Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Salmon Spine Deformity

  1. #1
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    N'ern S.E. AK
    Posts
    838

    Default Salmon Spine Deformity

    Cleaned a few salmon in my day. Never saw this one before. It's a small hatchery king.

    Just wondering what folks thought. congential defect? or traumatic injury as a juvenile?



  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    The times that I've seen hatchery fry there is generally a small population that suffer from scoliosis (sp?). They generally die along with the siamese twins. Could be this one wasn't effected enough to lose function. Neat find for sure.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  3. #3
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    N'ern S.E. AK
    Posts
    838

    Default

    Funny you mentioned scoliosis. I looked up that before I posted. That's a lateral deformation of the spine. This wasn't exhibited on the specimen.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    Your google-fu is strong.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  5. #5
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Aberdeen WA
    Posts
    4,516

    Default



    This ER Russian River sockeye with similar but more exaggerrated deformities certainly made it a bit tough to fillet the fNp way.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

  6. #6

    Default

    It's been a couple of years since I've had to do the Russian, but is that a fish cleaning station on the step platform? When did they add those. I remember the in-water tables they had but then got rid of.

    LG, I notice you do the "cut through then slide down" method of filleting that give the flat fillet but miss a lot of meat. Do you go back and get that nice strip of meat where the backbone meats (pun intended) the spine? I saw a fellow use that method last week in Seward. He was tossing his carcasses away until we asked if we could have them. We got two beautiful strips of meat off each one (like a tenderloin) until he saw us doing it and started filleting to the bone. Just curious as to what you do and if you go after those tasty tenderloin-like strips.

  7. #7
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    N'ern S.E. AK
    Posts
    838

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheeser View Post
    Just curious as to what you do and if you go after those tasty tenderloin-like strips.
    There is a little left. My cats enjoy the sushi . . .

    okay - I don't do flexible fillet knives very well. If you have 2 or 3 fish, you might get enuff trimmings to make a burger-sized patty.

  8. #8
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska - I wasn't born here, but I got here as soon as I could!
    Posts
    3,279

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheeser View Post
    It's been a couple of years since I've had to do the Russian, but is that a fish cleaning station on the step platform? When did they add those. I remember the in-water tables they had but then got rid of.

    LG, I notice you do the "cut through then slide down" method of filleting that give the flat fillet but miss a lot of meat. Do you go back and get that nice strip of meat where the backbone meats (pun intended) the spine? I saw a fellow use that method last week in Seward. He was tossing his carcasses away until we asked if we could have them. We got two beautiful strips of meat off each one (like a tenderloin) until he saw us doing it and started filleting to the bone. Just curious as to what you do and if you go after those tasty tenderloin-like strips.
    OK, I'll ask. Where exactly does the backbone meet the spine? Last I checked, they were the same thing.

  9. #9
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,852

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    OK, I'll ask. Where exactly does the backbone meet the spine? Last I checked, they were the same thing.
    LOL

    I re-read that quizzically, too. Thought I'd read it wrong the first time.

  10. #10

    Default

    LOL! Got a good chuckle myself after re-reading it. The bones running from the spine to the dorsal region? Better?

    I think you're missing more meat than you realize. A cross section of a salmon fillet should appear tent-shaped, with the peak of the tent being those strips next to the spine. Your fillets are missing the entire peak (although they sure are pretty compared to my hacked up mess). The strips we were getting from that fellow's carcasses were very nice. Two made a meal for one person which equates to an extra serving from each sockeye. But Seward reds are massive. When I'm done filleting I like seeing what fishNphysician has in his pic - the white of bone everywhere.

    Like your cat, one of my friend's dogs LOVES those little trimmings. She'll sit next to the cleaning table all day eating all of the salmon sushi you care to give her. But boy oh boy does she have some stinky breath after that!!

    Does anyone else toss your carcasses onto the grill for a couple minutes each side and pull off the meat/skin/fat/etc. for dog food? You'd be amazed how much meat comes off of what appears to be a clean carcass.

  11. #11
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    N'ern S.E. AK
    Posts
    838

    Default

    Hey, I'm not too proud to take lessons some time. I don't think F&G would cite me for wanton waste.

    I do use my carcasses for crab bait - both for dungy and kings. Any amount of remaining flesh (which had quite a bit of scent) is just converted into expontentially more succulent crab meat. I throw my old herring in the bait bags for even more scent.

  12. #12
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,121

    Default

    Friends of ours toss the filleted carcass on the grill and that is what they have fresh for dinner. More than enough to feed a couple on most fillet jobs. Our dog gets the carcass at our place after a quick grilling.
    BK

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Central Missouri
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Several years ago a gentleman came by the charter service as the guides were fileting our catch. When they were done fileting, he took the carcasses (mainly he wanted the salmon). I asked the guides what he did with them. They said he smoked them and peeled off the usable meat. Said he got around 40-50# of meat to can / put up last year just by taking the carcasses.

  14. #14
    Member JR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,129

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bkmail View Post
    Friends of ours toss the filleted carcass on the grill and that is what they have fresh for dinner. More than enough to feed a couple on most fillet jobs. Our dog gets the carcass at our place after a quick grilling.
    BK
    I have been doing that for years, on a 30 lb king you can a few people with just that meat.
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

  15. #15
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Aberdeen WA
    Posts
    4,516

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheeser View Post
    It's been a couple of years since I've had to do the Russian, but is that a fish cleaning station on the step platform? When did they add those. I remember the in-water tables they had but then got rid of.
    That platform is at a private campground on the Kenai. My guests had been fishing the Russian before driving the rest of the way to camp.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •