Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 48

Thread: What Was Your Best Shot?

  1. #1

    Thumbs up What Was Your Best Shot?

    Given all the circumstances, what would you consider the best shot you ever made on game or varmints? One of those situations where everything just came together. It could be a triple on geese or ducks, or a double on pheasants, a cross canyon shot, or shooting the nose off a peek-a-boo whistle pig.

    Mine was a paced off 180 yard open sight 22 lr shot on a pesky and elusive woodchuck in my mom's winter wheat field. Every time I would get within a hundred yards of him he'd go down his tractor axle breaking hole. After a while, I decided that if I couldn't kill him, maybe I could scare him into moving on to the next farm. The wind was right and I braced my shot on Mom's grape arbor. It hit way short, but sent him down his hole. About an hour later I looked out the window and there he was chowing down on the profits. This time I aimed about twenty yards behind him and squeezed one off from my Dad's not so tack driving JC Higgins 22. Much to my surprise I saw the chuck hunch up and no dust kicked up. He crawled to his hole and disappeared, never to be seen. There was a small bit of blood on the ground by the hole. Mom was able to pay the taxes for another year. No tractors were actually harmed due to the results of my dead eye shooting.

  2. #2
    Member AKRoadkill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    577

    Default

    Best...a 570 yard shot on a prairie dog with my Rock River Varmint AR-15 with 6-24x Sightron...took a couple of "not my best shots" to figure out the holdover, though.

    Dumb-luckiest...showing off as a young teenager, shot a crow out of the air with a .22 rifle at about 150 yards.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Valley trash.....and proud of it.
    Posts
    813

    Default

    My best shot was probably the stupidest one I have ever made. We were caribou hunting the mulchatna herd about 10 years ago. I seen a bull that was just different and I liked it. range was around 250yards but the problem was all I seen was the head, neck and the very top of the back due to the ridge it was on the other side of and it was moving. I took the shot anyways and dropped it like a sack of bricks. I didnt know what was ont he other side of the bull or anything. now as I look back I wouldnt have taken the shot. To many variables that I wasnt sure of. made a good mount though. Not book but nice.

    one other shot that I couldnt do again to save my life was on the same trip. me and my buddy were waiting for the herd to get closer. he was shooting a contender so I told him he can shoot first, unknown to both of us we were aiming on the same bull. he was taking forever and the caribou were withing 100yards, so I started taking up slack on my trigger. he shot a split second before I did and a cow dropped along with the bull. since we were after meat no one was disheartened by dropping a cow. anyways not a single hole was in the cow. I was scratching my head on this one. upon closer examination there was blood coming out of both ears and the skull plate was broken. she was literally shot right through the ears. it could never be duplicated, while butchering her up we took our time thinking maybe we missed a hole but nothing could be found. only thing I can think of is when he shot, she jumped and everything lined up. Dont know.

  4. #4

    Default

    I was 12 years old and from the length of a long classroom I hit the teacher in the back of the head with a really soggy spitball the size of a golf ball. Never managed anything more difficult with a gun.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Barnhart, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    60

    Default What was your best shot

    While rabbit hunting one day, my brother and I jumped a covey of quail.
    quail season and rabbit season are open the same time in Missouri. I picked a bird out and fired. 4 quail fell to the ground. Best probably not, luckiest, definitely. I had missed several shots on rabbits earlier, so this shot upped my average for the day.

    I have shot 3 drake mallards flying with one shot and on another occasion 2 turkey flying with one shot. All unintentional. But thought is was a good opportunity to bring them up.

    My best shot was on a running whitetail, crossing in front of me at 275 yards. 30-06, 150 gr. Hit the shoulder and piled him up. Could I do it again? Maybe. When I 1st started deer hunting in the early 70's in Missouri, if you seen 1 deer during the 9 day deer season, you better take a shot, for it was probably the only deer you were going to see. These days I would pass on this shot.

    Another time a bunch of us was out in the woods scouting for deer before the rifle season. A good way to find a deer crossing in Misoouri is to walk the roads and look for a pile of beer cans. If you find a pile of beer cans, just head 40 or 50 yards down the road and you will find a good deer crossing. The backwoods locals in Missouri, drink beer as they wait for deer to cross the road in front of them. They pitch their empties out on the road. Anyway its been a while back and a friend put one of the cans out in the road as we walked back to camp. It was a while back, it was a stag beer can, one that had a buck on the front of it about 1/2 inch tall. We walked about 100 yards down the road and he asked me if I could hit the can. I turned, sighted down on it and fired. Hit the deer, just above the word stag right between the eyes. Lucky again? Probably. I was young and stupid and shouldn't have fired in the road. You live and learn. But my friend was impressed.

