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Thread: Low tide for halibut?

  1. #1
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    Default Low tide for halibut?

    I'm trying to set up a trip for July 18 out of Ninilchik. Most of the captains I've called have availability, but the boat is leaving at 10:30-11:00 AM on that day. I'm guessing that's the second trip for that day, and looking at the charts, it seems like we'd be fishing the low tide.

    One outfit has us leaving at 4:00 AM that day and says that they don't run doubles at all.

    How is halibut fishing the low-tide cycle out of Ninilchik? Is it very different from the high tide cycle?

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by huckyourmeat View Post
    I'm trying to set up a trip for July 18 out of Ninilchik. Most of the captains I've called have availability, but the boat is leaving at 10:30-11:00 AM on that day. I'm guessing that's the second trip for that day, and looking at the charts, it seems like we'd be fishing the low tide.

    One outfit has us leaving at 4:00 AM that day and says that they don't run doubles at all.

    How is halibut fishing the low-tide cycle out of Ninilchik? Is it very different from the high tide cycle?
    While I have not fished for Halibut out of Ninilchik, it has been my experience that the fishing is best just before and after tide change. Once the tide gets to ripping it takes so much weight to hold bottom that it quickly wears you out if possible at all.

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    Member Gerberman's Avatar
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    The 10:30 start is the only option unless you want to go the 4:00 am start to hit the tide right, in my opinion it does not matter which tide you fish, high or low, it just has to be slack to fish the best, just before slack and just after are the best fishing. I am going at 10:00 on the 18th and 10:30 on the 19th, most of the guides know what they are doing, trust them, it their job to help you get into the fish, their reputation is their business future. The tides change every aprox. 6 hours 12 minutes. so start times change every day. Have Fun.

  4. #4

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    Ditto on the ebb. It does not matter whether high or low.

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    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Not the best for Ninilchik, but I like to fish the flood if I can find a shallow channel to funnel the current. Anchor at the upstream end and drop as much bait and chum as possible to create a scent trail and chum slick for the fish to follow. Yes, it can be effort to keep things on the bottom, but I've caught most of my bigger fish on an active feed like this.

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    Generally, fishing the incoming tide is MUCH better than ebb tide. The fish are more likely to be feeding, and feeding Halibut are much more aggressive than Halibut that are merely "biting". Now, this isn't always true, but I spend a good 2 or 3 weeks fishing Halibut in Cook Inlet each year, so this is just my experience.

    July 18th, yea, the tide that day isn't good. The timing is excellent though, as low tide is at 11:12AM. (Seldovia). You'll be hitting it perfect.
    Last edited by pike_palace; 06-23-2011 at 22:12. Reason: looked at the tide book wrong
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    Member cod's Avatar
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    I have not noticed a diff between flood and ebb. Some are good some are bad. Been fishing Ninny area 29 yrs.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  8. #8

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    The best fishing I have had out of Anchor Point (close) was when the tide was RIPPING and we could barely keep 3 pounds on the bottom. 30 to 60 pounders came very fast and the boat was filling up until the sharks tore our halibut and lines up, then the seas picked up and we had to bolt. The worst fishing for me seems to be when the tide is slack.
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  9. #9

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    This is making some sense of what happened to me this week. It was my first week halibut fishing out of Homer. We found a chicken hole that produced five limits of fish in two hours one morning earlier in the week. Last night, however, we headed back out to the exact same spot thinking we could double limit easily once midnight passed. The tides were relatively low, but we only got small non-committal bites and reeled up one skate. The other people at the harbor launched the same time as us only caught one halibut and they looked seasoned. Makes me wonder if the halibut were down there, just not being aggressive because of the relative calm. I always thought slack tide would be the best time to fish, but am starting to rethink that.

  10. #10
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    the current is your friend when butt fishing, typically the slack, while easy to fish is the least productive time, fish tend to move around in the water column and not stick to the bottom. fishing thru the slack in the same spot will keep the scent in the water and usually keep a bite going, your best bite will be at the turn, either ebb or flood, does not matter.

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