Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 45

Thread: Fishing Boat Question

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    121

    Default Fishing Boat Question

    Hope this is the right forum to post this. I'm getting ready to move to Alaska in Oct. I have a (1999) 21ft Sea Pro CC with a 225 hp on it. Is there anything I should do to make sure the boat is ready for the colder temps in Alaska. The boat is a South Carolina boat.

    Also, since I plan on doing a bunch of Fishing while I'm there any recommendation or waypoint would be great. I have all my own equipment, and since I do a lot of Marlin and Tuna fishing, I have big enough equipment for big halibut.

    Again Thanks and look forward to reading all the info on this forum.

    Kyle

  2. #2

    Default

    That Sea Pro will be a nice hull for up here. Certainly the biggest thing is to add a spare kicker appropriate to its size. Seatow is not an option.

    Macho marvels will disagree, but float coats and continuous wear are mandatory, at least on my boat. Something like 90% of the boating fatalities up here are drowning because folks didn't wear a PFD. For spring fall and winter, those with some thermal protection like Mustang or Sterns are important, but a little hot for summer. We use Stormy Seas inflatable coats in summer and switch to the heavier ones the rest of the year.

    And your GPS will need the blue charts for Alaska.

    Now that I've spent a chunk of your money, you can move on to changes in terminal tackle! The tuna gear will be dandy, especially if its stand up, while the marlin gear will be overkill. If salmon is on your bucket list, you'll need lighter gear for them.

  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    There isn't anything special you'll need to add to the boat for cold temps, but you'll probably find you really wished you had a boat with a cabin to extend the amount of time you can comfortably use the boat. Even in the middle of "summer" you can be in temps in the 50's, add rain and wind and that is downright firigid. So you'll need appropriate clothing for the conditions. As BB mentioned, a float coat is highly recomended, but then again there are days where the temps are in the 70's with sun out, and your float coat will be stashed.

    People generally don't give out waypoints, but are more than happy to give general locations and the type of bottom terrain to concentrate on. Personally I've found that finding my own spots has been more prodcutive than using other peoples coordinates, and it makes you a better fisherman.

    Honestly the majority of halibut caught are well under 100#'s and then generally don't put up a tremendous fight. Hence while you can use large tuna/marlin gear, and such gear is often used, it is both not needed and wears you out. Investing in a butterfly style jigging rod with a small reel that produces drag in the 15-20# range spooled with 300yds of 55-65# braid with 8-24 oz jigs will make fishing for halibut , lingcod and rockfish a 10 times more enjoyable time.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    121

    Default

    Paul, BrownBear,

    Thanks for the replies. I'm looking forward to getting up there and getting into the fishing. I'm sure won't be able to get out much until the spring or summer, but will be well prepared. As for my gear, I have a wide assortment. I have three 80 lb stand up slammers with Penn reels, one is an International 50, a 9 and a 6. I also have my lighter weight jigging rod with Penn 555 highspeel loaded with color oded P-line I bought while in Japan. Nice thing about that line is when I mark fish, I can tell buy how many colors have gone out how deep I am. I also have two 30 lb class jigginh rods with 30 lb class spinning reels I bought in 2008 in the United Arab Emerates. I use them a lot for jigging Amberjack and Grouper in SC. I think I have the right gear, will just need to learn the right tactics and locations.

  5. #5

    Default

    Sounds like you're well set on the halibut/rockfish side. Those jigging rods will get a lot more use than the standups and marlin rigs. Probably the only thing against good spinning reels is king salmon that hit a jig "on the drop". Doesn't happen all the time, but often enough while halibut fishing to get your attention. It's just a lot easier to sense that happening with a casting reel.

    If you get serious about salmon you'll have to rig up for them with a whole different set of rods and reels, and probably downriggers. I'd wait on buying any of that till you're up here and look around before making up your own mind. Asking what kind of salmon gear is best gets the same kind of answers you get asking which coffee or car is best. And that doesn't even touch the question of river gear!

