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Thread: No crab from charter boats!

  1. #1
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Default No crab from charter boats!

    Looks like they put the end(well almost) to catching crab from charter boats.
    Or at least they made it a whole lot harder.
    Not sure how many charter boats were doing this but I know at least a couple of them in Homer have been.
    Maybe this will allow us to keep our 5 a day in Homer this season. It would be nice for those of us who don't live in Homer to put a little more crab in our freezers. not that it's not that I can eat 5 a day.But since I don't live in Homer and spend 1/2 my time on the slope it is nice to have some crab in the freezer during the middle of winter while the roads are icy the weather is cold and my boat is tucked away in the shop.

    Statewide News Release

    (Released: May 20, 2011)

    ALASKA DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME
    Cora Campbell, Commissioner

    DIVISION OF SPORT FISH
    Charles O. Swanton, Director
    Contact:
    Matt G. Miller
    Region II Fisheries Biologist
    Phone: (907) 267-2515
    May 20, 2011
    NEW REGULATIONS FOR TANNER AND KING CRAB FISHERIES
    The Alaska Board of Fisheries approved regulation changes during the March meeting for Tanner and king crab sport fisheries.
    All Waters Statewide
    An owner, operator, or employee of a lodge, charter vessel, or other enterprise that furnishes food, lodging, or sport fishing guide services may not furnish to a client or guest of that enterprise, king or Tanner crab that has been taken under sport, subsistence, or personal use regulations, unless:
    • The king or Tanner crab has been taken with gear deployed and retrieved by the client or guest;
    • The gear has been marked with client’s or guest’s name and address as required;
    • The king or Tanner crab is to be consumed by, or in the presence of, the client or guest.
    Additionally captain and crew members of a charter vessel may not deploy, set, or retrieve their own sport, personal use, or subsistence gear when that vessel is being chartered.
    North Gulf Waters
    In the waters between Gore Point at 150° 57.85' W. long., and Cape Fairfield at 148° 50.25' W. long., no more than two pots per person with a maximum of six pots per vessel may be used to take Tanner crab under sport, subsistence, or personal use regulations.
    Anglers are encouraged to review the “2011 Sport Fishing Regulations Summary Booklet” for any additional updated information for the area they plan to fish before they leave. For more information, contact your local ADF&G office, or the ADF&G website at: http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...hingSport.main

    — END —
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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  2. #2
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    I don't really have a problem with any of that other than the marking of the gear with the clients name and address. That seems a bit ridiculous to me.

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    I thought that was already status quo? Though dungie pots are easier to pull we send folks out with pots with a bouy and their name on a milk jug or the like. Charters do the same. Dump it off in the AM pick it in the PM. I can see liability from having folks run the puller though would be high!
    Mike
    www.coffmancoveak.com
    Prince of Wales Island

  4. #4
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gooch View Post
    I thought that was already status quo? Though dungie pots are easier to pull we send folks out with pots with a bouy and their name on a milk jug or the like. Charters do the same. Dump it off in the AM pick it in the PM. I can see liability from having folks run the puller though would be high!
    Hadn't thought about a milk jug or other easy to find and disposable buoy. I guess that's not as difficult to accomplish as I was originally thinking.

  5. #5
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coho slayer View Post
    Hadn't thought about a milk jug or other easy to find and disposable buoy. I guess that's not as difficult to accomplish as I was originally thinking.
    Wasn't thinking along those lines either that is a simple way around it.
    Still it does cut back on the guides keeping a limit for themselves. Unless they want to drop off the clients and go back later for their personnel crab fishing.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  6. #6
    Member Cliffhanger's Avatar
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    Remember that clients would also need to get a permit from ADF&G and sometimes that's not going to be possible (like when folks arrive too late in the day -or too early- to get by ADF&G office)...

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cliffhanger View Post
    Remember that clients would also need to get a permit from ADF&G and sometimes that's not going to be possible (like when folks arrive too late in the day -or too early- to get by ADF&G office)...
    Its kind of a slippery slope and gray area really, I think. You pay a charter to take you halibut/salmon/lingcod/rockfish fishing which they are licensed to do so commercially, and as a side bonus let you toss over their crab pots. Providing you personally mark the buoy, toss and retrieve the pot, have your license its all ok, and providing the charter captain doesn't serve you crab he's already caught. But he can serve you (lodge) crab you caught. There's a commercial charter quota on charter halibut, I believe 10 percent of the overall quota allowed by fisheries. How about salmon? And now shell fish? Personally, I think its a great side bonus to toss a pot over and retrieve it returning, on a charter. Just not sure how to keep it all in check, and turning this in to an over fished sport.
    Alaska Outdoors Television ~ Outdoor Channel

  8. #8
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cliffhanger View Post
    Remember that clients would also need to get a permit from ADF&G and sometimes that's not going to be possible (like when folks arrive too late in the day -or too early- to get by ADF&G office)...
    Good point! I am guessing this was an attempt from ADF&G as a way to get around the guides giving clients their limit of crabs to those without crab harvest cards yet still allow the clients to participate if they choose to.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  9. #9

    Default Crab Cards?

    As an angler with a trip scheduled to Kodiak, I am a little concerned with what I am reading here. Yesterday I talked to the biologist in Kodiak and he stated all I needed for crabbing was a non-resident license and to assure that any float attached to a crab pot was properly identified(name, address, license no, boat name or reg). ( I also understand the escape mechanism regs but have concerns that I might be sold 61 count cotton thread)

    I specifically asked him if I needed anything else and the answer was no. I will be fishing on a lodge charter boat. What is the reference here to a "card"

    I can see myself eating dinner and looking over my shoulder for the Alaska Food Police as my fish and crabs might have been mixed with another anglers or the Lodge owners by the chef.

    My future trips will be to Mexico where the regulations at leaste make sense!

  10. #10
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerrymen View Post
    I specifically asked him if I needed anything else and the answer was no. I will be fishing on a lodge charter boat. What is the reference here to a "card"
    Harvest cards are Required in the Tanner crab fishery in Cook Inlet.
    Kodiak probably has different regs. You can usually count on ADF&G to give you fairly accurate info.
    If you are using pots that belong to the lodge they should be legal as far as escape mechanisms rotton cotton etc.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by jerrymen View Post
    As an angler with a trip scheduled to Kodiak, I am a little concerned with what I am reading here. Yesterday I talked to the biologist in Kodiak and he stated all I needed for crabbing was a non-resident license and to assure that any float attached to a crab pot was properly identified(name, address, license no, boat name or reg). ( I also understand the escape mechanism regs but have concerns that I might be sold 61 count cotton thread)

    I specifically asked him if I needed anything else and the answer was no. I will be fishing on a lodge charter boat. What is the reference here to a "card"

    I can see myself eating dinner and looking over my shoulder for the Alaska Food Police as my fish and crabs might have been mixed with another anglers or the Lodge owners by the chef.

    My future trips will be to Mexico where the regulations at leaste make sense!
    Certainly one disadvantage to being the largest state in the union is the size of Alaska reg book, and any chance of making sense out of it the first few go rounds. ADF&G is always your best bet for correct advice.
    Alaska Outdoors Television ~ Outdoor Channel

  12. #12
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Yes, I agree with others. The short answer is that Kodiak has pretty different crab regulations than Cook Inlet, for instance. I would go with what F&G tells you. I'd also get the name of who you talked to and make a note of it so IF someone questions what you're doing you can say, "I talked to so-so with Alaska Fish and Game and I am doing what they told me was legal." Most lodges/charters know the specific regs that they have to work within, so as long as they are following what F&G told you, I wouldn't worry about it.

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