    Just some of the memories of shots I have taken in the past. Thanks for making me think back. Its been fun.

    KatzMO

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska
    Posts
    230

    Default

    When I was 12, I got five ruffed grouse, all in the head, on the fly with one shot from my "Hercules" 20 gauge. I was hunting with a close friend and pretended like is it nothing special and just collected the grouse.

  7. #7

    Default

    myself and thre buddies were on our way to go coyote hunting, driving through the palouse farm land when we spot a coyote on the side of the road, we pile out. I am in the back seat of an old 4runnre so it takes me a bit to get out, the dog is bookin' now. my buddies rip about 10 rounds at him.......nothin' he is about 950yds and going full tilt, I toss one at him, he is in the lower left of my scope, a 9power, I shoot.....nothing. then 2 seconds later he piles up dead! total luck but cool none the less.

    the best planned shot was this year I shot a bull in the neck at 411yds after my partner missed with EVERY bullet he had, mine piled up on the spot, I tossed him my gun and told him which of the tds bars to use, he shoots and now we have double the work......witness' are key to a sweet shot.

  8. #8

    Default

    the most impressive shot I ever saw was not at game it was at Front Sight Nevada, a DOE Sniper was told the threat was 800-1000meters away......that was his info.

    He runs to the top of a hill, glasses for 30 seconds maybe, sets up his gun, a 308win, and within 1 minute the shot was off, he hit the threat, who was holding a hostage, dead as can be. this was in the nevada desert in jan/feb and the wind was howling, the shot was like 830 meters. I was very IMPRESSED!

  9. #9

    Default Shooting

    The longest shot I ever made was a 986 yards on a praire dog with my 6-284 win, the 107 grn bullet found its mark. My favorite was 3 coyotes out of a pack, I was using a deadly assault AR-15 in .223.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Deep in Hllary country NY
    Posts
    446

    Wink

    My best shot was at 8 yards. I killed a 12 pt. P&Y deer, my best.The shot was from a home made treestand,we had no money, in 50 mph winds. I was so nervous that I droped my tab on the ground as he ran in, he was chasing a doe during the rut! It was so windy that you could not stand up without holding on to the tree for dear life! I had to stand, load an arrow on to the bow, and shoot with bare fingers, as the tree limbs slapped each other! It was so dangerous that I would not hunt that way again, had no business being in a tree under those conditions! Ah.. to be young again! LOL . Bill
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sitka, AK
    Posts
    142

    Default

    I was about 13 and got a stalk on two little bucks that were feeding together. The idea was for me to take one, my dad to take the other. As the bucks were feeding towards each other, head down, their necks crossed as one stepped next to and in front of the other. Even at 13, I saw the opportunity and took it. Two deer, one shot with the '06... wasn't a hard shot, only about 40 yards... but it was a rare one.

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Burton View Post
    I was about 13 and got a stalk on two little bucks that were feeding together. The idea was for me to take one, my dad to take the other. As the bucks were feeding towards each other, head down, their necks crossed as one stepped next to and in front of the other. Even at 13, I saw the opportunity and took it. Two deer, one shot with the '06... wasn't a hard shot, only about 40 yards... but it was a rare one.
    I watched my cousin shoot 5 or 6 piegons with a 25-06 like that.....pretty cool

  13. #13
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default A good shot...

    This is a good one Flyer, a very good one.

    It was way back many years ago when a good coyote hide was worth $40 or more. I was coyote hunting with a buddy of mine. We would wait in ambush at one end of an eighty acre hay field with a commanding view of the length of the field. Lengthwise this field was a full half mile, 880 yards and 440 yards in width. At the north side, to our right, was hardwood timber which partially wrapped around to the west end, directly in front of us. Our plan was to watch this field as the 'yotes would come into it in the evening to catch mice in the hay stubble. In the center of the field was a depression which led directly from the timber. This gave a rather isolated pathway from cover to their playground and several guys had seen coyotes out in the middle of the field.

    My buddy, John, was shooting his only rifle a Remington 700 in 30-06. I had loaded for him some 125 or 130 grain bullets that were smoking out the barrel and it shot very flat. I had a good Ruger No. 1B in 25-06, a good long range varminter. I think both scopes were the 3.5-10 Leupolds.

    With the cold wind in our faces and the overcast sky coming down upon us, the glow of the setting sun told us we were almost out of coyote shooting light. Just as we were ready to pack up and find a warm spot to swap lies, the field began to fill with 'yotes. On John's side he immediately spotted a huge coyote that was about half white. This animal stood out from the others in both size and color. I picked a good one on my end of the pack and we agreed to shoot on 'three', both knowing, that never works.
    We settled in and aimed as our targets stopped their zig-zag manuevers in the field, we both fired almost perfectly in unison.