    Let me be the first to welcome you to the great state!

  6. #6
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    As BB alluded to, you'll want to add a couple of salmon rods. Unless you get serious about chasing kings, you don't need to invest in downriggers. Planers can get you down for trolling, or my preference, mooching. While I love bottom fishing, nothing beats fighting and boating silvers! You never know what you might catch while fishing for them, as plenty of folks end up getting halibut on their salmon rods. Salmon rods don't have to break the bank, there are plenty of nice rods in the $50-100 range, and reels for ~$100 on up. I've used 8 1/2' shimano scimitar with charter special 1000 reels spooled w/ 30# braid for a couple years and they work great. I also have a shimano clarus 9' with avet sx I've been dieing to try this year.

    Not sure what kind of jigs you have, but they will probably work fine, most bottom fish are not picky, though tipping a jig with a bit of herring or gulp never hurts. Because of our currents and depths, you might need to go heavier. You'll probably find 8-24oz is what your using most. Often times I'll go with a 16 oz jig, even if I don't need that weight to stay verticle, because I won't have to change out jigs as the tide starts to run. I use a combination of lead heads, and butterfly style jigs, and point wilson darts and crippled herring in the 4-6 oz range for salmon and rockfish.





    You'll definately love it up here, and another welcome to AK!

    Oh, the only thing you might want to add to the boat is a long anchor rode if you don't already have one. 600' is a good length, both for fishing, and being to get a proper scope for riding out a storm. Our water can get very deep, very fast, especially in Prince William Sound. There are areas where you can be a couple hundred yards from shore, and in 1000 feet of water.

    Here's a good link for free charts, well you gotta print them:

    http://ocsdata.ncd.noaa.gov/BookletC...kletCharts.htm

    I'd suggest 16682, 16645, 16700, 16705, 16683
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    121

    Default

    Paul H,

    Thanks for the pictures of the jigs. I have a decent assortment of metal jigs, like the ones in your second picture, but will need to invest in some lead heads. I didn't know what size was right, so your info helps a bunch. As for the Kings, I'll definately be getting into that action. I've fished for Salmon before, but only rivers in Washington State. Saltwater fishing for King's will be a brand new thing for me. I'm all about trolling though, but pretty sure my Marlin Lures won't work for them In one of the posts I read that Seatow is not an option. There are no boat towing services in Alaska? I am a member of BoatUS, but if there is no service up there, then I guess I'll canx. As for the kicker, I've been looking around, will probably go with a 9.9 and have that ready before I leave out to Alaska. I'll be driving up, so should be a long but very cool ride with the family. Do you all recommend any of the EPIRB's? I think that is the right acronym? I was thinking about getting one for emergency purposes. I have a good VHF on the boat, so not really sure if it's needed. I guess it depends on how far out you need to run to hit the good fishing? When I go out in Charleston, you have to go out a good ways before you get into any real good bottom fishing. Out there, you can't see lan, but I noticed in most of the videos and pictures I see from Alaska, that land is visible and often close by. What do you think? What I'm thinking I'll do is take a charter or two to see how they do it and then go out on my boat, we'll see. I'm usually a quick learner, so I'll have to think about that one. Just really looking forward to getting up there and htting the water. Since I'm in Kuwati right now, getting back to the real world and heading up there is gonna be sweet.

    For Brownbear, I've looked into downriggers, I'm gonna think about those. I've never used them, so will have to learn if I do decide to buy.

    Thanks,
    Kyle

  8. #8
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Firstly, thanks for your service! and, keep your head down.

    There are limited dedicated tow services up here, honestly the only one I've seen was in Seldovia, across from Homer. I think there are some towing services in every port. I think part of the reason there aren't more tow services is most boaters take the Alaskan addage of being prepared and have redundances and backups. And then there is the Alaskan attitude of healping the other guy out, so most boaters in distress end up getting towed in by a fellow boater. This is a great example of the Alaskan mentality, but often what it reflects is the few folks that head out ill prepared with poorly maintained boats that put themselves, the coast guard and fellow boaters at risk. The Lethcoe cruising guide for Prince William Sound has an excellent section on preparing your boat for Alaskan waters and suitable backup equipment.

    I don't personally carry an e-pirb, though it is a worthwhile piece of equipment and I might get one in the future. A DCS capable VHF would be a good idea. I carry cold water survival suits for everyone in my family, a fairly well equiped ditch bag (search the power boating forum for ideas) and an inflatable dinghy. My boat simply isn't big enough for me to feel comfortable heading into waters where I'd feel that I'd need an E-pirb and the USCG would be my only hope for assistance.

    As far as going on a charter or two, honestly I'd say what I've learned from some charters is to have low expectations Technique wise, halibut are one of the easiest fish to catch, find them, drop something in front of them, and they are apt to bite. What you really need to learn, and aren't going to get from a charter is how to read bottom contour and getting a feel on what side of the terrain you are on the fish are feeding on due to where the bait fish are. It is frowned upon, and rightly so, to bring a gps on a charter But it really isn't needed, as there is plenty of good info on this forum regarding general areas and what terrain to look for. The thread on bottom types for halibut earlier this year was one of the best. The biggest plus for a charter is somebody else does the driving, and somebody else cleans the fish, sometimes I miss that.

    As far as how far you have to run for halibut, it depends on what port you head out from, anwhere from 5 to 100 miles. You'd be suprised how far out you can head, and you'll still see land. Here's a view from Montague Island, looking kinda towards Whittier ~80 miles from port. When you have 10-14,000' peaks near shore, you have to head pretty far out not to see land!



    That might be a more extremen example, but most ports have 3-6,000 peaks, so again, you can head a long way out and still see land.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  9. #9
    Member FishKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    260

    Default

    And your GPS will need the blue charts for Alaska. [Quote from BrownBear]


    Very True. Money well spent.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    121

    Default

    FishKing,

    I'll definately be picking up a new GPS and the Alaska charts. I've been ooking at the new Humminbird 788ci HD DI. This unit is new for 2011 and the down imaging is awesome from what I've read about. I already have a Lowrance LMS 350A on the boat. It's old, black and white, but the sonar is exceptional. The only issue I have is the GPS, which is only the point the arrow in the direction of the way point type. I'll be using both on the boat.

    Paul H, I read the thread on bottom types. Seems like there are a lot of different opionions on the best type, mud, snad, rack, kelp. I'll probably try all sorts and then stick with which works best for me. Again, just real excited about getting up there and getting out on the water.

    For other boats, is there normally a good amount of traffic out on the water? Or is there any groups that get together and go out together? Would definately feel more comfortable out there if I was close to someone with a little experience, at least on my first trip. Either way, I'm pretty confident with my boat, and if I have the family with me, which most times I will, I'll be taking every precaution.

  11. #11

    Default

    If you're looking at GPS/sounders, have a look at the Lawrence Elite series. I've been using the little 5 for a couple of years, and I'm blown away. The GPS is really quick and highly repeatable, and the sounder is unbelievable. You can actually watch your jigs under the boat, which is really cool for hitting a particular depth.

    The Elite comes in larger models, so you can pick and choose. The price came down this year and you can buy the unit packaged with the blue charts for less than I paid for the bare unit a couple of years back. Counting the blue charts, it's a savings of over $200 if my math is in the park.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    121

    Default

    Bb,

    I was looking at the Elite 5, but I read a few negative comments about it, so it had me concerned. Plus the Humminbird has an internal GPS receiver which I like. Do you think down imaging will be useful there?

    Thanks,
    Kyle

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    121

    Default

    Bb, I just read about the Elite 5, and see that it also has the internal GPS. I see one on ebay for $664 with the Navionics Gold SD Card. You might have just changed my mind. BTW...I just picked up 1000M's of multicolored 60lb braid off ebay. I'm gonna load my two jig master roads and spinning reels with it when I get back home from Kuwait so they are ready for Alaska. Not sure of the quality, but the price was good for 1000M's I think.

    Kyle

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle Snider View Post
    Bb,
    Do you think down imaging will be useful there?
    I dunno. I haven't seen it at work and can't recall anyone who has. It may be a "comfort" thing, but I've never felt like I was missing anything using the Elite 5.

    I can't imagine what the negatives were on the 5, but I recognize that applications and circumstances differ widely, and that in any manufactured product there have to be a few dinks sneaking through inspection.

    All I can say is that just about everyone who watches mine in use buys one of their own when they get back to town. First words when they see mine are "Wow!", and when they get their own they seem to do a lot of giggling.

  15. #15
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I know it's tough to $wing, but you might want to consider a stand alone GPS and Fishfinder. I have an older Garmin combo unit, and my biggest gripe is while the screen is fine as either stand alone gps or sonar, when you go into the split screen, it's simply too small. My second gripe is the sonar is far from the best and I'd really like a 600W minimum unit. One of these days I'll get an upgraded stand alone sonar.

    As far as traffic on the water, from mid May to Labor day, you'll likely be hardpressed to get out on the water and not see several other boats, and thats not just on weekends and holidays. My last job was more flexible regarding taking mid week fishing trips, and while mid week isn't as crowded at the ramps, there are still boats hitting the fishing holes and out cruising.

    A big spool of braid is never a bad thing, I got 1800m of Daiwa PE-4 55 pound and have spooled 3 jigging rods and two salmon rods with it, and will likely top off a couple of other jigging rods. I really like the feel of the line over power pro, but I haven't had a chance to fish it yet.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  16. #16
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Idaho/Valdez
    Posts
    980

    Default

    Kyle....welcome to the great land, soon anyway! I see you getting some fine answers to your questions...so here is one for you...and sorry if you already said this but I didn't see it anywhere...where do you plan to boat in Alaksa? Knowing that, maybe some of us can meeti you on the water...and will you be up this summer? Heck, we might even run into you on the drive up!

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    121

    Default

    I plan on fishing and boating anywhere I can get my 21 ft Sea Pro in the water. I've been concentrating on Seward for now, but will fan out as I get more experience with the area and make more contacts. I won't be up until Late November, but will be ready to hit the water as soon as the weather allows. I'm currently in Kuwait deployed, so have a lot of work to do to get everything packed up and moved when the family and I head that way. I'll be on this forum a bunch so we'll definately have to plan some fishing when I get up there. Thanks

    BTW...anyone have any recommendations on custom made curtains for a T Top. I'm looking at getting some clear plastic ones made for my T-Top so I can roll them down and get out of the weather when needed.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    121

    Default

    Paul,

    I was thinking since I already have the LMS 350A (Lowrance) on there I would buy a combo. I'll mostly use it for the GPS, but the new ones with Down Imaging might be a neat tool to have. The LMS 350A is a great black and white sonar. It also has GPS, but it's the old point the arrow in the direction of the waypoint type. No map overlays or charts. I'll let you know if I decide to go a different direction, but really the only reason for getting the new combo is for the down imaging. As for the braid, once I get back and am able to try it out, I'll decide if I want to get more. I like the multicolor stuff when marking fish on the fish finder. I started using it in Okinawa Japan jigging for Tuna. Was awesome when the captain would yell out they are at 70 and I'd drop down 7 colors and wham-o! Caught a really nice 60lb tuna with it. Check out www.2catchfish.com and look at the fishing reports for Okinawa. You'll see some of mine with the picture of me and my son beside the tuna. Found out after I had already fileted it, that I could have sold it at the Japanese fish market for a lot of money. Oh well, tasted great!

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    121

    Default

    Paul,

    Just did some research on my old LMS 350A. It shows a 3000W Output and a Max depth of 1500 ft.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    121

    Default

    Man...glad I didn't get beat up as bad as the other guy on here when I made the rookie mistake of asking for waypoints. Some of you guys are vicious!

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •