a minimum. And the fact that gravel surrounds the whole island, it's probably not too far under that ice in the low area. How's that for optimism?

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