    The uninjured members of the pack of about 8 or 10 set out in a dead run back to the north west and into the timber. One straggling and struggling member of the group quickly fell behind and we watched as it tipped over after a run of about 250 yards. This one was Johns, or so we thought.

    John and I were very confident in our shots as we trotted down to the center of the field. John had fixed his gaze on the one we watched fall and he went immediately to that one. When he lifted it up, groans of disappointment were heard across the field. I went to mine and was pleased with the hide and my shooting for both shots were over halfway across the field. Some 450-500 yards for sure. But John has one of the scrawniest and scroungiest looking coyotes I've ever seen. "What happened?" I asked, "I thought you were shooting the big white one!" "Well, I was, I mean I did..." Helluva shot there John. Dark is upon us and as we walked back to the truck at the east end of the field dragging our trophies. As I listened to John grumble about his dog I spot a big patch of white off to our right. I trot over that way and find the biggest and whitest coyote I've ever seen. Hey, John. Any chance this is the one you shot?

    John obviously has some skills I don't know about. The ability to train his coyotes to line up just before the shot. We calculated; one coyote with one shot at 450 yards plus one more coyote with the same shot at say 500 yards is equal to one coyote with one shot at 950 yards. We rounded that up to 1000 and the stories began.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    2,127

    Default

    I had the luxury of living in Wisconsin during the last great cottontail explosion...I was 12 and Pops and I were on the forty acres behind the house, the 17 year old beagle had moved on the year before so we were hoofin it but with that many rabbits it was almost ridiculous. One guy carried a shotgun while the other carried a 22. I had grandpa's heirloom pump action 22 winchester...can't remember the model...it was ancient, pitted etc. but shot great and is still one of my favorite guns, and grandpa had passed on shortly before the beagle. We were sitting around drinkin some hot cocoa and havin a sandwich when dad looks up and then says, "wanna try this one"...I turn to look behind me and about 85 yards away is the silhouette of a bunny's head and shoulders sticking out of a stone pile. We looked around to make sure the line of fire was clear and I pulled up, cocked the hammer and offhanded one shot. The bunny did a backflip and laystill....both of us stood there in amazed silence and then busted out laughing as Pops clapped me on the back. We walked up and retrieved the rabbit and packed it up for the day. Great memories that he and I still laugh about sometimes.

    I think it was Pat McManus that wrote something to the effect that the key to the miracle shot....is not attempting to repeat it.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    2,127

    Default One more

    Great stories guys, these tales remind me of sitting around the stove at deer camp.

    Dad and I hunted whitetails on our ginseng farm in central Wisconsin, and while the area is lousy with them now, it wasn't so 15 years ago. It was late in the 9 day gun season and we were eatin tag soup. We had one small doe from bow season and were not lookin forward to the december hunt if we could help it. Pops was walking through a long tag alder creek bottom that led to our larger patch of woods which made a great bottle neck to put a stander on. Now, where I hunted in the flatlands of central wisconsin, the deer acted normally until around 9 a.m. on opening morning then ran like the dickens or crawled into holes for the next eight days due to the pressure. So, at this stage in the game, sitting in a stand all day got you cold feet but a good idea of the red squirrel population of the area, but didn't fill any freezers. So pops and I stayed on the move and the effect was largely like jumpshooting grouse. You snuck along with your eyes pealed, then out of nowhere, something jumps up crashes through the brush and one out of ten times offers a decent shot...but always startles the heck out of you.

    So, on this particular day, I was largely knawing on my tag due to hesitancy that season after a bad experience the year before where I retrieved the deer, but it got messy and I refused to repeat the scenario. So, in the off season I practiced more than I ever had and felt confident but was still gunshy unless things felt good. I stood there at my post watching the area. I could see dad's blaze about 100 yards away so if something moved out, I knew where I couldn't shoot. He was all of 50 yards away, when three deer bolted through the brush towards a natural shooting lane I was watching. Like ghosts, I could see the tails and outlines of the speeding deer and knew the nice doe was in the back. I put the gun up (my other favorite, dad's model 94 in 32 special) and waited, fawn one soared through the opening ( all of 10 yards wide) followed by fawn two, as the doe reached the height of her arch through the opening (I never did see her feet touch the ground) I put the gun where it felt right and squeezed. Pops thought the drive was over and flinched pretty hard at the report of the gun, as I kept my ears perked to hear her fall and where she might go. I wasn't that confident I had hit her considering the 100 yard distance and the rate she was moving...but it had felt right. We walked up to where she crossed and immediately I saw a fantastic blood trail...I was mixed with elation and dread since in that situation, clean and messy were milliseconds from each other, but followed the trail 30 yard to where she lay...shot dead with a hole in the absolute center of her heart. I haven't taken a running shot since.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Mine was on a nice running Impala at approximately 100 yards away with a really lightweight (hard kicking) 375 H&H. I called I hit it in the heart and the guide said, "Sure you did".
    We found it about 100 yards away with a Nosler drilled through the heart. Guide was extremely impressed. I just shut up and acted like it was normal but inside I was glowing!
    Tennessee

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Glennallen since 1980
    Posts
    155

    Default not one but three

    It wasnt just one it was three. My partner and I spotted a couple of caribou across a small pond about 150 yards away. Did the ol 1,2,3, and shoot mine drops and his rears up like a horse. My second shot dropped his also. We started walking around the pond to retrieve and up stands a bull moose one more shot and he's down too. A moose and two caribou all within two hundred yards of each other and with three shots. That was a long day.

  18. #18
    Member walk-in's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    771

    Default best shot

    I was in the army in upstate New York, and it was my first whitetail season. I had picked up a used 30-30 and put a Williams peep on it. Since it was my first season up there, I didn't really know many places to hunt, so I spent most of the season learning. I think it was the last weekend of the season (pretty close, anyway), and I was getting discouraged because I hadn't seen any bucks yet. I was working my way across a sidehill just low enough so that I wasn't skylined and looking down into a bowl when I saw a deer down in the bottom. It was moving through the brush, so I couldn't tell right away if it was a buck or not. I started working my way closer. I was about 1/2 way down the hill before I could see that it was a 2 point. I kept trying to get into position for a shot, but the deer kept moving. I was concentrating on him so much that I didn't pay attention to where I was stepping and broke a stick. He looked up at me and then turned tail.
    I thought that was the end of it, but decided to try and follow him anyway just on the off chance that I'd get another chance. I started to kind of circle around to where I thought he was heading, hoping to come at him from a different direction. Sure enough, about 20 minutes later, I found him bedded down in the snow, watching his back trail. The only problem was that there was still some small trees and scrub brush between us and he was higher than I was. I didn't think I could get closer without spooking him again, and I was pretty sure I wouldn't be able to find him again if I did. I started moving off to one side to see if I could get a shot and found a spot where I could just see most of his head if I kind of stood on my tiptoes. I figured that was the best shot I was going to get, so I took it. When I paced it off, it was just over 50 yards. Not a long shot by any means, but under the circumstances I felt pretty good about it. It was the first thing I had killed with my new gun and my first whitetail (grew up hunting black tails). It also earned me some bragging rights since none of my friends who had supposedly grown up hunting whitetails got one that year.

  19. #19
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    Mines not all that impressive but definatly the most memerable. I was 19 and had just purchased my Conteneder. I had spent alot of time on the range with it and new I was good to 200 yards so I decided to take it too deer camp with me. My Dad Uncle and cousin spent a week and a half given me crap about it. Every evening I'd come back too camp no deer, a I and the Contender would be the but of the jokes till bed time. Mosta herd "hell no he did'nt shoot nothin' and he aint gonna with that thing" a hundered times. Well everyone else had filled there tags and I was still empty handed, we had 3 days at camp left. That morning my Dad decided he'd sit on post with me while everyone else slept in. My post overlooked a medow and I had taken several deer from this spot in the past. Sure enough out walks a 4 point from the woods across the medow from us, so I rested the Contender on a log and lined up my shot. My Dad put his hand on my shoulder and when I looked over at him he shook his head no. I looked back through the scope and this time Dad squezzed my shoulder hard! When I looked at him this time he half wispered in a verey stern tone "Thats gotta be 200 yards your gonna just wound him if you hit him at all wait!" Well I sighted in and as soon as he went broad side I fiered. He took about 3 steps and fell. We paced the shot of at 195 yards it was the first time I had taken a shot that my Dad said no too and the last time anyone made fun of me or the Contender. I've made longer shots since then but none of them compairs too that one. In the split secound it took for that deer to drop my father accepted me as a man not just his son, and I dont know who was prouder Dad or I. 195 yards is a considered a log shot in Michigan for a rifle, most deer are taken at about 50-100 yards and this was at a time when no one we knew hunted with a hand gun. In the years that followed if I came back too camp empty handed everyone agreed it was because no deer had come within sight not because I could'nt kill anything with that funny little gun.

  20. #20
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,437

    Default

    nothing super long, dropped a couple grizz out past 300 that clients had wounded, quick instinctive off hand shots, we've all seen those. some on the first shot, some on the sixth or seventh...
    my favorite shot was on my mountian goat with a home made colt 1911, in 10mm, stalked him from about a half mile and walked right up behind him in his bed, he turned to look and he never got off the ground, apprx 3 yards, he died staring out over the ocean, man i lived in that moment, still do sometimes...
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •